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how to create a full recovery disk or usb stick?


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#1 svejk

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Posted 21 January 2012 - 07:02 PM

I have recovery discs that came with my HP laptop 8510 workstation.

I use them occasionally to perform a full system restore.

They require about an hour of 'babysitting' to key in the same commands I did last time around.

When I'm done doing so I reload half a dozen of my favorite programs, including Google Sketchup Pro, VLC Player, PDFXchange, and a few others like screen capture utilities.


Recently I wondered if it might not be possible to incorporate ALL of the above on one BOOTABLE media, that I could just insert, click "start" and be done with it.



After a few days of frustrating research I downloaded a trial of Acronis Home 2012 and it seemed pretty straightforward. I followed directions to a "T". Built a 'bootable' drive containing 9.2gb of data onto a formatted 16gb USB stick, and when I attempted to boot off the resulting drive my computer did not recognize it. I did all of the proper F10... assign usb drive for boot.... etc.

I inserted the drive into a working computer and it contains the following..

Local disk ©1.tib
TIB File
4,194,304kb

Local disk ©2.tib
TIB File
147,939KB


All my attempts to get help from the Acronis forum have devolved into a truly bizarre, sometimes testy, exchange about what it is exactly I'm trying to accomplish. Which is amazing. It's ultimately simple. A is on my harddrive.
I want to put A on a bootable recovery media that I can use to replace A, in it's entirety, back to my harddrive.
But everyone seems confused about my aims.

This is mind boggling.


Any help please??????

Edited by svejk, 22 January 2012 - 11:02 AM.


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#2 hamluis

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Posted 21 January 2012 - 07:23 PM

Your desires...are complicated by the fact that you have an OEM (HP system).

That means that HP devised it's method of restoring a system...in its own unique manner...which means that you may not necessarily be able to use bootable materials to reinstall the operating system.

Your system may require files stored on the hard drive (possibly in a hidden partition) to be used to reinstall the O/S. This makes the process not as convenient as users might want.

See:

http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bizsupport/TechSupport/Document.jsp?lang=en&cc=us&taskId=110&prodSeriesId=3355678&prodTypeId=321957&objectID=c01890478 http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bizsupport/TechSupport/Document.jsp?lang=en&cc=us&taskId=110&prodSeriesId=3355678&prodTypeId=321957&objectID=c00006110 http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bizsupport/TechSupport/Document.jsp?objectID=c01883653

Excerpt from HP FAQ linked above:

"HP stopped shipping the Windows XP operating system recovery discs in 2005, and never shipped recovery discs on computers with Vista or Windows 7. The HP Recovery Manager program is part of the original hard drive image on HP computers and can be used to recover the operating system from files stored in a partition on the hard drive without needing recovery discs. It can also be used to create a personalized recovery disc for a specific notebook.

A replacement recovery disk can be purchased for most models. See Recover Windows Vista Operating System Using HP Recovery ."

That's the best info I can give you, since I do not know exactly how HP's reocvery mechanism for that system works.

Louis

#3 svejk

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 11:14 AM

Thank you very much Louis.

My 2009 HP 8510 "workstation" shipped with recovery discs. Four discs were in the package. Two for winxppro and two for Vista. It is a "business class" PC. It may be that HP continued to ship recovery discs with business class notebooks such as mine well after that 2005 cutoff and in fact included Vista for the same reason. I don't know.

I have a hunch, I may be incorrect, that my system does not require files included on the harddrive to restore the O/S since I have used DBAN occasionally in the past to wipe that drive prior to reinstalling the system in order to be 110 percent certain that all malware/virus has been eliminated. Subsequent use of the original restoration discs proceeded without trouble.

I've read the links you provided. I also registered at HP user forums and posted my question there although those forums appear to be somewhat thinly populated with many topics going unanswered.

I'll return with anything conclusive on this in hope that you might further guide me.

Thank you again.

#4 Artrooks

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 02:37 PM

Hello svejk,

Sounds as if the flash drive is not bootable. Years ago I successfully made a bootable DVD recovery disk including one ".tib" image but I can't find that old tutorial.

I do understand what you want to accomplish; a one step image backup solution just like the computer manufacturers use. I too have searched unsuccessfully for the same solution but now settle for a two step image approach.

If all you want to do is simplifiy your computer restore process, why not use free imaging software such as Marium Reflect Free.
While it is a "two step" rather than "one step" process, it's much faster than what you are doing now.
You will need to install Macrium Reflect, create a CD Rescue Disk, then create the image file onto your USB Flash Drive (or other external drive).
Restoring is simply booting the Rescue CD and selecting the Image on your Flash Drive.

Here's the how to if you're interested:

  • After a clean windows installation on your HP Laptop including all windows updates plus the other software you require, install Macrium Reflect.
  • First, open Macrium and on top menu select "Other tasks," select "Create rescue media" and click "Linux," "next" and continue to choose the defaults.
  • It's advisable to test the boot cd to make sure it load correctly on your system before proceeding.
  • Start Macrium Reflect, from top menu choose "Backup" then "Image local drives", under "Source" select hard drive partition to backup.
  • Under "Destination" select "Folder" and browse to your USB Flash drive then click "Next."
  • Click "Advance Options" if you need to change image compression level, otherwise click "Finish."
For image restoration you will need to boot from the Rescue CD and point to the restore image file on Flash drive.

Regards,
Brooks



 


#5 mark1956

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 02:46 PM

Try this one: EaseUS Disk Copy

And there are quite a few others, but I'm not sure how many will clone to a USB stick, the one above says it will.

Paragon Backup & Recovery 2012 Free
DriveImage XML
Clonezilla Live
XXXClone

#6 James Litten

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 04:21 PM

Hi

Please forgive me if I misunderstood what you are looking for. It sounds like you want to get your computer set up a certain way, then make an image of the disk on a bootable USB stick so that at a later time you can wipe your disk and put it back to exactly how it was when you made the image by simply booting from the USB stick and having it recover your system.

I have successfully used Clonezilla Live to create a bootable USB stick with the recovery image on it. For a 10GB image, I would expect it to take you 5 minutes to boot from a properly prepared USB stick and start the recovery then you can walk away and about 45 minutes later, your disk will be restored. Here are the instructions that I use...

http://clonezilla.org/show-live-doc-content.php?topic=clonezilla-live/doc/04_Create_Recovery_Clonezilla

James

#7 svejk

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 06:10 PM

Wow. What an excellent forum this is!

Thank you each for the excellent suggestions and thorough responses. I'll take them from the top and give it my best shot.

I'll post back with anything that works out.

Thank you again.

#8 svejk

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Posted 24 January 2012 - 04:00 PM

Well, it turns out that I was only half way there. After reading all of your suggestions it seemed to me that I already had a program, acronis, that purported to do the same, but I was trying to accomplish everything in one step. Artrook's description sounded a lot like most of the instructions I'd observed in Acronis. So I tried again but this time built a "CD Rescue Disk" as Macrium calls it. I still do not understand why that boot info cannot reside on the USB stick itself, but I'll quit asking questions while I'm ahead.:)

So I went back to Acronis and built the "bootable cd" that contained only the program itself. I booted my computer up with this and it offered me the option to boot from windows or from Acronis. I booted from Acronis and eventually found my way to options to browse to my inserted USB recovery media. I inserted that USB that I had built previously (as mentioned in the first post) and was finally able to recover everything as I wanted.

WOW. I love this stuff!!!!! It took about six clicks, but it was straightforward and did precisely what I've been describing and in less then ten minutes tops with no babysitting. All my programs were there, no reminding the installation which partitions to use, no dozens of repeated agreements to parameters and conditions, no need to resend licence requests or retype license keys, no need to even set up my internet connection, everything just THERE and ready to use in a 100 percent fresh install.

If I ever need to repeat the same in the future I can do so in 15 minutes flat. That's ok with me.

Strange that the .tib image on the USB indicates only 4.1gb but after browsing for it and starting the install it indicated it contained 9.2gb. Must be some sort of compression?

Thanks again for your kind help here without getting exasperated with me. I realize in the end that it wasn't that difficult. But why program instructions aren't written with more clarity just blows my mind sometimes.

I really wish it were more common for software instructions to make use of visual aids. Consumer electronics often use this method. So what if it seems geared toward idiots. It works! A series of Block diagram indicating "you are here" with connections and arrows to boxes indicating the alternative steps you might wish to travel and the methods to get there.

Edited by svejk, 24 January 2012 - 04:17 PM.


#9 mark1956

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Posted 24 January 2012 - 04:46 PM

:thumbsup: Glad to hear you got that problem solved.




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