Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

About My Keyboard


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 pks413

pks413

  • Members
  • 5 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:10:42 AM

Posted 20 January 2006 - 08:54 PM

Hi,
Hope someone can help me ...When I got my computer it already had the keyboard and everything installed.I never received a manual with the keyboard...there are buttons on it that I have no idea what they are for? Does anyone know if there are manuals avaiable? I don't know who makes them and the only thing I could find was a model number...

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


m

#2 Salo

Salo

  • Banned
  • 108 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:10:42 AM

Posted 21 January 2006 - 01:49 AM

Well, a model number isnt much to bo by. Do you know who you bought the computer as a whole from? Dell? Emachines? HP? Theres a few different variations.

If your unsure of where you bought your computer, you can take a picture and upload it so we can take a look and tell you theyre function.

#3 dc3

dc3

    Bleeping Treehugger


  • Members
  • 30,016 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sierra Foothills of Northern Ca.
  • Local time:07:42 AM

Posted 21 January 2006 - 02:06 AM

I did a quick google and found this. http://www.mdx.ac.uk/www/study/glokey.htm

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#4 acklan

acklan

    Bleepin' cat's meow


  • Members
  • 8,529 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Baton Rouge, La.
  • Local time:09:42 AM

Posted 21 January 2006 - 02:14 AM

Have you looked on the bottom of the keyboard? Any number may lead us to figure out who makes it.
"2007 & 2008 Windows Shell/User Award"

#5 phawgg

phawgg

    Learning Daily


  • Members
  • 4,543 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Location:Washington State, USA
  • Local time:07:42 AM

Posted 21 January 2006 - 04:32 AM

Hi,
Hope someone can help me ...When I got my computer it already had the keyboard and everything installed.I never received a manual with the keyboard...there are buttons on it that I have no idea what they are for? Does anyone know if there are manuals avaiable? I don't know who makes them and the only thing I could find was a model number...


I read your question about a User Manual Needed and thought:
that might be hard to find ... because it has it's basis in 'standards of development'
for keyboards of all kinds ... and those facts might help you.


I think most keyboards are based a standard identified as "qwerty'.

Some offer slight variations ... none, except special scientific ones, vary significantly from qwerty as it
has been adapted and expanded to use with computers.

Named after the first 6 alphabetical keys found in the upper left,
it is a way to describe the arrangement of keys designed for word processing to
conform to what is thought to be universally an efficient way, using two hands, to communicate.

In use of computers, "commands" to launch or initiate actions augment standard word processing.

Upper row ESC is used to "escape" from what you're doing.
F1 through F12 are typically used in a variety of software applications for special, quick access to
things like help files, alternatives like user configuration of the particular program,
based on the codes written that are the basis of how software uses the operating system
(typically Windows)

Pressing Print Scrn/SysRq once will place the contents of whatever is on your screen
into a "sub-program" called Clipboard. You can then open any image editing program
(like Paint which is included in windowsMostTypes) and choose Paste under edit tab
and it will become a photograph file you can save.

Directly below that key and two others next to it are the "navigation keys" that help
in the same way a mouse works ... in screens like typed documents or fundamental
baseline applications that are "the foundation" of operating systems like windows.

Next to that bunch of additional keys (beyond a qwert keyboard itself) are the "num keys"
They sorta differ from the numbers above the alphabetical keys.
They can be like those F1 - F12 keys, shortcuts used differently depending on what
software application (or also called a program) you are "in".
They also function as navigation keys, arrows usually shift from one line of highlighted
text to another, from one part of a line of text to another, or from one point of a screen
in any typical program to another pre-determined point.

Highlighted text generally means it may be subjected to actions beyond simple corrections.
Highlighted text indicates (usually) that you may right click your mouse ...
doing so is accessing what is called "the context menu" ... and the purpose of the context
menu is primarily to enact alternatives.
Left click being more "direct action".

Lower board includes:
Ctrl (at the far left & the far right) used as a "combining with other keys" modifier
Alt (on both sides of the space bar) used as a "combining with other keys" modifier
"the little windows icon" key (left of the spacebar) simply brings into view the Start Menu
"the little windows icon" key (right of the spacebar) simply brings into view the Start Menu
"the icon that looks like a graph with an arrow pointing) performs exactly the same way right click
on a mouse does ... to reveal what is called the "context menu". The context menu should be thought
of as "your options list". It enhances the operation of the mouse, which offers the other click (left by default) mainly for "action".

These are some basic premises.
Exact action of any key can depend on the application involved.
In the early development of GUI OSes,
(Graphic User Interface Operating Systems)
attempts were made to simplify enactment of the commands needed to direct the actions of the
computer circuits.
The commands were typed out, typically, and became increasingly complex.
Using a mouse ... over (hover) and buttons (two switchs) together with the display seen on a monitor... made it more "user friendly".

Most all OSes, and the programs developed to use them in controlling data manipulation
(which amounts to the main reason computers excel as tools) operate just as well without a mouse control using standard keyboard "on & off switchs".

That is a fact of computers, redundancy improves the overall dependibility...
so things are designed to make it possible for multiple "routes to where you want to go".

Learning about all of this amounts to repetition and practice... with practically anything that has been
"written to utilize the standards enforced regarding construction of the hardware needed to compute
and it's software ... designed to control that hardware".

The keyboard (and the mouse, too) is simply known as a Human Interface Device.
You are correct in wanting to know about the details of using it (them). :thumbsup:

Further information can be found using Google Search entering
words like qwerty or keyboard design, maybe "how to use keyboards".

Some keyboards offer special "gaming console controls".
I'm not going there for the time being ... :flowers:
patiently patrolling, plenty of persisant pests n' problems ...




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users