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Is it important to also use an anti-malware?


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#1 Terri613

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Posted 21 December 2011 - 07:55 PM

I have always just used MS Essentials..i have had no issues, until I got smacked with WINS 7 2012..now as I am researching how to remove it I come across this great site..I am reading all about MLWB, and others...I want to download it and also want to understand what other important programs I should have installed..kinda like a dummys guide to a computer "emergency kit", (the free ones espeicially. I should be doing a seperate ML scan even though I have run MS Essentials, right? Also, I did a system restore for that virus, but I dont feel like it is going to stay away..In fact, I got it a few days ago and did the same thing..It seemed to be triggered by a site I visit daily, and I was on it last nite..so either it returned, or somehow on this site i got it again..I do trust the site,,I dont know if I can reveal the name on here. I am new, so thank you for this forum, and Ho Ho HO.


Mod EDIT,Moved to more appropriate forum.
AntiVirus, Firewall and Privacy Products and Protection Methods

Edited by boopme, 21 December 2011 - 09:23 PM.


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#2 Animal

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Posted 21 December 2011 - 10:44 PM

Wealth of information here: Answers to common security questions: Prevention & Choosing an Anti-virus or Firewall

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A learning experience is one of those things that say, "You know that thing you just did? Don't do that." Douglas Adams (1952-2001)


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#3 quietman7

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Posted 22 December 2011 - 01:06 PM

I did a system restore for that virus, but I dont feel like it is going to stay away

System Restore is the feature that protects your computer by monitoring a core set of system and application files and by creating backups (snapshots saved as restore points) of vital system configurations and files before changes are made. These restore points are stored in the System Volume Information (SVI) folder and can be used to "roll back" the computer to a clean working state in the event of a problem. This makes it possible to undo harmful changes to your system configurations including registry modifications made by software or malware by reverting the operating systems configuration to an earlier date. Keep in mind that System Restore will back up the good as well as malevolent files, so when malware is present on the system it may be included in some restore points.

Sometimes this method of recovery works but other times it may not since System Restore was not designed to be a virus or malware removal tool. Whether it will be successful depends on what type of infection you are dealing with, what damage the malware has already caused, whether it disabled System Restore and if not, what is restored during the process.

This is what mvps.org has to say:
Can I use System Restore to remove virus or malware infection?

NO. System Restore was not designed to be a virus or spyware removal tool and should not be depended on.


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#4 Required Field

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Posted 22 December 2011 - 03:11 PM

Sounds a bit like closing the barn door after the cows are already out. My quick answer to the original question would be "yes," along with the link provided by Animal, and then after reading the rest, I would suggest posting here http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/forum103.html , because you are clearly still having issues. I would also offer that lots of malware actually hide in the system restore. I tend to disable it before proceeding with malware removal just in case. Just my two cents.
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#5 quietman7

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Posted 22 December 2011 - 08:44 PM

lots of malware actually hide in the system restore. I tend to disable it before proceeding with malware removal just in case.


Disabling System Restore as the first step when attempting to clean a system or when scanning for malware is not advisable. Unfortunately, some anti-virus vendors still recommend doing this before attempting malware removal and many folks follow that advice. This is really not a good practice when dealing with infected computer systems. Turning System Restore off and then turning it back on has some risk associated with it since that feature does not always work as intended. Further, there is always a possibility of something going wrong during the malware removal process and you end up with more problems. If an incident renders your system problematic or unbootable, you can use System Restore to return it to a previous working state. Without a restore point to fall back on, you are left with a limited means of restoring your system to a usable condition. Disabling this feature could mean having to perform a repair install (or reformat in worst case scenarios) if you're unable to fix any problems which System Restore may be able to correct. Although System Restore is not always 100% guaranteed to work all the time, it at least gives you another option before resorting to more drastic measures.


Once the system is clean, you can Create a New Restore Point and use Disk Cleanup to remove all but the newly created Restore Point to prevent accidental reinfection.
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#6 Required Field

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Posted 23 December 2011 - 10:58 AM

I suppose I should have added that I also tend to make a clone of the drive before doing anything with the system at all. That way, if removal of the virus causes instability, I can always put it back the way it was before I made changes. But yeah, I disable the system restore on XP machines. Pretty much most of the time. That's just my method. :)
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#7 quietman7

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Posted 23 December 2011 - 11:36 PM

I suppose I should have added that I also tend to make a clone of the drive before doing anything with the system at all.

Doing that is a very good practice.
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