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Which OS


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#1 out4trout

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Posted 05 December 2011 - 11:29 AM

I am considering moving from Windows Xp and would like to go with something else, but cannot decide what will work best for me. Could someone point me in a direction? I use my computer primarily for work, so I need to be able to use Microsoft office, word perfect, outlook, Firefox, adobe, and a couple odd and end programs. Lastly I do have a camera and USB sticks that need to talk to the computer as well. What OS would be best for me? I am not a computer guru or anything and I do not want to put a lot of money into this transition. I am looking for something that is secure, fast, user friendly, and STABLE. Any help??

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#2 1002 Richard S

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Posted 05 December 2011 - 03:07 PM

Hi,
Try this:
If you have been wondering about Linux and which
distribution you should try you can take this short quiz and
it will give you it's best guess.
http://www.zegeniestudios.net/ldc/ posted by raw, here: http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/topic41001.html

:busy:

#3 stiltskin

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Posted 05 December 2011 - 03:12 PM

If you need Office, WordPerfect, Outlook and any Adobe products other than flash and Acrobat Reader, stick to Windows.

You could probably find ways to do it. Like using Crossover Office, for example. Or you could buy VMWare or run VirtualBox, but you'd need to run Windows inside of those (Windows actually runs better in a virtual machine on linux than it does when it owns the whole machine - I know because I have one installed on a netbook.) But if you need to run Windows-specific programs you're better off using Windows.

You can get around some of those (the word processing part; I have no idea about the "odds and ends" since I don't know what those are; the Adobe part depends). You may or may not be able to do similar with Evolution to replace Outlook, but it's going to depend on how it's set up (on a domain or not, for instance).

#4 buddy215

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Posted 05 December 2011 - 03:29 PM

I agree with stiltskin....stick with Windows and play with Ubuntu or other Linux until you have a working
knowledge of what you can do with it.
You should have no problem moving to Windows 7, though. Especially on a new computer. :)
“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”

#5 out4trout

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Posted 05 December 2011 - 03:42 PM

great thanks for the help. I don't NEED outlook provided there is a suitable alternative and it looks like the Evolution program is identical to Outlook, is that the case? I did the quiz and it looks like Ubuntu, Kubuntu, OpenSuSE, and Mandriva. Any opinion between them? For instance is one "faster" than another, or is one easier to install or transition to than another? I think the only real "problem I will have is all my work documents are created in Wordperfect so unless wordperfect works well if you use the WINE program, I will need to figure out a workaround. Any thoughts?
Thanks!

#6 buddy215

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Posted 05 December 2011 - 05:30 PM

Ubuntu 10.04.3 is a Long Term Support (LTS) that I would recommend as having the
fewest issues...if any. I've used since 04/ 2010. It will be supported until 04/2013.
Next April the newest LTS will be released. Note the one year overlap that provides ample time
to upgrade.
Ubuntu 10.04.3 LTS (Lucid Lynx)
“Every atom in your body came from a star that exploded and the atoms in your left hand probably came from a different star than your right hand. It really is the most poetic thing I know about physics...you are all stardust.”Lawrence M. Krauss
A 1792 U.S. penny, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington, reads “Liberty Parent of Science & Industry.”

#7 out4trout

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Posted 05 December 2011 - 05:34 PM

Great thanks. Any difference or recommendation between the 32 bit and 64?

#8 BlackSpyder

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Posted 05 December 2011 - 06:35 PM

64bit recognizes more than 3.5Gb of RAM but x64 can tend to be problematic with drivers and flash 9or rather it was the last time I used an x64 linux OS)

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#9 out4trout

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Posted 05 December 2011 - 08:16 PM

so 32 is the way to go? no big difference in speed or anything?

#10 Clark76

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Posted 05 December 2011 - 10:01 PM

The difference in speed would depend on how much RAM you currently have installed on the computer. A 32 bit system can only read roughly 3.5Gb of RAM. I personally would not bother going with a 64 bit version unless you have 8GB of RAM since if you have 4 or less you are not going to notice a difference. With 6gb there is not going to be much difference either unless you use some pretty resource intense programs. It just would be a waste to not use 8Gb though :P

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#11 out4trout

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Posted 05 December 2011 - 10:16 PM

so 32 bit is the way to go! (since I dont have all that RAM!
thanks!

#12 myrti

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Posted 06 December 2011 - 08:25 AM

Hi,

there will definitely be equivalent tools for you on the linux distributions. Eg instead of Microsoft Office, there will be Libre Office, instead of outlook you may use thunderbird or evolution. Firefox is available on linux and the basic tools of adobe are too. If you want to use Adobe Photoshop (and don't need it on a professional level), gimp may be a good alternative for you that runs on linux. All those programs are free for you to test (obviously) and except evolution they also are available for Windows, so you can try and take a look at them without installing linxu necessarily.
Obviously there will be differences between the programs you currently used and the alternatives you mentioned. Things will be similar, but definitely not the same and you will need to take some time to get used to them before you get back to your old productivity.

The only difference between Kubuntu and Ubuntu is the display-manager. They both use roughly the same amount of resources nowadays. If you are looking for some leightweight alternatives, take a look at the pages of xubuntu and lubuntu, which run display managers that need less resources. All of these distributions are ubuntu-distributions, meaning they come with the same tools available and you essentially only need to decide by resources used and the look you like best. They will also offer different default programs, but you can always download other additional programs (such as firefox and thunderbird for example) if you do not like the default app.

(The same is also true for OpenSuse and Mandriva of course, but I know less about those, so I can't guarantee for anything.)

regards myrti

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#13 1002 Richard S

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Posted 06 December 2011 - 03:10 PM

Ubuntu is a very good starting point. Lots of hardware compatibility, but what you could do is d/l a few 'live CDs/DVDs of the o/s you've identified and see what you think.
The live CD/DVD will run a lot slower that an install so don't let that put you off.

Try a few in 'try' mode & see what you like & what likes your hardware & graphics card.

But ... enjoy!

#14 out4trout

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Posted 07 December 2011 - 02:33 AM

Great advice! Thanks to all. i am currently getting everything backed up and I think I am going to try the umbuntu and the xbuntu and decide which is better for me. Thank you!

#15 A Future Pilot

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Posted 11 December 2011 - 04:48 PM

You might also like Linux Mint...it's based on Ubuntu, but has a different look to it (especially now with Gnome 3) I personally very much prefer it over Ubuntu :)




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