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Is there something faster than the Speed Light?


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6 replies to this topic

#1 cryptodan

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Posted 23 September 2011 - 01:31 AM

Nothing goes faster than the speed of light. At least, we didn't think so.

New results from the CERN laboratory in Switzerland seem to break this cardinal rule of physics, calling into question one of the most trusted laws discovered by Albert Einstein.

Physicists have found that tiny particles called neutrinos are making a 454-mile (730-kilometer) underground trip faster than they should more quickly, in fact, than light could do. If the results are confirmed, they could throw much of modern physics into upheaval.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2011/09/22/strange-particles-may-travel-faster-than-light/?test=faces#ixzz1YkqVQLjb

http://www.latimes.com/news/science/la-sci-0923-speed-of-light-20110923,0,497738.story

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/09/22/science-light-idUSL5E7KM4CW20110922


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#2 Layback Bear

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Posted 23 September 2011 - 02:24 AM

Thanks Dan; kind of neat information.

#3 killerx525

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Posted 23 September 2011 - 03:57 AM

:mellow:

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#4 Bezukhov

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Posted 23 September 2011 - 04:26 AM

From someone who was an expert on the subject:

Nothing travels faster than the speed of light with the possible exception of bad news, which obeys its own special laws.-Douglas Adams


To err is Human. To blame it on someone else is even more Human.

#5 Platypus

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Posted 23 September 2011 - 06:17 AM

I gather the problem lies not in there being nothing that goes faster than the speed of light.

I remember being aware of the concept of a faster-than-light particle (tachyon) all my adult life, and Alan Chodos postulated the neutrino as a tachyonic particle in 1985.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tachyon

I think why scientists are supposedly saying finding a tachyonic neutrino would undermine special relativity, (when special relativity actually defines how a tachyon would behave), is that special relativity says particles above the speed of light would be a "mirror image" of those below the speed of light, and neither could get "past" the speed of light going either way. A tachyon for example gets faster as its energy decreases and vice versa. So a tachyonic particle cannot get back from beyond light speed, as its energy would have to increase to infinity, like a sub-lightspeed particle approaching lightspeed. If a neutrino can be proven to behave as a tachyon, that would seem to call into question special relativity's implication that a particle can be one or the other but not both.

http://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/11320/tachyon-and-photons

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#6 jgweed

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Posted 23 September 2011 - 09:24 AM

The scientific community is being cautious about the results of the experiments until they can be confirmed. Not only do the results put into question Einstein's theory of relativity, they also challenge the basic assumption of cause proceeding effect.
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#7 snemelk

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 01:28 PM

Neutrinos aren't Faster than Light: Einstein's Theory comes to His Rescue

Recently, a convincing argument for an error came from Ronald van Elburg of the University of Groningen in the Netherlands.

The OPERA project researchers simply did not take into account the relative movement of the global positioning system (GPS) clocks up in the space and thus miscalculated the distance, according to van Elburg.



Remember those faster-than-light neutrinos? Great, now forget 'em

Now, however, a team of scientists at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands reckons it's come up with a more plausible (and disappointing) explanation of what happened: the GPS satellites used to measure the departure and arrival times of the racing neutrinos were themselves subject to Einsteinian effects, because they were in motion relative to the experiment. This relative motion wasn't properly taken into account, but it would have decreased the neutrinos' apparent journey time. The Dutch scientists calculated the error and came up with the 64 nanoseconds. Sound familiar? That's because it's almost exactly the margin by which CERN's neutrinos were supposed to have beaten light.



And from a little different point of view, worth reading:

Experimentalists Aren't Idiots: The Neutrino Saga Continues

Which brings us to the final issue, which is a sociology-of-science sort of problem, which is that for this to be the explanation would require a whole bunch of people to be idiots.


ICARUS Proves Neutrinos More Than 10 Times Faster Than Light / OR WAIT A MINUTE !
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