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Will old style HD's become cheap again?


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7 replies to this topic

#1 printerandink

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 03:40 PM

The prices are REALLY insane right now.

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#2 Required Field

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 03:48 PM

I'm pretty sure that has to do with a natural disaster over in Thailand. Prices jumped $50 overnight. Whether it will ever go down again or not, who knows? I was asking the same question about the cost of a gallon of milk. Once prices for anything go up, they rarely come down without massive competition.
edited for spellin/grammar

Edited by Required Field, 06 January 2012 - 03:49 PM.

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#3 rotor123

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Posted 07 January 2012 - 03:43 PM

I believe the prices will come down again.
Will they come down to previous levels? I do not know.
I also believe that it will be a fair amount of time before they really drop.
As prices decline the pent up demand will slow down the price drop. I've seen many posts from people that were going to buy and are just waiting for prices to drop before buying.

I've also noticed that a lot of the current drive sales are refurbs.

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#4 hamluis

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Posted 07 January 2012 - 03:44 PM

The prices of hard drives...tends to vary with what is being marketed.

Older drives will generally cost more (sometimes much more) per storage unit (GB) than newer drives...because hard drive manufacturers and motherboard manufacturers...will not be making components which accomodate older drives. They make products for the purpose of profit...there's no profit in producing drives which are considered obsolete and won't be part of future demand.

Hence...we now have conversion adapters for both PSUs and motherboards to accommodate those who still use to use smaller, more expensive PATA drives, when SATA drives are probably the bulk of the target market for manufacturers.

The same situation will eventually happen to SATA drives, when the price becomes less prohibitive and more appealing to the "avergage computer user or buyer".

Life...is not a static process and the computer component market is living proof of that.

Considering the fact that the prices and quality of computer components...have progressively moved in favor of greater benefit to users getting more for their money...it's an unusual trend which benefits those who use computers.

Louis

EDIT: The smaller price differential between solid-state drives and PATA/SATA drives...the more likely that many will opt to spend bucks on SSDs, discounting the storage-space disparity.

Edited by hamluis, 07 January 2012 - 03:51 PM.


#5 rotor123

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Posted 07 January 2012 - 05:11 PM

Louis, Considering that many users have way more hard drive space than they will ever use I'd bet that a 160Gb drive would be enough.

If you work with HD Video that is another story. Even there three 160GB would suffice.
One Boot & Apps drive, One for source video, one for edited video
Burn source and finished product on BluRay media, wipe source drive and destination drive and repeat as needed. You could probably do that for $600 to $800. :whistle:

In the real world I use a ssd boot drive and regular Hard drives for source and Destination.
After all I'm poor. If I weren't poor my computer toys would keep me that way.

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#6 the_patriot11

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Posted 07 January 2012 - 11:43 PM

For the most part I would agree with you rotor-in my primary system, I have a terabyte of hard drive space (2 500 gig drives together) of which I use 150 gigs :whistle: However, I have a second system with a 500 gig hard drive that I am in the process of turning into a media center/DVR, and seeing how much I use the DVR I currently rent from the cable company, that 500 gigs is gonna disappear really really fast. I know some people, who really do need that extra drive space-Ran into one guy does a lot of Djing, and as such had to have truckloads of high quality music, safe to say he used up a 640 gig drive pretty fast. But your right, the average user-even your average gamer wont need anything more then 160 gigs.

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#7 hamluis

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Posted 08 January 2012 - 07:24 PM

Good comments, I understand.

Me...I don't game, I'm retired...I am unconcerned about how fast my system boots or does anything...so an SSD would be just another drive in either of my systems.

I have 1.5 TB drive, 3 500GB drives, and I use a 250GB and a 320GB as my boot drives (smallest I have).

I don't know what other persons do on their systems...but I record a lot sports events and old movies. I do routine backups or clone my boot partitions.

I must admit that I have about 500GB of free space on the 1.5TB drive...but we are in basketball season now :), so that will be used.

I treat my PC...like an entertainment center, which is what I want it to be.

I understand that many users are quite content with smaller storage space...but they probably don't do backups, don't keep copies of programs installed, don't capture/edit video, etc.

I know that I'm not typical, but...someone besides me is buying all that hard drive space...or we would not have 3TB drives available.

Could it be...the business community? Could it be system manufacturers? I think that's where the big bucks may be for hard drive manufacturers and it's unlikely that they will be going crazy over the value-loss which might take place with SSDs.

I've been wrong before, so it won't surprise if my premises are totally awry :).

Louis

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Edited by hamluis, 08 January 2012 - 07:30 PM.


#8 Required Field

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Posted 09 January 2012 - 09:28 AM

I don't think business users are buying up the 1-3TB drives, at least not on purpose. A lot of businesses aaround here save evefrything to their server, the workstations are just kind of "there," so even an 80GB is sufficient for them. Plus, with the big push for businesses to use cloud storage and services, there's less reason to buy workstations with lots of storage. yself, though, at home, I use a 1TB Seagate, and it's half full.
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