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BIOS settings


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4 replies to this topic

#1 hardini

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Posted 10 November 2011 - 04:19 PM

Upon starting up my PC after a couple months downtime and having it cleaned at a shop prior to startup; i failed to get a signal to multiple known working monitors. It was suggested at another shop that it was likely a bad stick of RAM instead of my assumption that the video card was not seated properly. The tech told me to remove all RAM and insert each into the first slot and try to boot with each one individually to find the bad stick. He also gave me a CMOS battery and suggested i replace it while i was in there.

Upon opening up the case i found that the video card fan was amazingly dirty-so i blew it out and wiped down the card, replaced the battery, and proceeded to perform the steps i was instructed to do. I attained a boot screen with every stick as well as with the return of all sticks to there original slots as if nothing was ever wrong. However, realized that during startup with testing the second stick the boot screen asked whether to go to setup to change BIOS settings or startup using default settings. Without thinking i chose "startup using default settings"

3 questions:

1. dd i hurt anything by starting up the system without proper settings
2. how do i make sure the BIOS settings are correct and
3. could a dusty video card really have prevented a signal to the monitor?

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#2 Allan

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Posted 10 November 2011 - 04:23 PM

1. No
2. Is the system working correctly? If so, it's fine
3. Yes

#3 Andrew

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Posted 10 November 2011 - 04:28 PM

When you replaced the CMOS battery you cleared the CMOS memory (where BIOS settings are stored) and so it's not at all surprising that the BIOS prompted you afterwards. The defaults used in most BIOSes are quite safe for the hardware, though possibly less than ideal from a performance standpoint since they are generally very conservative. If you've never fiddled with the BIOS settings before then it's likely that the defaults are what you've always been using, so they just got re-loaded.

A dusty video card, especially if it's very dusty, can certainly cause the video card to fail to operate properly. Everything from heat to an obstructed fan, which are caused by dust buildup, can fry a video card or at least prevent it from running properly.


Edit to add:
If it ain't broke anymore, stop fixin' it!

Edited by Andrew, 10 November 2011 - 04:29 PM.


#4 Allan

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Posted 10 November 2011 - 04:38 PM

Just to clarify, simply removing and replacing the cmos battery does not necessarily reset the bios to default settings.

#5 hardini

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Posted 10 November 2011 - 04:43 PM

Awesome, thanks ya'll.




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