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Sump pump


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#1 Keith1

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 04:09 PM

Ok, I know this sounds like an 'off the wall' topic, and I hope it is appropriate here. Due to ongoing water problems in our basement we want to install a sump pump. I was just wondering if anyone here has done it themselves, or have any thoughts about it.

I've done a ton of Googling about it, and it looks like it could cost up to a couple of thousand dollars to have it done, but kits for self installation run just a few hundred dollars. I can do electrical, plumbing, and such myself, and a buddy of mine has a jackhammer I can borrow to cut through the concrete floor. As far as getting rid of the water - the floor drain ( city sewer system ) is only about 4 feet away from the spot where I would install it.


One thought I had, was to call a plumber to get an estimate for installation, and see where he would install it, and run the drain. I know they have to go by 'local codes', but it would surely give me some ideas as to the 'basics'.

Alrighty, all thoughts and ideas are surely welcome on this matter.

Keith

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#2 cryptodan

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 04:21 PM

I would definitely get a professional assessment first as you may need more then 1 depending on the size of the basement. also determine if you need battery backup and stuff like that.

#3 caperdog

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 08:09 PM

hi keith
installing a sump pump should be a simple task but first i would try to determine where the water is coming from. is it from a crack in the foundation wall (concrete i assume but could be concrete block or ICF) or is it seeping up from the edges of the concrete floor ?
is it only after heavy periods of rain when the water table rises ?
is the basement finished ? because if the water is entering from below and you hammer a hole in the floor you are going to relieve that pressure so get prepared to pump immediately or better yet chip a trench from the floor drain to the area where you want to install the pump.
if water is coming from below the drain tile around the house may be plugged or crushed or full of root mass. this would be an expensive repair.
sump pumps are inexpensive (under $100 for column style $200 for submersible). 110 voltage, just plug it in.
anyone brave enough to tear apart a computer and has a friend with a jackhammer should be able to handle it.

#4 Keith1

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 10:30 AM

Crypto - good point about the battery backup, I hadn't thought about that. One thing I had planned to do is install a switch ( such as I have for the furnace ) whereby I can select house current or the portable generator. But..... if we're not home to switch over, the battery backup will be an excellent idea.

Caper - Our house was built in 1920 and has a concrete block foundation. The floor drain is about four feet from the back wall. There is a pencil sized hole in the block about two feet off the floor behind the washing machine which is always the first to leak during periods of heavy rain. However the water runs down about 4 feet to the floor drain so is no problem - I figured it would be a mistake to plug it and let the water come in somewhere else. Now here's the interesting part - once the leak starts on the back wall, it's almost always an hour before the leak starts on the front of the house, so I know to pull the carpet back and start putting down towels. Of course that's the finished side of the basement, and it would be a major operation to take down all the shelving and paneling to find the leak. Therefore I think putting in a sump pump would be the most viable option to try at this point.

The spot I have in mind is right next to the floor drain, and even if the pump wasn't running, i would think the overflow from the bucket would just run down a couple of feet to the drain. So when I get a plumber out to get an estimate I'm sure I will have all the professional information about installing it. One thing I forgot to mention before, is that our neighbors have sump pumps and they run quite a bit during heavy rains.

#5 Plastic Nev

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 12:37 PM

I would suggest that external land drainage is the root of the problem or should I say a lack of it.
Depends on how much of the land outside the building is yours to dig up and place suitable land drains into. Drain the land is the real answer, but if not able because of other property, the sump pump is the only other way to go.
Why all the fuss, I already have Windows 8. Three windows at the front, and five at the back since I bought the house.
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#6 Keith1

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 04:17 PM

Thanks for the input Nev, very good idea. However, that would be somewhat difficult to do here. The houses on our street are on platted lots, and we are the third one down out of six. Also, our neighbors house is set further back from the street than ours, and we would have to run the drain back over a hundred feet to clear his back yard. It's looking to me at this point that a sump pump would be the easiest and less expensive option.




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