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Uses for an old router?


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#1 sjvirchow

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Posted 30 August 2011 - 06:06 PM

I currently have two routers in my possession. A Cisco E2000 running Tomato firmware, and a Netgear WPN-824. I have the E2000 set to auto update my dynamic IP address and send the change to OpenDNS. I've got two computers, a printer, and a powerline adapter for my satellite receiver all connected to this router.

The problem is I want to use my old WPN-824 for something, but can't think if anything. It isn't supported by any third-party firmware. As far as I know, I can only use it as a bridge with another WPN-824, which is a drag. Could I possibly use it just as a switch, to "add" more LAN ports to my network?

Any ideas?
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#2 computerxpds

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Posted 30 August 2011 - 10:15 PM

If you wanted to you could I would think if there is a setting in the firmware to turn off the wifi signal then you could use it as a switch kind of, the reason I say kind of is because the router would assign its own set of ip's so thus it not being a true switch but rather a router.

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#3 sjvirchow

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Posted 31 August 2011 - 02:26 PM

So you're saying once I get the Wi-Fi radio turned off, turn off the DHCP server on the WPN-824, and connect it to the E2000?


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#4 Teisei

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Posted 31 August 2011 - 09:53 PM

some routers have an option in the options that is some thing like this is a sub router or some thing like that.

for mine it is under:
setup/advanced routing/operating mode:
1: gate way (the main router linked to the internet)
2: router (router connected to the gate way)

i have not personally messed around with these options so not sure if both need to have these options or just the sub or main... but hope that might help.

#5 Johnny Boy

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Posted 07 September 2011 - 01:27 PM

You wouldn't need to shut off wireless, wifi can function locally as part of a switch. It is essentially just a built-in access point for local access. You would, however; need to shut off DHCP and manually assign the old router (that you will be connecting to the E2000) an IP address that is in the DHCP range of the E2000. Usually in router config there is an option for router IP address.

Edited by Johnny Boy, 07 September 2011 - 01:27 PM.

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