Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Computer shutting off randomly


  • Please log in to reply
35 replies to this topic

#1 vhatever

vhatever

  • Members
  • 31 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:33 AM

Posted 19 December 2011 - 12:40 AM

Well, I'm lost. The computer does not appear to be overheating(I have progam that detects heat). I can use the computer in safe mode for days on end drawing as much power as I possibly can in safe mode and it never shuts off, so i can't believe power supply is an issue either. Yet I've even had it shut off while loading/booting up the "windows" screen during restart when NOT in safe mode.

Completely confused on what to do. scanned with avg, avast, malwarebytes, use zone alarm firewall.

Edited by hamluis, 01 January 2012 - 08:26 AM.
Moved from XP to Internal Hardware.


BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Allan

Allan

  • BC Advisor
  • 8,589 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Jersey
  • Local time:09:33 AM

Posted 19 December 2011 - 07:40 AM

Open msconfig and on the General tab choose "selective startup" (uncheck all three items) and reboot. Does the problem still occur? If not, start adding items back to msconfig one or two at a time, rebooting after each change, until the problem reappears and you'll have identified the offending process. This is clearly a time consuming procedure, but it is the best way to determine if some process loading with the system is the cause of your problem.
After you've isolated the cause, do not use msconfig to permanently disable the process. Instead, if it is a service go to START - RUN and type: services.msc (then press enter) and disable the service OR, if it a program, you can download & run a simple app such as Mike Lin's Startup Control Panel (http://www.mlin.net/StartupCPL.shtml) to enable, disable, or otherwise manage startup programs.

#3 vhatever

vhatever
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 31 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:33 AM

Posted 19 December 2011 - 11:27 AM

Ya, I suppose I should mention I've tried that previously. Disabled everything on startup. It doesn't seem to change anything.

To me what doesn't make sense is that sometimes it shuts off during booting up, with the windows loading screen. I didn't change any drivers and I added no new hardware before it started happening. So i don't understand how it could be drivers, overheating, or power supply. Makes no sense to me why safe mode is perfectly fine.

#4 Allan

Allan

  • BC Advisor
  • 8,589 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Jersey
  • Local time:09:33 AM

Posted 19 December 2011 - 12:00 PM

The fact that it occurs only in normal mode (as opposed to safe mode) would seem to indicate a software problem (that includes drivers). However, if you truly have tried a clean boot as described in my first post and the problem still occurs, we are left with hardware. You can try a couple of things I guess:

To check the ram, download memtest (http://memtest.org/). Burn it to a cd using a dedicated .iso burning utility (http://www.petri.co.il/how_to_write_iso_files_to_cd.htm), make sure the cd drive is at the top of the boot order in bios, then boot to the newly created cd and run the utility.

To check the HD, boot to the recovery console and run chkdsk /r

#5 vhatever

vhatever
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 31 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:33 AM

Posted 19 December 2011 - 02:15 PM

Wouldn't ram and/or the HD be stressed enough in safe mode to get the shutdown to happen? Considering in a non-safe mode reboot the computer sometimes shuts off when booting up. Apparently doesn't take much. I tried chkdsk before anyway, but can't do the mem test for thwe time being.
Maybe i can try with pulling out and running with just one stick.

Edited by vhatever, 19 December 2011 - 02:18 PM.


#6 AustrAlien

AustrAlien

    Inquisitor


  • Members
  • 6,772 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cowra NSW Australia
  • Local time:11:33 PM

Posted 19 December 2011 - 02:34 PM

If the computer is simply turning off without warning, ... as you have described it to do ... then I believe you have already identified the most likely problem as being over-heating. You would do well to focus on over-heating as the most likely cause of your problem.

You wrote: "The computer does not appear to be overheating(I have progam that detects heat)."
Please elaborate on how you are determining that over-heating is not the cause of the problem, and the temperature range that you are seeing reported.

We have no information to work with: We don't even know whether it is a laptop or a desktop PC.

Please Publish a Snapshot using Speccy, and post a link to it in this thread: It is a convenient and accurate way of providing us with details of your computer specifications.
AustrAlien
Google is my friend. Make Google your friend too.

Posted Image

#7 vhatever

vhatever
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 31 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:33 AM

Posted 19 December 2011 - 03:24 PM

It's a desktop PC, and I'm not sure what other information would even be useful. I really don't think it's possibly overheating. I've had the computer turned off for long periods of time and then tried it in normal boot mode and had it shut off during loading windows. I forget the name of the program I have but it shows fan speed and system temps and such and it's one of the first things I checked when this happened. Temps were fine and the same they have been in the past.

Edited by vhatever, 19 December 2011 - 03:27 PM.


#8 AustrAlien

AustrAlien

    Inquisitor


  • Members
  • 6,772 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cowra NSW Australia
  • Local time:11:33 PM

Posted 19 December 2011 - 03:34 PM

I've had the computer turned off for long periods of time and then tried it in normal boot mode and had it shut off during loading windows.

When there is a severe over-heating problem .... that is what happens. It takes a mere few seconds for the CPU to overheat and shut the system down. Regardless of how cool things might have been when you pressed the ON button, if the contact/thermal conductivity layer between the CPU and the heatsink fails to transfer sufficient heat quickly enough ... then the CPU will overheat in a very short (matter of seconds) time.
AustrAlien
Google is my friend. Make Google your friend too.

Posted Image

#9 vhatever

vhatever
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 31 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:33 AM

Posted 19 December 2011 - 04:14 PM

In normal boot mode it can shut off during loading windows screen, 5 minutes after loading windows, or an hour or two after loading windows and I've been using the computer the entire time. I think an overheating problem would be way less random.

#10 abauw

abauw

  • Members
  • 951 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Kebun Kelapa
  • Local time:08:33 PM

Posted 19 December 2011 - 04:18 PM

Please check your computer heat first as overheating could trigger your mainboard to do autoshutdown.

:guitar: Take me to a place where time is frozen
You don't have to close your eyes to dream :busy:
You can find escape inside this moment :smash:
And I will follow  :whistle:


#11 AustrAlien

AustrAlien

    Inquisitor


  • Members
  • 6,772 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cowra NSW Australia
  • Local time:11:33 PM

Posted 19 December 2011 - 04:39 PM

Let's see how well your cooling system is working.

CPU overheating causes a system to turn off immediately, with no error message, usually by default at 70°C.
Use something like Speedfan http://majorgeeks.com/SpeedFan_d337.html
to monitor the CPU temperature, and if you see temps in excess of 50°C, then you may have cause for concern, and if temps approach 70°C, then you have found the problem.

Other tools:
Everest: http://majorgeeks.com/download4181.html
Motherboard Monitor: http://majorgeeks.com/download.php?det=311

Warning: Take great care not to cause damage to components by overheating when running Toast.

A quick way to test this is to download and run toast.exe http://majorgeeks.com/Toast_d867.html
This will run the CPU at 100%. If you can run this for 20 minutes without any problem, then your CPU cooling system is fine.

If you have two processors, you will need to run two versions of Toast: Please make a new folder on your Desktop and then copy the file, Toast, and paste it in the new folder. You should now have two versions of Toast: One on your Desktop and another in the new folder on the Desktop.

If the thermal paste contact between the CPU and the heatsink is broken, temps may appear to be "normal", under most conditions.
However, when the CPU is heavily utilised, the temps can spike upward sharply, causing the system to turn off.

Let us know what temperatures are reported while running toast.exe for 20 minutes.

Edited by AustrAlien, 19 December 2011 - 04:54 PM.

AustrAlien
Google is my friend. Make Google your friend too.

Posted Image

#12 vhatever

vhatever
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 31 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:33 AM

Posted 19 December 2011 - 06:38 PM

Look, this isn't my first rodeo in owning a computer. I know it's not overheating. My fan/temp monitor doesn't work entirely when in safe mode and I'm not going to dick around with a bunch of useless programs when I know that's not the problem. The majority of the time it will not even stay working for 20 minutes outside of safe mode to get readings. I'm also not a big fan of running things that "could destroy computer components".

The overheating thing is a complete red herring. first thing I checked MONTHS ago.

Edited by vhatever, 19 December 2011 - 06:39 PM.


#13 caperdog

caperdog

  • BC Advisor
  • 954 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Nova Scotia
  • Local time:09:33 AM

Posted 19 December 2011 - 09:04 PM

well, here's my 2 cents: since safe mode runs fine I would suspect the video driver. in safe mode windows uses a generic vga driver.

#14 vhatever

vhatever
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 31 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:33 AM

Posted 19 December 2011 - 10:24 PM

well, here's my 2 cents: since safe mode runs fine I would suspect the video driver. in safe mode windows uses a generic vga driver.



Ya, I figured the same thing actually awhile back, so I reinstalled the newest nvidia drivers. I wonder if I should try to find some old video drivers from over a year ago and see if that works. Maybe the new drivers are causing the conflict somehow.


Ok, i decided to unistall the drivers completely for the video card and just stick with basic VGA. So far so good.

Edited by vhatever, 19 December 2011 - 10:46 PM.


#15 vhatever

vhatever
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 31 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:33 AM

Posted 20 December 2011 - 12:32 AM

After a couple hours the "normal boot with no nvidia drivers" attempt failed and the computer shutdown.


Really makes no freaking sense at this point.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users