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#1 RevGAM

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Posted 29 October 2011 - 10:10 AM

I don't know what I should say. I'm a Yank living in Indonesia, where I married a local and we have two kids. I'm unemployed, somewhere between novice and expert in IT, having an AASD in programming/systems analysis, plus a few years in the Internet/DSL industry doing a variety of jobs, from ordering lines to remote troubleshooting. I can build a computer and install all the software needed. I taught myself about dealing with malware but I don't consider myself to be much more than a novice at it. Using search engines and networking are big weaknesses for me. I have a love/hate relationship with computers. :)

If you want to know something else, ask. :)

Namaste, Peace & Love,
Glenn


If I have frustrated you, then I must be a student. If I've imparted information or a skill to you, then I must be a teacher. If I've helped you, then I must be a volunteer. If I've touched your life, then I must be happy!
If you had to choose between saving just your family, or saving 10,000 GOOD people (but not your family), what would you choose?


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#2 Budapest

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Posted 06 November 2011 - 06:56 PM

Hello and :welcome: to Bleeping Computer.

Be sure to check out the New User Orientation and the excellent Tutorials.
The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who haven't got it.

—George Bernard Shaw

#3 RevGAM

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 04:24 AM

Thanks for the welcome, Budapest.

I thought I'd add a bit more about my IT experience.

I started computing in 1984, although I had experiences with Apple II+, Tandy and other dinosaurs before that, and made my first program in 8th grade (nothing special or important). By 1987, I was involved in the BBS scene and, around 1990 I opened my first BBS on GBBS. It attained a certain degree of awareness on an international level as I had some users from Europe. I ran that until 1995, also helping a couple other people start their own BBSes. Through these experiences, I learned about changing computer hardware (cards, chips, etc.) and, aside from Apple IIe/c/gs, I also used Commodore, Macintosh and a couple other platforms.

Around the same time, I got into IBM compatibles and became a user of multi-line BBSes, which introduced me to aspects of the Internet, although I was still stuck in text programs. Later on, I used the Internet through Apple IIs, Macintosh and the misnamed "PCs". I became a fan of online text-based RPGs, too, as well as chat rooms.

By 1993, I had completed my programming degree. After that, I had computer-related experience at a number of different companies, but I didn't make use of my degree aside from my BBS.

I worked for GTE Internetworking, COVAD and Rhythms in a variety of positions from customer support and line ordering to remote line troubleshooter and ILEC liaison. I was one of the top line techs in Rhythms and was one of the last employees left when it went belly-up a year after the dot.com crash.

After moving to Indonesia in 2001, I moved away from IT, but I was still involved in it. I either helped with IT or was the IT coordinator at every school I have worked at for the past 10 years. At one school, there was no one taking care of the computers and they were heavily infested with malware, so I taught myself how to get rid of the simpler malware by using safe mode, MSConfig, RegEdit, CMD and services.msc. I also used a variety of antivirus tools, like Stinger, Blacklight, and a few others, as well as malware fighting tools like MBAM and major AV programs - I even dabbled with ClamWin and other oddball programs like SMADAV and PCMAV. I learned to distinguish between the regular programs that are needed by Windows to run, those which are common and those which might be suspect.

I learned to inspect any external USB device with CMD before accessing it through Windows and to turn off autoplay, although that doesn't always prevent malware from jumping! I also learned how to do manual edits of the registry to get rid of the more obvious viruses that kept reasserting themselves, how to turn on services like "run" and "search" and make hidden files and folders be viewable. A few other things, like how to manually get rid of mysteriously locked files and folders that the system claimed it was using by changing ownership and access. Most recently, I learned that more sophisticated malware will not hide in the directories (root or otherwise), but will hide in the recycle bin, recycler, system volume information and system restore folders.

My biggest weakness is probably networking, and I don't consider myself to be very good at malware removal despite my successes at that school. I haven't done any programming in years, either. :(

I am interesting in improving my malware-fighting skills so I may soon apply to join the training program and help others. I like helping others although sometimes I'm too verbose in communication. :(

Glenn

Namaste, Peace & Love,
Glenn


If I have frustrated you, then I must be a student. If I've imparted information or a skill to you, then I must be a teacher. If I've helped you, then I must be a volunteer. If I've touched your life, then I must be happy!
If you had to choose between saving just your family, or saving 10,000 GOOD people (but not your family), what would you choose?


#4 PieLam

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Posted 10 November 2011 - 10:37 PM

I thought I'd add a bit more about my IT experience.

Glenn


Me too, Glenn... Hi. I'm new here too... It seems, though, we have a lot in common..

I too started with computers in the early 1980s. For me, it was 1983, give or take...
That seems like such an eternity ago, don't it?

My first home computer (HC) was an Atari 800 which I loved to use. I began learning the very strange, to me, BASIC programming language on it. I only had a super super slow cassette tape drive for storage...

At that time, my younger cousin (by about 11 years) had a TI-99/4A with only a tape drive as well. I remember us both boasting about the merits of each others' BASICs... After about a year, I sold my Atari and got me a TI-99/4A too. Since the 4A was orphaned by Texas Instruments in 83, expansion was cheap (relatively)... Soon, though, because of this, I was able to move up to those super fast floppy dives. LOL...(compared to cassette tape drives, they were a lot faster)

We, my cousin and I, joined the local TI user group. After about a few years or so in the user group, I was err "chosen" to become the group's BBS system operator (SysOp)... TiBBS of Memphis was now operated by yours truely... I, of course, fell in love with being a SysOp. At first, the TI group membership was right at 300! Sad to say though, many years later the membership dwindled on down to about 15 or so.. Til it finally died out around the mid 1990s... Maybe even a few years beyond 1996, I can't remember exactly... By that time, though, most all of us owned a clone IBM PC. But, we still would meet month after month lugging all the TI equipment, for who knows why...

By then, I had started my own single line IBM BBS. I called it The Full Moon BBS. It was fairly succesful. The old school of hard knox was in full swing! I went from knowing very little about PC hardware to assembling & setting up my own PCs too!

Every bit of all that I've learned was self-taught. A fact that hindered me later on when trying to get a job in the IT field.

I operated my BBS 24/7 for almost 10 years! (~1987-1996) I loved every minute of it, wouldn't trade it for anything... I learned a whole lot in that time!

Now, I'm trying to learn all I can about this crap known as malware... I get frustrated, angry, puzzled, etc...

A lot of things have changed over the years... But, I now realize, I'm still learning, just like in 1983, the only thing that's changed is the subject!

#5 RevGAM

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 07:20 AM

We have, indeed, have similar experiences! Nice to meet you, PieLam. One of my dad's best friends had a TI (not sure which) that I got to play with from time to time. Back then (this was around 1980 I suppose), that computer was amazing. ;)

We spend our whole lives learning, like it or not, so I look at this as a chance to improve. I'm probably going to apply for the team here.

My BBS was the Tower of Babble (ToB), in Milwaukee, WI - not to be confused with the other Tower of Babel that was biblical and located in another state.

I suppose the young 'uns here are probably completely baffled by this talk of old computers and BBSes. ;)

Glenn

Namaste, Peace & Love,
Glenn


If I have frustrated you, then I must be a student. If I've imparted information or a skill to you, then I must be a teacher. If I've helped you, then I must be a volunteer. If I've touched your life, then I must be happy!
If you had to choose between saving just your family, or saving 10,000 GOOD people (but not your family), what would you choose?


#6 PieLam

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 10:35 AM



Nice to meet you too, Glenn. Since I know your 1st name, I'll tell you mine, it's Pierre. (I was born in Canada. My father was a French Canadian from Quebec)

As far as I know, TI only mass produced the one 4A... Well, there was a portable model (80s version of the ladptop?) and a rumored unverified TI 99/8...(vapor-ware at its finest!) The 4a was an amazing little HC for it's time. I enjoyed & used it for many years. I always wanted to learn assembly language, but I endedd up only dabbling in it. :)


I believe we do learn our whole lives too. Learning about and defending against malware/spyware has been a passion of mine these last few years. I too thought about joining the team here. I'll probably apply as soon as I get my 20 posts! :)


Your BBS name sounds familiar for some reason... I might've seen it in one of the numerous weekly FidoNet diff files. I remember browsing them occasionally.


>>I suppose the young 'uns here are probably completely baffled by this talk of old computers and BBSes. ;)

I'm sure of it, Glenn.


#7 RevGAM

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 12:32 PM

Well, Pierre, aside from my BBS and that religious Tower of Babel, I'm not aware of any other BBSes with a similar name, so perhaps you saw something on FidoNet, although I was never hooked into it. There was a BBS list that used to circulate during the years we ran BBSes, and I've seen copies of it on the Internet, too.

I'm slowly working my way to 20 posts, too.

I had a course in assembler, but it was so many years ago I don't remember it anymore. C++ is a fascinating language, but it's also very complex and I wasn't very focused when I studied it.

Are you old enough to predate the changes in regulations in Canada that kept Quebec from breaking away from Canada, or did you grow up in the (current?) era which I heard from another French Canadian has some quaint educational rules about English and French?

Glenn

Namaste, Peace & Love,
Glenn


If I have frustrated you, then I must be a student. If I've imparted information or a skill to you, then I must be a teacher. If I've helped you, then I must be a volunteer. If I've touched your life, then I must be happy!
If you had to choose between saving just your family, or saving 10,000 GOOD people (but not your family), what would you choose?





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