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Layering


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#1 DamSexy

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Posted 28 January 2006 - 05:18 AM

Sorry not to sure if I should post this here but here goes!

I am doing a past examination paper in ICT and have come across this question:

Explain why layering is used in a network system.

First of all can someone tell me what is layering? and why is it used?

Thanx
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#2 dannyboy 950

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Posted 28 January 2006 - 06:17 AM

Assumeing they are talking about network security practices.
Layering is generally the practice of useing many things to protect ones system integrity.
Examples:

Useing a firewall
Useing a Anti-Virus and other programs Ani-Trojan; Anti-Spyware.
Disableing the Guest Account and restricting users.
Turning off un-necessary processes

Each of these is considered a layer.

#3 Snapper

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Posted 28 January 2006 - 11:32 AM

Or do you mean the OSI layers?
application>presentation>session>transport>network>datalink>physical
these are layers that different types of protocols use to break down how data travels throught he network. each has its own job.

there is also a tcp/ip "layer" stack.

do you think this could be what you are looking for?
Google...Google.....browse..read




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