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Computer wont work


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#1 dark messenger

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 08:11 AM

Hi guys, recently moved house, and when I got to my new house, I plug in my computer, turn it on, and nothing. Monitor says VGA Input: No input signal, and when I power up the computer, there is no POST test beep or anything.

Specs if i can remember them..

Mobo: Gigabyte GA-MA78G-DS3H
Ram: 2x 1gb geil ddr2 1066
Processor: AMD phenom of some description, cant remember which one,
GFX card: AMD 3870 turbo
HD: WD 500gb I believe.

Any help would be great!

Ive tried resetting the CMOS by removing the battery, unplugged the ram and gfx card and tried it by putting each back in one at a time, no luck.

I do have a random 8pin plug from the PSU which doesnt plug into anything, but cant find anywhere to plug it in.

None of the front panel LEDs are lit, CD drawer opens, cant tell if HD is working. Its connected with a SATA cable to the SATA2_0 socket on the mobo

I hope I dont need any new components.

Any help would be awesome, thanks :)

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#2 MrBruce1959

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 03:28 PM

Hello and welcome to Bleeping Computer.

If the computer worked before you moved, it is a good possibility that you disrupted something inside the computer case.

It can be a number of things, such as the motherboard shifted its self on the stand-offs and one of those stand offs may be making contact with a near by circuit trace and causing a short.

You could have caused a connection to become loose on the motherboard, such as the 20 or 24 pin ATX power connector.

There is one such 4 pin power connector on the motherboard, sometimes it is a 8 pin connector, it is often labeled 12V and it is often located in close proximity of the CPU, because that is what it actually powers is the CPU.

If you do not see an empty power socket or if you already see a four or eight pin wire coming from the PSU attached to the motherboard, then the one you see dangling around is most likely a spare.

Seriously though, if there is a plug that came loose, it was either not plugged in very well or someone treated your computer very carelessly for a connector to simply come loose like that.

If things do not function after what I suggested, try double checking all the wires leading to connectors, for loose connections, if you do not see anything obvious, try disconnecting each one and plugging it back into the same socket, this takes the mystery out of whether the connector is loose or not.

Also make sure nothing is wrong with the AC power cord or the AC power input port on the back side of the computers power supply, someone may have broken a pin off or damaged the power wire.

Bruce.
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#3 dark messenger

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 04:31 PM

Hi, thanks for the reply. Theres already a cable pluged to the motherboard, 4 pin, and the atx connection is connected securely, as are all the other cables. I can hear the CD drive start up, so i unplugged it, and booted again, and I can hear some noise come from the HD on start up.

The power cord, and pins on back of psu are all in good condition, motherboard is stable and wont budge either.

It was working before I moved, yes. And I stayed at a mates house, and left my computer there, we fell out, and I picked up the computer a few weeks after (From outside his flat, prick) and when I got home, plugged it all in, and since have had the symptoms described above. He knows less about computers than me, and I doubt foul play, but if its broke due to his mistreating it, I will kill him.

Oh also, computer is a custom build, if it makes any difference.

Oh, just realised a fan wasnt plugged in, but that couldve been my fault from an earlier day of trying to fix it :P

But obviously, computer still wont work, power up, and fans work, CD drive works, thats it, maybe hard drive, dont know, it makes a sound

#4 MrBruce1959

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 05:26 PM

If the hard drive is causing than issue with proper powering up of the computer, disconnecting it may solve a possible issue with it preventing the computer from powering up.

Besides that, even if the hard drive was faulty disk wise, the system should still power up and display something on the screen, specially a DOS type notice that there is not bootable media installed, or system can not find any hard drives to boot from. BIOS disk errors are not always worded the same way.

You could try booting the system up one time with the hard drive disconnected, I am primarily interested in your seeing something on the screen even if it suggests pressing F2 or F1 to enter setup.

Please try that and report back the out come, if the system continues to fail to power up fully then there is definitely something wrong that you are missing, or not to start trouble, but the roommate could have had someone do something to your computer out of revenge.

I certainly can not accept that for no apparent reason your computer just up and bit the dust without something being shorted out for it to happen.

Just make sure you think hard about whether you may have caused the issue when you left the fan connector loose, with something else being loose such as a lost motherboard screw floating around in the tower that is now wedged under the motherboard.

Trust me when I say, I have worked on computers where the person left a motherboard or expansion card mounting screw at the bottom of the tower and when they moved, they placed the tower on its side, that screw rolled under the motherboard and got wedged there. When the tower was powered up, the screw caused a short between the motherboard and the computer case. Well you know the rest of the story.

They never noticed it was under there when they did an inspection, but when I removed the motherboard, there it was rolling around the case.

Double check your power switch that goes from the case front to the motherboards header pins, your switch could be faulty. The motherboard book is your best friend here, ti shows which two pins you can manually short out to start the computer without the switch on the case front, try shorting those two pins. They should be marked PW/SW or POWER SWITCH on the motherboard.

Bruce.

Edited by MrBruce1959, 18 October 2011 - 05:32 PM.

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#5 dark messenger

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 06:13 PM

Hi Bruce,

No difference to boot when hd was unplugged. Couldnt see any missing screws from the mobo or anything, didnt take mobo out, as its a bit late at night to be doing that. Shorted the pw switch and the computer turned on (thats really cool, never knew you could do that) and same as before, monitor still says VGA Input: No input signal. I've tried different monitor, doesnt work, tried hooking up to tv with hdmi cable, doesnt work. How frustrating.

#6 MrBruce1959

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 06:56 PM

What concerns me the most is that it appears your system is not even starting up.

A video card problem would often still allow the computer to accomplish a full boot up minus the video.

I am curious if there isn't an issue with the power mains of your current location.

It may sound crazy, but being that I have been in the electronics field for so many years, I have had to learn a lot about how alternating current is produced and how some electronics are sensitive to being power by reverse polarity.

House wiring has a neutral and a hot, hot is the black wire and neutral is the white wire, the plugs on most electronics have one wide prong and one narrow prong and they will only fit in to an outlet one way.

If this is defeated by using power strips that are not keyed that way, or if the wiring is reversed in the outlet, some electronics won't function properly, or won't function at all.

Some power strips have warning lights indicating an ungrounded or reverse polarity status, there is devices available in stores like Radio Shack that can be plugged into an outlet to determine if it is wired correctly.

It would be interesting if you tried a different outlet possible far from the current location of the house to see if a different electrical outlet was wired properly.

Bruce.
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#7 dark messenger

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 03:02 AM

Would this be the same un the uk? I wont be able to try that anytime soon as I overloaded at work, midnight hometime is normal, and I dont drive which makes that test dfficult.
Would it be a dead mobo thats causing the problem?

#8 MrBruce1959

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 06:03 AM

Well it is possible that you have a dead motherboard, however there still remains the question of why would your motherboard just suddenly up and die while it is being transported from one location to another.

Here is what I suggest you try, the CMOS battery which is located on the motherboard can die, once the system is disconnected from the AC power supply, things can get crazy.

A dead battery can cause start up issues.
Make sure your CR2032 battery is a fresh one.

Computers can be the most finicky pieces of electronics you will ever encounter, they can almost convince you that they are possessed by a demon! LOL

I realize you are not in the USA and most likely use 230 volts.
Power is generated the same way all over the world, it is Alternating Current, AC for short.
The frequency range may be different in different countries, but it is still based on the same principle of Hertz, such as the USA is 60 Hertz plus or minus 5 Hertz.

The AC sine wave is basically the letter S laying on its side. The S has a horizontal line running through it at its center.

As AC power is produced, it is done by a the use of a turbine, which rotates and outputs two different electrical fields, a positive one and a negative one.

As the energy produced becomes positive, the sine wave raises up over the horizontal line until it peaks out, like a mountain, then as the energy goes more negative, the line drops down to the line and then below it like a valley and it peaks at the same level it peaked at the positive mountain peak.

This process in the USA happens 60 times a second, the line goes from left to right, peaking and dropping, peaking and dropping up and down that horizontal line forming what looks like one S after another connected to one S after another. Too bad the keyboard does not have a characters that allows me to show you what it looks like.

Check this web site it tell you about Sine Waves http://www.electroniq.net/electronic-tutorials/ac-and-dc-electrical-signals.html

The point I am making with all this gibberish is that even in your country reverse polarity can be a problem with some electronics.

Bruce.
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#9 dark messenger

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 07:18 AM

Can I get those batteries from anywhere, or specialised places only?

#10 MrBruce1959

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 06:44 PM

You can go to any store that sells electronics, specially computers.

This battery can be ordered on line as well.

Try one of these links: http://www.google.com/#q=cr2032+battery&hl=en&prmd=imvnsr&source=univ&tbm=shop&tbo=u&sa=X&ei=lGCfTqn4KYj50gGNyO35BA&ved=0CKMBEK0E&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.,cf.osb&fp=825eee6c2871e995&biw=1024&bih=571

Bruce.
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#11 dark messenger

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 06:56 PM

Cheers, I'll have to wait a few weeks for that, as not a penny to my name until payday.
Anything else to check in the mean time? My mate said it might be a knackered power pack?

Cheers

#12 MrBruce1959

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 07:13 PM

it might be a knackered power pack?

By power pack, I presume you mean power supply.

It is very possible, it does happen.

I suggest to help you read up on computer problems and find possible solutions you start off with exploring this web site.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/home/index.html There is information about power supplies, why they would fail and how to determine if they have failed.

It includes information about video card problems as well.

Bookmark it, you'll find that it comes in handy someday.

If your PSU is the cause, you'll have to try buying one at a store that accepts returns just in case the new power supply does not fix the problem, you can bring it back for a refund.

Bruce.
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#13 dark messenger

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Posted 22 October 2011 - 07:05 PM

Thanks, I'll look into it on my next day off work. I'll get back to you then :)

#14 MrBruce1959

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Posted 22 October 2011 - 07:12 PM

:thumbup2:

Bruce.
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