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What Is The Use Of Learning C?


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#1 vinith_04

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Posted 10 February 2006 - 06:57 AM

Hi,
I wanted to know what are the applications I can create using C.
How much time will it take to study C.
Please reply.

Vinith

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#2 Osiris

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Posted 10 February 2006 - 07:10 AM

Thats a good question i was studying C++ in a book ive bought and once i got half way threw i wondered why do i need to learn this i havnt a clue what i could create with it.
I can only learn what i want to learn.

#3 jgweed

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Posted 10 February 2006 - 11:24 AM

Since C and C++ are programming languages, you can use these to do just about anything, from a simple task of comparing two files and creating an output of exceptions to creating a complex graphic game.
Regards,
John
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#4 groovicus

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Posted 10 February 2006 - 12:31 PM

The other point that many people seem to miss is that there really is no end to learning a language, so asking " How much time will it take to study C" is sort of a weird question. First, I don't think it is possible to completely learn any language (or I should say, any robust language), so in that sense, the answer to the question is "forever". How long it will take to learn to do something useful depends on how much time one puts into it, and how well one understands what they are doing. I suppose it also depends on the definition of useful.... A simple program that uses Newton's method for estimating square roots is useful to me (and easy to program). A "Hello World" program is useful if it helps one understand the layout of a program, or how to use the compiler, etc.

I have been using Java for over two years, and a conservative estimate of what I know is probably less than 1% of what there is to know about Java. I have a core knowledge of the libraries, but there will always be something that someone is doing different that I can learn from, and that education never stops. I can write lots of useful programs (and am making a very modest second income from it).. but I don't "know" Java in the sense you are talking about. Who wants to remember all of that crap anyway when it is easy enough to look up samples of whatever it is I want to accomplish. :thumbsup:

#5 Osiris

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Posted 10 February 2006 - 07:49 PM

I still dont understand how C++ can help me all ive seen so far is number and .";,[]() signs like thoes that i cant seem to remember.
I can only learn what i want to learn.

#6 groovicus

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Posted 10 February 2006 - 08:03 PM

C++ will give you exactly the same thing that every other language will give you. Programming is programming, and it doesn't make a bit of difference which language is being used. String manipulation in C++ is exactly the same as string manipulation in Java. A stack is the same in C++ as in C, or in Java.

A language merely provides the building blocks for creating applications. I've been trying to make you understand that, but it seems that so far I have failed. It is no different than learning a foreign language. No matter what the language, there are still nouns, verbs, sentences, ideas, etc.

#7 Osiris

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Posted 10 February 2006 - 08:17 PM

So is it possible to make a webpage with C++ and html ?
I can only learn what i want to learn.

#8 groovicus

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Posted 10 February 2006 - 08:29 PM

It is quite possible. Try a search for "C++ web based services".

#9 Osiris

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Posted 10 February 2006 - 08:55 PM

hmm can i make table with C++ or would C++ be used for the server side of the webpage?
I can only learn what i want to learn.

#10 acklan

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Posted 10 February 2006 - 09:25 PM

I know no language, simple or complex, but from what understand Windows it's self is written in C++. This should give you the scope of what you can do with it. Down to small program like HJT which changes people's live profoundly.
What can you do? Knowing the C++ programing language means having the what you need and not relying on a "one size fits all.." solution.
I mentioned earlier I do not know a programing language. I mean I cannot learn it. I have The full Microsoft Visual C++ 6.0 with a 36 cd libriary, but have failed to grasp the knowledge needed.
What can you do? What couldn't you do.
If I have spoke on the topic and given a bad view please let me know.
"2007 & 2008 Windows Shell/User Award"

#11 Osiris

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Posted 10 February 2006 - 11:46 PM

Well you might not have gottin C+ but have you tryed any other programming languages out there ? like php, CSS, Html, JavaScript, perl, Pascel, there are many more but there a limit to how many i know but im pritty sure you could learn more then one of thoes i just named off.
I can only learn what i want to learn.

#12 vinith_04

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Posted 11 February 2006 - 01:45 AM

Thanks for replying.

Vinith

#13 Osiris

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Posted 11 February 2006 - 12:40 PM

:thumbsup: no problem buddy.

You realy should look into learning an easier language thoe so then later once youve got 1 or 2 languages down path you can go on to a more challenging one.
I can only learn what i want to learn.

#14 Swandog46

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Posted 13 February 2006 - 12:22 AM

Osiris, the languages you mention are all used for different functions. C/C++/Java are the general all-purpose programming languages in the list, and C/C++ are probably the fastest (maybe Pascal too, I actually don't remember how fast compiled Pascal was). I actually think C is a great language to start with, because if you learn C you can handle literally anything.

Many of the others are for more special purposes. For example, Perl and PHP are scripting languages --- they are used for automating routine tasks, and powerful programs can be written in them very quickly. The tradeoff for that is speed --- they can be up to a factor of 10 or even 100 slower. PHP is the de-facto standard for web-based scripting --- if you use a web page that has a form or some kind of embedded program for processing, chances are it's in PHP. Most of this forum is written in PHP.

JavaScript is a scripting language too used usually for embedding small scripts into web pages. HTML isn't even a programming language, it's a markup language.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Markup_language

The moral of the story is that different languages are useful for different purposes. But when LEARNING to program, I suggest you choose a language and stick to it for now. Because most of the process of learning to program carries over from one language to another --- the basic ideas, strategies, and even structural designs, even if the syntax may change (and frankly most languages are even fairly similar in syntax nowadays). Hope this helps :thumbsup:




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