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click2fix phone scam


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#1 William Dorr

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 12:52 AM

A friend of my sister got a phone call from a man with an Indian accent who said he represented a company named click2fix. He said she had a virus, yadda yadda yadda, and had her go through all kinds of steps to "verify" that she was infected. He had her visit a "cleaning" website, which then of course infected her computer, and then he started asking for a credit card number to remove it. Long story short, she's come to me for help, and I haven't found any mention of this kind of infection on bleepingcomputer.com, so I'm wondering if anybody else has heard of this or knows what specific bug they're inflicting on people. A Google search has turned up that these guys have been scamming in the UK for at least a year now, but nobody's mentioned the name of any specific virus or trojan that might be used in this extortion. If I can get access to the computer (might be difficult, they live quite a ways away, but they called me because they know I'm good with this stuff) I'll run Malwarebytes and report back here what it found, but for now any experiences you all might have had or pointers in the right direction would be appreciated.

Thanks.

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#2 Cyberbear

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 01:28 AM

I am technician, and I have read about and seen some of these kinds of scams in action.
Sounds like the typical phishing (fishing) scam, and the story doesn't just happen for what you are talking about. I have seen this happen on other subjects of matter--where as they call you, and ask you to give back your personal information to verify if what they have is correct when in fact they have no information at all.

Not only does this happen in EMail scams, these scammer (con-artist) are now calling people's houses using computer-phone-accounts with numbers that are disconnected--so are the telemarketers doing that with fake numbers. Anyone who calls you and asks for personal information like that is definitely a scammer.

It seems like the scammers who put FAKE virus banners on a person's screen are reaching out through the phone to get you to visit their sites. I call/email websites all the time and leave messages and none have ever asked me for my credit card when they called me back. And especially if you have never contacted these people, this definitely is a scam.
The infection is the Cleaning Software they tricked her to download and most likely is just putting false warnings on her computer to get her download fake Anti-virus software. This has been going on for a while now.

See if you can call back the number that lists on her caller ID. Most likely the says it is disconnected. You should report it to the police/FBI. Contact ICANNN.org ( Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers) about this and report.

If you want to do some investigating, go to www.dnsstuff.com and submit their site that she visited and see who their Registrar is, and contact the registrar about the scam so they can shut their site down. I, personally have contacted registrars on various occasions to report violations to have sites shut down.

Lastly get a copy of malwarebytes on her computer and run it to see if it finds the program.

Clicktofix is a fake, it's not listed on the web anywhere as a company or website, What is the name of the site they told her to visit? Google that site, and put "scam" with the name in Google Search.
See if anyone else reports it or talks about what they did if they had the same experience.

Les

Edited by Cyberbear, 18 October 2011 - 02:06 AM.


#3 kingtron

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 11:38 PM

A friend of my sister got a phone call from a man with an Indian accent who said he represented a company named click2fix. He said she had a virus, yadda yadda yadda, and had her go through all kinds of steps to "verify" that she was infected. He had her visit a "cleaning" website, which then of course infected her computer, and then he started asking for a credit card number to remove it. Long story short, she's come to me for help, and I haven't found any mention of this kind of infection on bleepingcomputer.com, so I'm wondering if anybody else has heard of this or knows what specific bug they're inflicting on people. A Google search has turned up that these guys have been scamming in the UK for at least a year now, but nobody's mentioned the name of any specific virus or trojan that might be used in this extortion. If I can get access to the computer (might be difficult, they live quite a ways away, but they called me because they know I'm good with this stuff) I'll run Malwarebytes and report back here what it found, but for now any experiences you all might have had or pointers in the right direction would be appreciated.

Thanks.


my advice is a clean re-install, you never know if part of the trojan remained in the system, no virus database is fully up to date. These guys are also very sophisticated, my client received a phone call with a simple survey where they gather all information about his machine.. 3 days later they followed up with a repair phone call.. an average person loses 850$ per succesful scam.. more info here




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