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What's the best way to transfer to new hard drive?


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#1 Astrovel

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 01:54 PM

I have an old desktop HPdx2000 with maximum ram 4g and running XP Pro. I deleted a bunch of programs that I really didn't want to do because I was at 24% left open on my Seagate Barrucuda 80g HD and my some of my programs wouldn't run. I am now at 34% open. I plan on replacing the c: drive with a used 320g IDE hard drive. I have an old version of Ghost 14.0. I also have an IDE transfer cable where you hook two hard drives together to transfer from one to the other. I don't have a recovery disc for windows. Everything is in CAB files on c: drive.
What's the best way to clone my c: drive including the OS to the 'new' hard drive? Will I run into partitioning problems if the new drive is re-formatted? I would like to only copy certain files over because I think there may be a bunch of old non functioning files left over from old installs. There seems to be something running in the background that I can't find because when I try to delete some temp files it says it can't be deleted because another program is using the file. Same thing happened when I tried to update my Adobe Flash player. It said another file was using the program. I can't find it though, and I don't want to copy all the garbage over to the new drive.
Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
Vel

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#2 hamluis

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 02:48 PM

I would use any number of cloning programs which are better and more current than Ghost.

I have used both Macrium Reflect and Easeus Partition Master to clone drives/partitions...but there are a number of alternatives available.

Cloning the hard drive results in a bootable copy...and I would not make the space used on the new drive any larger than the size of the drive cloned.

Louis

#3 Astrovel

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 05:00 PM

Sorry, Louis, I don't get what you mean about not making the space any larger than the cloned drive. What would be the advantage then to change to a larger drive if I can't add back all the programs I deleted before and use the additional space on the new drive? Thanks for the info about the cloning programs.
Vel

#4 hamluis

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 05:52 PM

When you clone to a larger drive...the cloning program will ask you if you want clone the exact size of the drive which is being cloned...or whether you want to resize the new drive.

If you choose to resize the new drive so that you wind up with the entire drive space being used...by one gigantic partition...that's not very smart.

The smaller the Windows partition...less catastropic anything that happens on that partition...will be for the system.

Users need to store data files...on one or more different partitions that they create.

This limits their potential loss if a partition has problems, but the rest of the drive is OK.

It also makes it much easier/faster to do routine things like backing up the Windows partition, running chkdsk /r and defragging, running a scan of the Windows partition and so on.

I know...that many users think that a system is supposed to have just one single partition...because their systems came that way. But that's just not a very good way (IMO) of setting up a system. When all hard drives were small, it made sense to put everything on one partition...due to lack of space. But, with the advent of large/very large hard drives...we all have adequate space and Windows makes it rather easy to create partitions that serve user needs better.

There is no reason to cram everything onto the Windows partition and set ourselves up for failure if a section of the partition structure or a section of the hard drive goes bad.

In other words, you should have your Windows install, programs, and a few items on your C: partition...but all videos, music, graphics, documents, etc. should be stored on a different partition, IMO. They serve no purpose at all by being on the Windows partition, can be accessed quicker if they are on a different position.

All partitions other than the Windows partition...should not be created or worried about until after Windows has been installed.

FWIW: Most partitioning programs will also give you the capability of resizing any partitions, at any time. No matter how you start out...you can change the number of partitions and how large each is...whenever you feel like it.

Louis

#5 Astrovel

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 01:17 PM

Oh WOW! Now I understand what you meant. To put it scattered all over the drive would be like getting on a horse and riding off in all directions. Thanks very much for the enlightenment. Do you leave a certain amount open in that partition to allow for updates etc.? I will have to see if I can find a software that doesn't cost an arm and a leg to do the transfer and partition. I will have to read up on partitioning. I guess I didn't realize how important it is.
Thanks again
Vel

#6 rotor123

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 03:35 PM

The ones Louis mentioned are free, see below

Macrium Reflect free
http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=macrium%20reflect&source=web&cd=1&sqi=2&ved=0CDYQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.macrium.com%2Freflectfree.asp&ei=mlskT_vOCLSr0AHh2tTxCA&usg=AFQjCNF6uRx3XO6hyO7L3tgekvN5nExInA

Easeus Partition Master free
http://www.partition-tool.com/personal.htm

Good Luck
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#7 hamluis

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 04:00 PM

Think of a hard drive...as...a home that has no rooms, just one large living space.

Every time a roon is created, more privacy and organizational order can be achieved. Each room can be tailored to the needs/wants of the home owner.

Your Windows partition (reflecting Windows and all applications and a few other things) should be no larger than is useful, IMO. When I install Windows, I generally make an XP Windows partition of 20-30GB, while I create separate partitions for Music, Movies, Photos, Backups, and Miscelleaneous. I use multiple hard drives.

My current XP partition on this system is 30GB, with 13GB free today. I would have more free space if I moved some video files I downloaded... from My Documents to the partition I have created for them.

Partitioning is simply determining how I am going to use the space available to me in the best manner :).

Louis




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