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Cyclic Redundancy Check error when copying from DVDs to hard drive


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#1 Calum

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Posted 24 October 2011 - 07:15 AM

This topic has probably been brought up many times before, but has there ever been a fix for the common copying error, "Data Error: Cyclic Redundancy Check"?

I know there can be many variations of the problem depending on where the data is being copied from and to, but I seem to have have found where the source of my problem is. I have been copying files (copy and paste) from 2 different makes of DVD onto my computer's main hard drive. The makes of DVD are both TDK DVD-R: an older style make with darker blue labels on the disks, and the current make of TDK DVD-R which has light blue labels.

Every time I copy files from the older style DVDs, I get the "Data Error: Cyclic Redundancy Check" notice which stops me from copying any more files from the disc. However, when I copy files from the current make of TDK DVD-R disks, all files are copied without any problems.

Is there a solution to this problem? Can the data from the older style of disks still be copied somehow? I find it strange how the error appears when copying from one make of disk, and doesn't appear when copying from the other. Any advice would be appreciated.

Edited by Calum, 24 October 2011 - 07:16 AM.


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#2 Platypus

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Posted 24 October 2011 - 07:23 AM

When you say older "style", do you mean the disks are actually of greater age? Disks can certainly deteriorate with age. Do the same disks give CRC errors on another computer?

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#3 Calum

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Posted 24 October 2011 - 07:52 AM

When I say older style, I mean the older design of them. They updated the design with a lighter shade of blue, so yes, they are of greater age, but only slightly to those of the current design.

I haven't been able to check whether they make the same errors on another computer.

#4 Calum

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Posted 24 October 2011 - 08:39 AM

I have just bought and downloaded a Java application called JFileRecovery deluxe, which is supposed to recover and copy damaged files. However, I am having problems launching it to use it. Is there anything straightforward?

JFileRecovery deluxe


*Update: Success! I managed at last to launch JFileRecovery and it seems to be copying the damaged files. Perhaps this is the answer for the Cyclic Redundancy Check error when copying files.

Edited by Calum, 24 October 2011 - 08:56 AM.


#5 Platypus

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Posted 24 October 2011 - 05:18 PM

There are a number of utilities that try to reconstruct faulty data by disregarding the CRC errors and doing large numbers of re-reads until a good version of a faulty block can be obtained. They can be quite successful, but it's not a substitute for disk integrity.

CRC errors are not normal - I can't remember when I last saw a CRC error on an optical disk. If the disk(s) show errors on other computers, bin them. It's never wise to depend on only one copy of significant data, especially on media which does deteriorate like optical.

If the problem only occurs on that computer, I'd suggest cleaning the laser lens in the drive, checking the data cable on that drive for loose fit, tarnished contacts or simply a faulty data cable, or try another optical drive.

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