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License Help


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6 replies to this topic

#1 Nate15329

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Posted 04 January 2012 - 10:33 PM

I am unfamiliar with the licensing agreement of this project at this location or any at that(newbie at licensing).
I'm basically making a very very similar application(as if I completely replaced it) only with Microsoft Visual Basic as the program language.
So far I understand that I can keep a private copy of this on a private computer, correct me if I'm wrong.
I'm hoping to call it Yumi VB (i know, not original, but was hoping that the original author would host it or I'll host it either on sourceforge or somehow with a private server or hosting site).
But I am not sure if I would be allowed to distribute it and I won't till I know that the license says I can and how.
If possible place some links to help out others and me to understand licensing and how they can use it or others if they are trying to make alternate versions of other programs if possible.

Also, I wondered if I could make cash off it(either by donations(i assume i can do this anytime) or by selling the program(not sure if that would work since YUMI exists already)) or change licensing as well. (I'm not familiar with any of this.)

Edited: Also, The original Program is under the GNU GPL v2 license, if that helps.

Edited by Nate15329, 05 January 2012 - 01:03 AM.


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#2 Billy O'Neal

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Posted 04 January 2012 - 10:41 PM

First, please be advised, I am not a lawyer, this is not legal advice. You should probably seek the help of an IP attorney before continuing.

As far as I am aware, so long as the original service doesn't do anything that requires patent licensing, you should be just fine. The original implementation is protected by copyright of course, but you didn't look at the original. (Did you?)

After all, Microsoft can't sue OpenOffice for making something that opens .doc files.

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#3 Andrew

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 03:07 AM

Just like Billy O'Neal, I'm not a lawyer and this isn't legal advice.

It is licensed under the terms of the GNU GPL v.2. This means that you are free to distribute it and to make changes and distribute (even sell) your modified version provided that you attribute authorship of the original code and that you make the source code of your application available to others under the same, or similar, license.

This applies only if you use any of their source code, though. You can certainly create your own work-alike and distribute or sell it. Note that if, like YUMI, you use third party tools which are under the GPL (YUMI uses Grub4DOS, SysLinux, and Fat32Format.exe for example) you may be obligated to honor the GPL.

Edited by Andrew, 06 January 2012 - 03:08 AM.


#4 Didier Stevens

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 06:52 AM

This applies only if you use any of their source code, though. You can certainly create your own work-alike and distribute or sell it.


Correct, but you also have to check that no patents are involved. I believe if patents are involved, you have to obtain a license from the patent owner, even if you write totally new source code.

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#5 Romeo29

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 09:10 AM

US$ 0.02

As per my little understanding, GPL2 allows you to use the source code in your own programs, modify it in any way you want. I noticed that Yumi uses NSIS script, SysLinux, Grub etc in binary format. If you include any GPL2 licensed program (compiled binary) like SysLinux etc. in your program, then you should mention it in your program and include a copy of GPL2.

#6 Billy O'Neal

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 09:34 AM

As per my little understanding, GPL2 allows you to use the source code in your own programs, modify it in any way you want. I noticed that Yumi uses NSIS script, SysLinux, Grub etc in binary format. If you include any GPL2 licensed program (compiled binary) like SysLinux etc. in your program, then you should mention it in your program and include a copy of GPL2.

If your product is composed of any GPL2 modules, you would have to distribute your entire project under GPL2, or a less restrictive license. That would mean the source code of your product would have to be available.

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#7 Romeo29

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 11:56 AM

If your product is composed of any GPL2 modules, you would have to distribute your entire project under GPL2, or a less restrictive license. That would mean the source code of your product would have to be available.
Billy3

I thought you could just include GPL license for that binary, which includes a link to download the source code and you are done. Thanks for clearing that :)




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