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Liquid cooling systems on the MOBO


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#1 Booh-kitty

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Posted 17 October 2011 - 09:46 PM

I'm shopping around for a new MOBO. A lot of the ones available come with thermal dissipation systems built into the MOBO.

Was just wondering if any one around here has any experience with those? What do you think about it.

My main concern is the lack of power sockets for a CPU/ chassis fan if the integrated system should fail.
Whether you think you can or can't, either way you are right.
-Henry Ford

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#2 DJBPace07

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 12:27 PM

I've never seen a motherboard with northbridge or southbridge liquid cooling built into the motherboard. High end models of current motherboards sometimes have large heatsinks over some of the more hot components. If the CPU/Chassis fans fail and they are plugged into the motherboard, the motherboard will either see it has no connection to the fan or it will see a connection but no fan RPM's. In the case of the CPU fan, the motherboard will either refuse to boot without a fan, trip an alarm, or your CPU will heat up until the CPU automatically shuts itself down. Case fans are different, they can be plugged into the motherboard or attached directly to the PSU using a molex connector. If the case fans are plugged into the PSU, there is no way to tell without looking at the fans or observing higher temperatures within the case.

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