Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

It seems the Recycling Bins on completely different partitions somehow share eachother.


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 Jayson201

Jayson201

  • Members
  • 208 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:05:21 PM

Posted 30 September 2011 - 11:36 PM

I was clearing out my Windows 7 Desktop and other various files from Windows XP last night.
Windows 7 is C:
Windows XP is F:


I'm going to keep it short and sweet
I was throwing stuff from C: onto the Recycling Bin on F:, but even though all the stuff (Gigabytes and Gigabytes) was located on the Recycling Bin of F: it was still using the storage space of C:.

Can somebody make some sense out of this nonsense, I find that extremely interesting :) Thanks

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 .X.

.X.

  • Members
  • 490 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Local time:05:21 PM

Posted 01 October 2011 - 12:30 AM

If you go to recycle bin properties, do you have use one setting for all drives?

#3 Platypus

Platypus

  • Moderator
  • 14,944 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Australia
  • Local time:07:21 AM

Posted 01 October 2011 - 06:09 AM

Files sent to the Recycle Bin do not move. Their entry in the File Directory is simply changed to make their location a folder called Recycler, and a record is kept of the original path entry. That way if you want to get a file back from the Recycle Bin its path is just restored and it appears again where it was shown before. Actually moving files around would be unnecessary and slow.

This means files are always binned on the partition where they belong. Otherwise if you could put files from C: into the Bin on F:, then delete the F: partition, there would be a false record of files you could supposedly get back out of the Recycle Bin, but they would be gone.

Windows manages this behind the scenes, and shows binned files as the contents of the Recycle Bin. When the Recycle Bin is emptied, the File Directory entries are marked as invalid and the file locations are marked as available for use to store other files. That's why the space doesn't become available until the Bin is emptied.

Edited by Platypus, 01 October 2011 - 06:11 AM.

Top 5 things that never get done:

1.


#4 Jayson201

Jayson201
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 208 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:05:21 PM

Posted 02 October 2011 - 08:20 PM

That makes sense I guess :3
I thought it would be something deeper or more complex. or something that's only happened to me. XD
Thanks :3




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users