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Cannot run chkdsk upon restarting Windows XP


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#1 NadezhdaHope

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 09:18 PM

I’ve had my computer for four years and never run chkdsk on the OS (Windows XP). But the computer is getting slow and I figured it would be a good idea. Well, I can’t run it.

I right click the C drive to bring up properties, select the option to “check now” under the tools tab, check the two boxes to “automatically fix file system errors” and “scan for and attempt recovery of bad sectors.” I click start and it gives me the usual message, “The disk check could not be performed because the disk check utility needs exclusive access to some Windows files on the disk. These files can be accessed only by restarting Windows. Do you want to schedule this disk check to occur the next time you restart the computer?” I click Yes, of course.

... But chkdsk NEVER runs when I restart the computer. I’ve tried to run it from command prompt (run->cmd) by typing in chkdsk c: /r and command prompt in safe mode and I get the same message about restarting - it NEVER runs when I restart. Never.

The only thing I can think of that is different about my computer is the initial boot screen. Several years ago I had a virus in the MBR and whatever forum I went on for help (they fixed it), I ended up doing something (I have no idea what - long time ago) so that now the initial boot screen gives me the option to boot Windows XP Professional OR the Microsoft Windows Recovery Console or if I press f8, I can get all the other boot up options. I don't really think this is part of the problem but I thought I'd mention it just in case.

Um, I’m also not a “computer person” as it were, so if you could simplify any advanced computer jargon in your replies, that would be great. Thank you! :)

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#2 .X.

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 09:46 PM

As to why it's not running, I don't know but you can run it by choosing Microsoft Windows Recovery Console. When you get to the prompt, type chkdsk /r.

#3 €nígмä

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 09:47 PM

Try the following in command line. (windows key+r > type in CMD > press enter)

chkdsk /f
chkdsk /x

restart computer.

note: you may get the following message: "Chkdsk cannot run because the volume is in use by another
process. Would you like to schedule this volume to be
checked the next time the system restarts? (Y/N)" Type Y and press enter.

Edited by €nígмä, 09 October 2011 - 09:49 PM.

Nosce te ipsum.

#4 noknojon

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 09:49 PM

I've tried to run it from command prompt (run->cmd) by typing in chkdsk c: /r

Just try chkdsk /r without the c: you have been using.
If you still have your XP CD it may pay to also run sfc /scannow to check for missing or altered files -

Regards -
EDIT - You can also use the commands given in the post above -

Edited by noknojon, 09 October 2011 - 09:51 PM.


#5 €nígмä

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 09:53 PM

Just try chkdsk /r without the c: you have been using.
If you still have your XP CD it may pay to also run sfc /scannow to check for missing or altered files -

Regards -
EDIT - You can also use the commands given in the post above -
[/quote]

I'd strongly suggest the /f switch (or /x in case you need to unmount the volume.)
sfc /scannow
is also a good one. You can run this command within the OS, or in safe mode without a winxp cd. :thumbsup:

Edited by €nígмä, 09 October 2011 - 09:53 PM.

Nosce te ipsum.

#6 NadezhdaHope

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 11:30 PM

Whether I try chkdsk /f, chkdsk /x, or chkdsk /r in the command prompt, it doesn't matter. I get the same result:

"The type of the file system is NTFS.
Cannot lock current drive.

Chkdsk cannot run because the volume is in use by another process. Would you like to Schedule this volume to be checked the next time the system restarts? <Y/N>"

I always click yes and it still will not start when I reboot. I ran sfc /scannow in the OS itself (with the windows XP cd) and it didn't find anything.

It is getting quite late so I will run chkdsk in the recovery console tomorrow and report back my results. Thanks for the help so far.

#7 €nígмä

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Posted 09 October 2011 - 11:58 PM

Odd problem. Any signs that your computer may be infected?
Nosce te ipsum.

#8 NadezhdaHope

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 08:35 AM

I think my problem may be fixed.

After I ran sfc /scannow last night, I shut down my computer for the night. When I started my computer this morning, chkdsk ran on start up! It was great. I'm not sure what happened last night (I walked away while it was running) but it seems to have fixed the problem. Thanks for the help, everyone!!! :D

#9 €nígмä

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 11:46 PM

I think my problem may be fixed.

After I ran sfc /scannow last night, I shut down my computer for the night. When I started my computer this morning, chkdsk ran on start up! It was great. I'm not sure what happened last night (I walked away while it was running) but it seems to have fixed the problem. Thanks for the help, everyone!!! :D


Great! I'm glad to hear the problem has been resolved!
Nosce te ipsum.

#10 coxchris

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 06:21 AM

Error Message:

Cannot lock current drive.

Explanation:

The utility cannot gain exclusive access to a volume that is the current drive for any process.

User Action:

Check the current drive for all console windows and applications and try again.

via http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc975166.aspx for anyone wow see it

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#11 davidkitfriedman

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Posted 18 April 2018 - 10:42 PM

Just wanted to add here that I had a similar problem with chkdsk not running on bootup and doing sfc /scannow seems to have solved the problem.      

I was seeking to do a chkdsk on an NTFS partition for a Windows XP installation on an old ThinkPad X41. I wanted to resize and shrink down the XP filesystem and partition so that I could put Linux installation(s) on the same disk.

But when I ran ntfsresize the ntfs filesystem failed the integrity check.

In my case it didn't seem to work necessarily right after running sfc /scannow. When I booted it up normally the first time I didn't see any blue background chkdsk screen.

But then I tried rebooting into Safe Mode with Command Prompt. So I pushed F8 and picked that and it seemed to run the chkdsk.

So when I picked Safe Mode with Command Prompt I saw some text scrolling on the screen which looked like perhaps different files being loaded. Then it just paused for a while and I could hear the disk whirring. It was taking longer than before to boot up to the command prompt, but since the disk was whirring I figured something was going on which might be the chkdsk. It wasn't reporting back though that that is what it was doing. Then it rebooted and I saw the BIOS screens again.

I think I booted Windows XP normally and when I did fsutil dirty query c:  it said that it was NOT dirty.

I set the dirty bit again with fsutil dirty set c:  and rebooted again using F8 into Safe Mode with Command Prompt. The same thing happened where it paused after those files scrolled by. I figured if it ran the chkdsk again the second time it wouldn't take as long because any errors would have been fixed the first time.

So again when I did fsutil dirty query c: it said that it was NOT dirty.

I figured it was good to go and when I tried ntfsresize it worked!  :-)
 

One final thing I could add is that in trying to get it to work I found this page on Super User:

 

https://superuser.com/questions/853699/chkdsk-f-r-alternative-in-ubuntu-linux chkdsk /f /r alternative in ubuntu linux

And so one person commented:
 

 

There are so many solutions: use a PE boot disk, windows to go... or Hiren's boot if your computer is old enough. You can even put a Windows installation disk and select recovery. Newer Windows version already has the recovery option builtin and you can just select it from the boot menu. – Lưu Vĩnh Phúc

I checked out Hiren's BootCD, but I didn't understand how it could have a mini Windows XP without some kind of specific relationship with Microsoft? (which I didn't see on the website)

I didn't really understand that.

Maybe some of the intellectual property on Windows XP has expired or something?

I don't know if that would be a re-implementation or not.

What people were saying there on Super User is that there isn't any Linux equivalent to the Microsoft Windows chkdsk. I wondered then if that functionality is actually rather complicated and so it would take a lot of effort to implement it for Linux.

 

David Friedman



#12 joseibarra

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Posted 19 April 2018 - 05:38 AM

When you schedule a chkdsk with error correction (chkdsk  /r) on the next reboot AND then you boot into Safe Mode as the files and things are loading and scrolling by the last thing you are likely to see is MUP.SYS and after that, the chkdsk  with error correction is going to run until it completes.

 

When people see this they assume that there is something wrong with MUP.SYS and go through all kinds of gyrations to try to replace the file but fail to understand that MUP.SYS has already loaded and the system appears to be "hung" on what comes after MUP.SYS and what come after is the check to see if chdsk /r needs to be run.

If the volume is "dirty" of course chkdsk with error correction is going to run on the reboot to try to fix the problem - so if folks use Safe Mode as troubleshooting they will think their system is hung or broken on MUP.SYS when they really just need to wait it out.

 

So while the system appears to be hung on MUP.SYS and if you can see/hear/feel that the HDD is doing something (perhaps an LED access indicator) you need to wait it out as the chkdsk with error correction will finish sooner or later one way or another.

 

When chkdsk runs automatically on a reboot either because XP thinks it needs to (perhaps your NTFS volume has been marked as dirty) or you chose to do it yourself, the results are shown in the Event Viewer Application log.  You need to look there for the chkdsk log and any problems after chkdsk has run.
 
To see the Event Viewer logs, click Start, Settings, Control Panel, Administrative Tools, Event Viewer.
 
A shortcut to Event Viewer is to click Start, Run and in the box enter:
 
%SystemRoot%\system32\eventvwr.msc
 
Click OK to launch the Event Viewer.
 
Look in the Application log for an event sourced by Winlogon, something like:
 
Event Type:    Information
Event Source:    Winlogon
Event Category:    None
Event ID:    1001
Description:
 
Checking file system on C:
 
The type of the file system is NTFS.
A disk check has been scheduled.
Windows will now check the disk.                        
  39070048 KB total disk space.
  25151976 KB in 78653 files.
     48256 KB in 10264 indexes.
         0 KB in bad sectors.
    237080 KB in use by the system.
     65536 KB occupied by the log file.
  13632736 KB available on disk.
Windows has finished checking your disk.

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#13 JohnC_21

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Posted 19 April 2018 - 08:19 AM

There is a linux equivalent to chkdsk but it cannot correct every problem chkdsk does. The command is ntfsfix. It will attempt to fix some errors but what it does, at least in my experience, is force Windows into a chkdsk on the next boot. 

 

At one point BC refused to let a person offer links to Hirens because of the XP mini issue. That went away and I did find an author for a Microsoft Press book reference Hirens. So, it seems Microsoft isn't very worried about it. But, Hirens cannot boot on a UEFI computer. UEFI needs to be set to Legacy or CSM mode before Hirens can boot. I initially thought it could not read GPT disks because XP cannot but Hirens includes a GPT driver which allows Hirens to read and write to GPT disks which are required when booting from UEFI.


Edited by JohnC_21, 19 April 2018 - 08:26 AM.





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