Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Sudden blue screen error message


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Uigi

Uigi

  • Members
  • 11 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:25 AM

Posted 15 January 2012 - 09:32 PM

First, I should apologize because I don't have the exact wording of the error message, and until it happens again I won't be able to, but perhaps I can come close enough. This has happened twice so far. It occurs so suddenly that I'm not sure what I was doing the first time, but the second time I wasn't doing anything besides deleting a couple of normal files and using Windows Explorer.

The message says that a problem was detected and that to prevent damage to my computer Windows had to be shut down immediately. It goes on to say that if this is the first time I've seen this screen I should just restart my computer. Otherwise I should check to see that I have sufficient disk space and if a driver is identified in the STOP message that I should disable the driver and see if the manufacturer has any updates for it. I wrote down the stop message, because it had numbers and I thought they might be useful. They are: 0x0000008E (0xCOOOOOO5, 0xBF954EF3, 0xF7823C00, 0x00000000). I can't remember the rest of the message. Once this screen appears, everything becomes completely non-responsive and all I can do is shut down my computer and boot it up again. Both times it has behaved normally for a while afterwards, but since it has now done it twice and I run the risk of losing any work I don't have saved when it happens, I decided to post on here.

EDIT: The only driver that I recently installed (that I can recall) is one for a Playstation 2 to USB converter a few weeks ago, but this problem has only started occurring a few days ago, so I'm not sure if that's even relevant.

Edited by Uigi, 15 January 2012 - 09:35 PM.


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 noknojon

noknojon

  • Banned
  • 10,871 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:12:25 AM

Posted 15 January 2012 - 10:40 PM

Hi -
This procedure will give all the details on your BSOD errors and help us -

Download BlueScreenView:
http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/blue_screen_view.html
unzip downloaded file and double click on BlueScreenView.exe to run the program.
when scanning is done, go to EDIT - Select All
Go to FILE - SAVE Selected Items, and save the report as BSOD.txt
Open BSOD.txt in Notepad, copy all of the content, and paste it into your next reply

Thank You -

#3 Uigi

Uigi
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 11 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:25 AM

Posted 16 January 2012 - 04:10 AM

Obviously, as the report indicates, the crash happened a third time.


==================================================
Dump File : Mini011612-01.dmp
Crash Time : 1/16/2012 3:02:55 AM
Bug Check String : KERNEL_MODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED
Bug Check Code : 0x1000008e
Parameter 1 : 0xc0000005
Parameter 2 : 0xbf954ef3
Parameter 3 : 0xb7da7c00
Parameter 4 : 0x00000000
Caused By Driver : win32k.sys
Caused By Address : win32k.sys+154ef3
File Description : Multi-User Win32 Driver
Product Name : Microsoft® Windows® Operating System
Company : Microsoft Corporation
File Version : 5.1.2600.6090 (xpsp_sp3_gdr.110303-1621)
Processor : 32-bit
Crash Address : win32k.sys+154ef3
Stack Address 1 : win32k.sys+14c580
Stack Address 2 : win32k.sys+14c5fc
Stack Address 3 : ntoskrnl.exe+666d8
Computer Name :
Full Path : C:\WINDOWS\Minidump\Mini011612-01.dmp
Processors Count : 1
Major Version : 15
Minor Version : 2600
Dump File Size : 90,112
==================================================

==================================================
Dump File : Mini011512-01.dmp
Crash Time : 1/15/2012 8:04:25 PM
Bug Check String : KERNEL_MODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED
Bug Check Code : 0x1000008e
Parameter 1 : 0xc0000005
Parameter 2 : 0xbf954ef3
Parameter 3 : 0xf7823c00
Parameter 4 : 0x00000000
Caused By Driver : win32k.sys
Caused By Address : win32k.sys+154ef3
File Description : Multi-User Win32 Driver
Product Name : Microsoft® Windows® Operating System
Company : Microsoft Corporation
File Version : 5.1.2600.6090 (xpsp_sp3_gdr.110303-1621)
Processor : 32-bit
Crash Address : win32k.sys+154ef3
Stack Address 1 : win32k.sys+14c580
Stack Address 2 : win32k.sys+14c5fc
Stack Address 3 : ntoskrnl.exe+666d8
Computer Name :
Full Path : C:\WINDOWS\Minidump\Mini011512-01.dmp
Processors Count : 1
Major Version : 15
Minor Version : 2600
Dump File Size : 90,112
==================================================

==================================================
Dump File : Mini011412-01.dmp
Crash Time : 1/14/2012 3:04:16 AM
Bug Check String : KERNEL_MODE_EXCEPTION_NOT_HANDLED
Bug Check Code : 0x1000008e
Parameter 1 : 0xc0000005
Parameter 2 : 0xbf954ef3
Parameter 3 : 0xee2f2c00
Parameter 4 : 0x00000000
Caused By Driver : win32k.sys
Caused By Address : win32k.sys+154ef3
File Description : Multi-User Win32 Driver
Product Name : Microsoft® Windows® Operating System
Company : Microsoft Corporation
File Version : 5.1.2600.6090 (xpsp_sp3_gdr.110303-1621)
Processor : 32-bit
Crash Address : win32k.sys+154ef3
Stack Address 1 : win32k.sys+14c580
Stack Address 2 : win32k.sys+14c5fc
Stack Address 3 : ntoskrnl.exe+666d8
Computer Name :
Full Path : C:\WINDOWS\Minidump\Mini011412-01.dmp
Processors Count : 1
Major Version : 15
Minor Version : 2600
Dump File Size : 90,112
==================================================

#4 mark1956

mark1956

  • Security Colleague
  • 271 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Spain
  • Local time:03:25 PM

Posted 16 January 2012 - 05:21 AM

I would suggest you start by running a test on your RAM and we can take it from there.

Please read all the instructions before starting.

IMPORTANT
Always disconnect your PC from the mains supply when removing Ram sticks and earth your hands to discharge any static electricity to avoid damage to sensitive components. If performing this test on a laptop PC you should also remove the battery before removing or replacing the RAM sticks.

Preliminary checks
For a new build: You should first check the model of RAM stick that you have on the manufacturers site for the recommended voltage setting and then make sure it is set correctly in the PC's Bios. An incorrect voltage setting may be the reason for your problems so test the PC's performance again if the voltage was incorrect.

For older PC's: Errors can also be caused by dirty contacts: Remove all the sticks and clean the contacts with a soft pencil eraser and blow out the slots with a can of compressed air.

A quick test you can do is to remove all but one of your RAM sticks, run the PC and see if the BSOD still happens, if it doesn't you have found the problem, if it does then swap the sticks. Continue this test with all the sticks, running the PC on one at a time. You may find that only one of the sticks causes the BSOD.


Download Memtest86+ from here

When the download is complete right click the file and select Extract Here and burn the image to a CD.

In windows 7 right click the extracted file, select Open With, then select Windows Disc Image Burning Tool then follow the prompts. For all other versions of windows (if you do not have an ISO burner) download this free software. ImgBurn
Install the program and start the application. Select the top left hand option to burn image file to disk and then on the next window click on the small yellow folder icon and browse to the ISO file you have downloaded. Then click on the two grey discs with the arrow in between (bottom left) and leave it to complete the operation.

Testing
Boot the PC into the Bios setup and set the CD/DVD drive to 1st in the boot sequence. Insert the disk in the drive then reboot and the disc will load into dos. Leave the test to run through at least 8 cycles or until it is showing some errors. If errors show in the test, remove all but one of your RAM sticks and repeat the test on each stick until you find the one that is faulty. This is a long slow test and should ideally be run overnight.

The memtest will not be 100% accurate but should easily detect any major faults.



#5 Uigi

Uigi
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 11 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:25 AM

Posted 19 January 2012 - 03:42 PM

In the meantime while I was looking into getting my RAM tested, I mentioned the problem I was having to a friend of mine. He suggested I might have registry errors and to run a program called C cleaner. I did so and it seems to have fixed the problem.

#6 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,277 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:09:25 AM

Posted 19 January 2012 - 03:52 PM

For your information:

Bleeping Computer DOES NOT recommend the use of registry cleaners/optimizers for several reasons:
  • Registry cleaners are extremely powerful applications that can damage the registry by using aggressive cleaning routines and cause your computer to become unbootable.

    The Windows registry is a central repository (database) for storing configuration data, user settings and machine-dependent settings, and options for the operating system. It contains information and settings for all hardware, software, users, and preferences. Whenever a user makes changes to settings, file associations, system policies, or installed software, the changes are reflected and stored in this repository. The registry is a crucial component because it is where Windows "remembers" all this information, how it works together, how Windows boots the system and what files it uses when it does. The registry is also a vulnerable subsystem, in that relatively small changes done incorrectly can render the system inoperable. For a more detailed explanation, read Understanding The Registry.
  • Not all registry cleaners are created equal. There are a number of them available but they do not all work entirely the same way. Each vendor uses different criteria as to what constitutes a "bad entry". One cleaner may find entries on your system that will not cause problems when removed, another may not find the same entries, and still another may want to remove entries required for a program to work.
  • Not all registry cleaners create a backup of the registry before making changes. If the changes prevent the system from booting up, then there is no backup available to restore it in order to regain functionality. A backup of the registry is essential BEFORE making any changes to the registry.
  • Improperly removing registry entries can hamper malware disinfection and make the removal process more difficult if your computer becomes infected. For example, removing malware related registry entries before the infection is properly identified can contribute to system instability and even make the malware undetectable to removal tools.
  • The usefulness of cleaning the registry is highly overrated and can be dangerous. In most cases, using a cleaner to remove obsolete, invalid, and erroneous entries does not affect system performance but it can result in "unpredictable results".

Unless you have a particular problem that requires a registry edit to correct it, I would suggest you leave the registry alone. Using registry cleaning tools unnecessarily or incorrectly could lead to disastrous effects on your operating system such as preventing it from ever starting again. For routine use, the benefits to your computer are negligible while the potential risks are great.
Louis

#7 mark1956

mark1956

  • Security Colleague
  • 271 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Spain
  • Local time:03:25 PM

Posted 19 January 2012 - 03:59 PM

The advice by Hamluis is well worth taking note of.

I would be suprised if the BSOD's do not return. CCleaner is only likely to have removed orphan registry entries which are harmless, will this stop the BSOD's? we will see.

#8 Uigi

Uigi
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 11 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:25 AM

Posted 19 January 2012 - 05:49 PM

Okay, so I understand now why registry cleaners are mostly ineffective at speeding up computers, which is what they seem to usually be used for based on the reading material you've given me, and that they pose potential threats to computers they are used on. This leaves me quite confused about a couple of things though.

First of all, why have the errors stopped? Is this believed to be complete coincidence, has it actually fixed the error but done so improperly, or does the possibility exist that this particular time it fixed the error and did so without harmful side effects? Second of all, Hamluis says, "Not all registry cleaners are created equal." I'm sure that's true, since in any case software can only be as smart as the developer can make it. What is the likelihood that I should be worried about having run Ccleaner specifically, as opposed to other registry cleaners? Which side of the spectrum does it fall on? Third and finally, if the error has been fixed in some form or fashion by Ccleaner or even something else I did (somehow), can we conclude that the error was not hardware related and that if it returns I should look to software problems, rather than hardware? Is there any way to confirm that I have a hardware error before I start taking RAM sticks out of my computer?

#9 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,277 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:09:25 AM

Posted 20 January 2012 - 07:24 AM

What follows is strictly my opinion re use of "registry tools" and rambling about in the registry.

IMO, most knowledgeable members don't use registry tools to make changes...a knowledgeable person will make registry edits manually, targeting specific keys and values...and do so confident in the knowledge that he/she can reverse or undo any changes which he/she may make. The analogy that I might use is that of a craftsman...who has a clear idea of what he/she wants to do and how to go about trying to achieve the desired result, based on plans, documentation, and experience.

Anything which a "registry cleaner/optimizer" does...amounts to a shotgun blast, according to some template worked out who knows when...that is applied to every computer system on which said software is run. The template may relate to some general concept of what a system registry should look like...it does not/cannot relate to the specific registry of a given system...since these vary according to what is installed on the system. The registry for a system with current critical updates installed...must vary considerably from that of a system without such. The registry for a system with an OEM (HP, Lenovo, etc.) manufacturer...may vary from that of a person who installed a version of Windows which does not have manufacturer's own installed programs/partitions/backup or restore-to-factory defaults mechanisms. And so on.

I could never assume...that the theoretical "fixes" applied by a registry cleaner...are ones which need to be made to overcome my specific problem...unless I knew what those "fixes" are...and I knew what specific problems they are designed to overcome.

Most users of registry tools fail this test. They are groping blindly in the dark for a "solution" to that which they may construe as problematical...or some shortcut to "better performance." Rather than take the time to try to properly troubleshoot known issues, these users want a "quick fix", a "deus ex machina" to save them the time and effort it takes to try to achieve what they want.

There is no universal panacea for all computer system problems, due to the nature of the computing. Various program developers take advantage of the lack of knowledge by some computer users...and spew forth "solutions" for that market.

Re Ccleaner...it has a registry edit function as part of the package of what it purports to do. I've never found that Ccleaner does anything I cannot do myself, as far as the other functions I have seen detailed. Windows itself provides the capability to do most, if not all, else that Ccleaner advertises.

http://www.piriform.com/ccleaner

As for the claim of removing "unused and old registry entries"...there is no need at all to do that. And, if a user feels that he/she wants to do it...such can be done manually. I must add...Windows installs a number of registry entries to facilitate installing/using various programs...perhaps these are part/all of the "unused" category referred to. My basic problem with any product advertising such a dubious benefit is that I have no clue how Ccleaner determines what is "old" or "unused" and I have no idea why it wants to remove such entries.

I could go on, but I think you get the picture.

FWIW: I had a system dating back to Win 95, I made no effort at all to find out what the registry is until I had moved to Win 98. That is when a number of these "registry cleaners/optimizers" first appeared, with Norton Utilities being one of the first ones that people employed. As more data began to become accumulated about the performance/value of such programs...it became clear that these programs often caused problems with systems.

These programs evolved out of a sitution where new users did not know very much about Windows and/or a system...and, in the face of the unknown, they sought easy answers.

As far as I am concerned, there are no easy answers to system problems. Users who are unwilling to do the research and troubleshooting that MAY lead to a solution...will forever be subject to exploitation and bad advice/suggestions that are often intended to help.

The computer forums which exist today...and Google...are two of the best tools for any user who wants to come out of the dark...into the light.

I don't intend to dissuade from using CCleaner, Advanced System Care, etc...that's a user decision. But the website tried to let such users know that there potential problems with groping around in the dark and believing rhetoric which is clearly designed for the uninformed, unknowing user.

The BC statement is designed to try to remove some of that lack of knowledge, no more, no less, IMO.

Another FWIW: The best way to "speed up" your system is...install max RAM supported, ensure that Windows has the suggested minimum amount of free space on the Windows partition, eliminate programs which are fluff (consume system resources without providing any real value), and perform the basic routine maintenance on Windows.

As I see it :).

<<First of all, why have the errors stopped? Is this believed to be complete coincidence, has it actually fixed the error but done so improperly, or does the possibility exist that this particular time it fixed the error and did so without harmful side effects?>>

I cannot answer that, since I have no clue as to what was done. I can't speculate on what transpired, but I would not be surpriesed if you have problems post your "problem-elimination."

Louis




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users