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Xp Install Question


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5 replies to this topic

#1 Jaybird934

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Posted 07 February 2006 - 10:56 AM

Simple question I've never thought of, until a friend asked me yesterday. My friend bought a new hard drive to use in his laptop. He also has one of these "enclosure" things that allow his new hard drive to be read from his usb/firewire port. He told me he intends to just directly copy all the data (everything, straight from the main root) from his old hard drive straight to his new hard drive, then swap the drives so that he's using the newer larger one in his laptop, and can eventually erase his old one....using it for other things. I first told him I don't think XP will like being copied in this way, and that he'd be better to just install XP on the new one and begin reinstalling all his programs. After thinking about it, I'm not certain his way will fail.

Anyone know if his way would work? Is this likely to cause quirky little stability issues??

thanks much in advance, Jason

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#2 Cyclica

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Posted 07 February 2006 - 12:42 PM

Hello there. You are right: it's not a good idea to just copy the disk's contents to the new one, because system folders and files simply won't copy, Windows will tell you they are being used or won't see them at all.

I suggest you to initialize the new disk, create partitions and re-install everything from scratch. Once you have Windows and apps fully installed in the new disk, you may use the User State Migration Tool (USMT) to transfer all the personal data such as favorites, mail, desktop, etc. You'll have to make the new installation first, and then, start the USMT (don't erase the old data until you are sure you have everything you need).

Here is a step-by-step guide for USMT:

http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechn...tfset.mspx#EDAA

#3 River_Rat

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Posted 07 February 2006 - 01:03 PM

This is something I have never seen or heard of doing without a 3rd party utility.
If the new drive didn't come with a disk that provides such a utility then check the drive manufactures webside most of them offer a utility that will clone the new drive. Note there are many instances that say these free utilities do not work as good as they say they will so use at your own risk.

Another option is to purchase one.
I use & recommend Norton Ghost.
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#4 hamluis

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Posted 07 February 2006 - 06:12 PM

He could use a 3d-party utility to image the drive to another drive, but simply copying won't work at all.

If it were that simple...could Product Activation work at all? And, it does work.

Louis

#5 River_Rat

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Posted 07 February 2006 - 07:54 PM

He could use a 3d-party utility to image the drive to another drive, but simply copying won't work at all.

If it were that simple...could Product Activation work at all? And, it does work.

Louis


<hu> What does WPA have to do with ghosting the old drive to the new one????

1 - Install Ghost on the old drive > Create a Boot Floppy
2 - Put the old drive in the external case > plug it in > turn it on
3 - Put the new drive in the laptop
4 - Boot from the Floppy Disk
5 - Follow the instructions (don't forget which drive is the source & destination disk)

After installing ghost you can read the tutorials to familiarize your self with how it works.

#6 usasma

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Posted 09 February 2006 - 10:54 AM

Short answer - No, he can't do it. A copy won't put the boot sector files back in the place that they need to be.

But, the good news is that he can get a free drive clone utility from the hard disk manufacturer and can clone his drive to the new drive.

The difference is that "cloning' and "imaging" utilities keep track of where the files go on the disk. The copy command just puts 'em on the disk wherever there's space available.
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