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Shall I just ignore this memory message?


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15 replies to this topic

#1 MickinPlymouthUK

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Posted 25 December 2011 - 12:07 AM

Hi, this message has started popping up occasionally and i can't figger out why-

Posted Image

It appears when i'm simply surfing around and using the computer normally, it never used to appear so why should it start doing so now?
The PC doesn't show any signs of distress in any way when it appears, so I ignore it without taking any action and after about 10 secs it vanishes and the PC continues working fine.
Shall i go on simply ignoring it?
I'm Win XP Home

Edited by hamluis, 27 December 2011 - 11:54 AM.
Moved from XP to AV, Firewall, etc.


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#2 frankp316

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Posted 25 December 2011 - 05:49 AM

Honestly, I would ditch AVG and replace it with something else like Avast. AVG has really gone downhill in recent years.

#3 jhayz

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Posted 25 December 2011 - 06:18 AM

Check this notification settings from AVG http://forums.avg.com/image/freeforum/ww/173816/8106
However as suggested there are other alternative antivirus such as Microsoft Security Essential, Avast and Avira.

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#4 buddy215

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Posted 25 December 2011 - 06:25 AM

Would be a good idea to check the addons in IE to see if something has been added recently or something is there
that you don't need to be there.
The info in the message is correct as to how to release the memory and depending on how much available RAM you
have installed you would see an improvement after restarting IE.

Which IE are you using...6...7...8? How much RAM is installed?

Would be a good idea to use another security program such as Super AntiSpyware Free to scan your computer if you haven't
done so. Allow it to remove whatever it finds. If SAS finds and removes anything other than ad cookies, let us know by posting the log.
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#5 hamluis

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Posted 25 December 2011 - 09:40 AM

In agreement with what has already been stated, I formerly used AVG until they started fooling with it. I don't want an AV program...checking my RAM or doing anything other than worrying about defeating/repelling known viruses, so I would (at the least) disable this feature. The fact that it can be disabled should be an indication that it's non-essential (and possibly flaky) in terms of what the product is supposed to do, IMO.

From http://forums.avg.com/ww-en/avg-forums?sec=thread&act=show&id=173969 :

Please be informed AVG 2012 includes a new AVG Advisor feature. It is designed to warn user that there could be a memory leak in your browser (in a script or a flash within a visited website, respectively). AVG records an average amount of memory used by a browser and is regularly checking the value during browser usage. In case the memory consumption is significantly increased, user is informed about possible memory leak. Browser re-start is recommended in such scenario.
Please see an example of AVG Advisor informative window here
In case you would like to disable AVG Advisor (this may be handy in case you are used to work with internet browser differently than most users), you may proceed as follows:
- Open AVG user interface and press F8.
- Select the Appearance item in the left tree.
- Untick the Display AVG Advisor performance notifications option (screenshot).
- This will disable both the notifications and memory usage monitoring.
- Click OK to save any changes.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Louis

#6 frankp316

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Posted 25 December 2011 - 11:20 AM

And a browser memory leak isn't something that should concern the average user. It could be a concern to a website developer. This is bordering on snake oil. AVG has added a useless feature designed to fool the average user into thinking the product is doing something meaningful when in fact the alert is meaningless and incovenient because they want you to restart your browser. Very dishonest.

Edited by frankp316, 25 December 2011 - 11:22 AM.


#7 rotor123

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Posted 26 December 2011 - 01:44 PM

Maybe they copied Norton Antivirus.

It warns of high memory usage and CPU usage as I remember it.

Fortune Cookie says: Fortune not Found: Abort, Retry, Ignore?

Sent from my All-In-One Desktop. Perfect for Internet, Not for heavy usage or gaming however.

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#8 Nawtheasta

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Posted 26 December 2011 - 04:22 PM

For what it's worth...
High Mem usage was one of the symptoms for the infection my sons laptop just had. The "Am I infected forum" seems to be overwhelmed with this type right now. ESET was the only AV program that detected ( could not clean) the rootkit on his laptop. I have got it cleaned finally and will be posting a wrap up on the topic I have over there: System Fix bug, XP - SP3
Best Regards
Nawtheasta

#9 frankp316

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Posted 26 December 2011 - 06:52 PM

But if the warning was an indication of an infection, why wouldn't AVG do what it is supposed to do and block the infection instead of giving a confusing and probably useless warning? AVG once upon a time was a quality product and today it just plain sucks. If they would devote their resources to improving detection rates instead of creating gimmicks designed to fool the average user into thinking the product is doing something when in fact it does nothing, it would be a better product.

#10 hamluis

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Posted 26 December 2011 - 07:50 PM

<<But if the warning was an indication of an infection, why wouldn't AVG do what it is supposed to do and block the infection instead of giving a confusing and probably useless warning?>>

FWIW: AV programs...block some malware, remove some that cannot be blocked and already active...and there is no AV program that counteracts/detects everything.

An AV program is only the most basic part of defending a system, along with a firewall.

That's why apps like SAS, Malwarebytes, and others...are used frequently by both the knowledgeable and the infected.

And, beyond those tools...lie all the specialized malware tools which might be used to attempt to clean a system.

The "tool" mentioned is superfluous...since "high memory usage" is somewhat inexact and can easily be seen by any user...by opening Task Manager. The system tends to let users know when anything out of the ordinary occurs regarding memory usage, IME.

Louis

#11 Nawtheasta

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Posted 26 December 2011 - 09:10 PM

Not to over simplify this but I have explained computer protection like this....

Think of a solider standing on a battle field in just a uniform.
(Soldier = computer user, battlefield = internet)
Put a helmet on him ( AV program) and he gains some protection.
Give him a flak vest ( MBAM, SAS ) he gains more protection.
Give him a foxhole ( Firewall) and he is protected further.
Unfortunately he can never be completely safe. Just safer then he was.

I think you see where this is going.
Every tool you properly utilize will make your internet experience safer.
But....
Just like the enemy on the battlefield the bad guys are constantly trying to counter your defenses.
That's why we are fortunate to have a place like BC when we need to bring in the Big Guns.
Best Regards
Nawtheasta

#12 frankp316

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Posted 27 December 2011 - 05:39 AM

<<But if the warning was an indication of an infection, why wouldn't AVG do what it is supposed to do and block the infection instead of giving a confusing and probably useless warning?>>

FWIW: AV programs...block some malware, remove some that cannot be blocked and already active...and there is no AV program that counteracts/detects everything.

An AV program is only the most basic part of defending a system, along with a firewall.

That's why apps like SAS, Malwarebytes, and others...are used frequently by both the knowledgeable and the infected.

And, beyond those tools...lie all the specialized malware tools which might be used to attempt to clean a system.

The "tool" mentioned is superfluous...since "high memory usage" is somewhat inexact and can easily be seen by any user...by opening Task Manager. The system tends to let users know when anything out of the ordinary occurs regarding memory usage, IME.

Louis




Don't you think that what AVG is doing here is deceptive and dishonest? What are users supposed to think when the product that is supposed to protect the system from viruses is issuing a phony baloney warning?

#13 hamluis

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Posted 27 December 2011 - 06:58 AM

Since the relative merits of AVG or any other protective program...are better discussed in the AV, Firewall and Privacy, etc. Forum , and this topic seems to be adequately responded to, I think we should forego further discussion along the path that we have stumbled upon in this topic.

Louis

Edited by hamluis, 27 December 2011 - 07:02 AM.


#14 frankp316

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Posted 27 December 2011 - 11:43 AM

Then move it over there. I remember last year when we talked about IObit's theft from MalwareBytes and BC warned users to not use their product. This is a lot worse than that. AVG is a once decent AV that is still trusted by millions of average users. And instead of keeping up with technology and virus detection methods, these jerks are using deception to fool users into thinking they are getting decent AV protection when they aren't getting that at all. Maybe you need to put a sticky up warning users not to use AVG.

#15 Nawtheasta

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Posted 27 December 2011 - 12:30 PM

I don't know about AVG as I have never used it. Keep in mind that these are companies set up to make a profit. Sales will sell the strong points while it is up to other areas of the company to keep the product up to date and effective.
As it was explained to me all of these AV companies use their own methods of detection.
I don't completely understand this. If your competitor can detect things that your product cannot I would think that R&D would be working to tweak your product so that you were just as effective but it does not always seem to be the case. In other industries if a company is having problems and starting a downward spiral one of the first areas to be cut is R&D.
I have developed the opinion that the best way to approach this is to find one of the top rated products and buy their paid service. Some people will tell you that the free service is just as good but in all other areas of your life you get what you pay for.
Best Regards
Nawtheasta




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