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How do I limit internet access for a child?


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#1 blub

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Posted 02 November 2011 - 01:45 PM

What is the best way to limit a user's internet access to only certain websites? The user in question is a young child (not mine) and I want to limit his internet access to protect the computer from malware. I don't give a crap what he sees since his parents obviously don't care. BTW, the computer isn't mine, but I'm in charge of security and fixing it when there's a problem, it belongs to my grandma.

The computer is Windows 7 and I'm going to attempt to have the child use his own user account which will be limited.

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#2 Didier Stevens

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Posted 02 November 2011 - 03:07 PM

You can use Windows 7 Parental Controls to further limit what the user can do: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/products/features/parental-controls

And with Windows Live Family Safety you can control which web sites are accessed: http://explore.live.com/windows-live-family-safety

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#3 quietman7

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Posted 02 November 2011 - 06:38 PM

Resources for Parents: Child Safety on the Internet:
Resources for Parents: Social Networking and Children:
Other Parental Tools to restrict access to the Internet:
Tools for parents who want to know what instant messengers kids are using, see who your kids are chatting with on MySpace and what pages they are looking at:
Note: Not all parental tools are free but some parents find them worth the price so I included them in case you want to pursue that avenue. I personally would recommend those already noted by Didier Stevens but some of the freebies are excellent

Also keep in mind that some parental tools are considered Keylogging tools and may at times be detected by your anti-virus as a "RiskTool", "Hacking tool, or "Potentially unwanted tool". Anti-virus programs cannot distinguish between "good" and "malicious" use of such programs, therefore they may alert the user or even remove them. Such programs may have legitimate uses in contexts where an authorized user, parent or administrator has knowingly installed it. Potentially unwanted does not necessarily mean the file is malware or a bad program. It means it has the potential for being misused by others.
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#4 RedDawn

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Posted 02 November 2011 - 11:48 PM

I've had a positive experience with Norton Online Family (Link in QM7's post above).

http://www.techsupportalert.com/best-free-parental-Filter.htm

#5 ichito

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 09:02 AM

Kurupira Web Filter...many features and easy to use
http://www.kurupira.net/en/software_webfilter_block_websites_parentalcontrol_download.php
Some screenshots
http://www.kurupira.net/en/software_webfilter_block_websites_parentalcontrol_print.php

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#6 WallyWest

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Posted 05 November 2011 - 09:04 AM

I have a couple of suggestions:

1. OpenDNS - has filtering options based on website categories that you can set up as you want it. The nice thing about it is you don't have to install anything on your PC (well, except for the very tiny app "OpenDNS updater" which you have to install if your ISP gives you a dynamic IP address).

2. Windows 7 Parental Controls - not as good as Norton Safety Minder but it's better than nothing.

3. Norton Safety Minder - very good parental control although I have experienced a lot of "Not Responding" errors with my web browsers when I had it installed.

4. If you know which specific sites you want to block or if you simply want to limit the time spent on the Internet, you could try setting up access control and scheduling on your router.

Here are some more suggested ways of parental control which I found helpful.

http://www.techyv.com/questions/how-restrict-kids-certain-sites

#7 nesrinamb

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Posted 06 November 2011 - 01:52 AM

+1 for open dns, it tends to be very good for most peoples wants and needs.

#8 Didier Stevens

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Posted 06 November 2011 - 05:02 AM

OpenDNS is a fine tool, I use it myself, but I've one issue with it: its Dynamic IP client is not designed to be tamper proof.

The OpenDNS updater tool runs in the context of the logged on user, in our example the limited user account. So the limited user can disable the update tool, or even configure another account that gets full access to the Internet.

And from a system administration perspective, I'm not too happy with it too. You've to configure it in every account, that's because the settings are stored in the user accounts profile (Application data\OpenDNS Updater).

Maybe other Dynamic IP clients that support OpenDNS are designed to be tamper proof, but I've not checked.

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