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Migrating my HD to a new HD


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#1 angerli

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 10:28 AM

Hello, folks! I've bought a new 1.5Tb HD to replace my old 300Gb one, and I want to migrate my XP Pro OS and every bit and byte to the new HD.

There's got to be a fairly direct and simple way to do this (in DOS commands?), but I need some sage advice before I dare proceed. Can someone on the Forum please give me a hand with this?

I'm too much of a geek (built my first PC in 1984, a PC-XT!) to give this job to a computer shop!!

Thanks, gang!

Sandy Gerli
Durham NC

Edited by hamluis, 31 December 2011 - 10:10 AM.
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#2 rotor123

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 01:26 PM

Here is a tutorial for that: http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/backup-your-computer-with-driveimage-xml/

You could also look at Easeus Todo Backup Free at http://www.todo-backup.com/products/

One thing to remember after a successful clone has finished power down and unhook the old drive and only have the new drive hooked up. It can cause problems if you boot with both hooked up after a clone when running XP.

The other thing if you ever clone to a drive with something on it. Everything will be lost and be careful not to clone the the destination drive to the source drive by choosing wrong.

Good Luck
Roger

Edited by rotor123, 30 December 2011 - 01:31 PM.

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#3 AustrAlien

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 10:16 PM

...... but I need some sage advice before I dare proceed.

Cloning the smaller hard drive to a larger one is straight-forward using one of the many cloning applications: That's the easy bit. The sage advice is not going to be so easy for you to swallow.

Have you confirmed that your existing system is compatible with using a 1.5 TB hard drive? Most older systems will handle up to 500 GB without question ... but from 1 TB upward, the BIOS on the motherboard will not necessarily be compatible/able to use the larger sized hard drives that are now available.

Here's the bit that might be hard for you to swallow: What you propose to do is not advisable under any circumstance. There are a couple of good reasons for this:
  • 500 GB hard drives are about as large a size as you can get that are reliable enough to have an operating system on them. Once you get over this size and especially into the 1TB + sizes they are just not as reliable. (This is entirely my own opinion, of course, and I have nothing to back it up with.)
  • Things go wrong, and hard drives fail. When that happens on a larger sized hard drive (and it will), repairing and recovering the system and the files is a much bigger and more awkward job, and if the hard drive fails catastrophically, you are likely to suffer a far greater loss than if using 2 or more smaller hard drives.
My "sage" advice (knowing the little information that you have provided) would be to retain the 300 GB hard drive for the Windows XP operating system and use the larger hard drive for storage only.

If nothing else, I hope I have provided an alternative for you to at least consider.
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#4 Eyesee

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 11:01 PM

Agree with Austrailien

Use the second drive for storage only
Also you might run into the bios issue that he pointed out.

What is the make/model of the system?
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#5 rotor123

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Posted 31 December 2011 - 11:08 AM

I have to agree with AustrAlien and Eyesee as that is what I do on desktops. I'd do it on my laptops if I could. Not to mention it is easier and cheaper to clone a small drive than a big drive.

My desktop has a 300Gb boot drive and large drives for data storage. I use two additional drives since HD 1080i video files run big and two drives so I can render or author from one to the other for better speed. And a BluRay drive for backups and making BluRay movies now that the drives and media are reasonable for good brands. The build I did for my Brother is a 160Gb boot drive (SSD) and originally one 1Tb data drive now with two USB externals so he can have two backups.

All four systems also have a cloned backup of the boot drive. Needed for my brothers when he caught a virus. Easier to clone the backup back to his boot drive than fight a virus.

If the boot drive is getting full right now I'd bet there is plenty of data files that could be moved to the new drive. Not to mention as a form of insurance once the new drive is setup run the drive makers diagnostics on it to be sure it is good. And do not delete anything you copy to it for a couple of weeks just in case.

I'll give an example of why you need to check. I setup a small Proliant server with three drives in raid 5 for someone I know. They supplied everything including the memory upgrade. The Seagate drives must have had a bad journey. One had bad sectors and one kept at random giving loud bunches of clicks and the third was silent.
I gently suggested getting them all replaced. The Replacement Western Digital (RE3 markings as I remember) Server drives were fine. Both sets in the HP mounting and HP part number stickers.

New is not always good.

Edited by rotor123, 31 December 2011 - 11:09 AM.

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