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Should Norton performance alerts be larger than malware warnings?


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#1 lti

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Posted 21 August 2011 - 10:36 PM

I would like to know why the performance alerts in Norton Internet Security take up almost one-fourth of the screen while the malware warnings are printed in 8-point font and take up as little screen space as possible. These stupid performance alets always get in my way and are always popping up when there is nothing wrong with the computer. All I need to do to trigger the high memory usage warning is to open Internet Explorer. This occurs on a computer running Windows XP with 1GB of RAM.

It would make sense to make the malware warnings large so they can be easily seen instead of a tiny message in the corner that is hard to see. It seems like Norton cares more about overall performance than actually doing its job of removing malware. Currently, it acts more like a registry cleaner or a rogue optimization program with all of its useless alerts.

It seems like I am the only person that finds any problems with commonly used software.

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#2 quietman7

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Posted 23 August 2011 - 08:00 AM

Not many members here at BC use Symantec products so that's probably why no one has replied to your topic thus far. I don't use Norton either but I did look through topics at the Norton Community forum and was unable to find anything similar to your question.

There may be a way to adjust the settings (size) of the alert screen. Have you checked the Help file for Performance Alerts? The Norton Internet Security User Guides mentions there are times when you may want to turn off an option. I suppose annoyance could be considered one of those times.
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#3 lti

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Posted 23 August 2011 - 07:21 PM

I changed the tolerance setting and haven't seen this message since then. It seems strange that an antivirus program would display performance alerts and produce malware warnings that are so small and easy to ignore. My parents prefer Norton, so that is what is installed on this computer.

#4 quietman7

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Posted 24 August 2011 - 06:25 AM

Although Symantec (Norton) is as good as any other well known anti-virus program, it requires numerous services and running processes that consume system resources and often results in complaints of high CPU usage. I have read from other users that Symantec has improved the newer versions while others say differently. However, Symantec products can be difficult to remove and remnants are often left behind which require the use of a special removal tool, otherwise you may encounter problems installing a replacement anti-virus. To be fair, other vendors are also using removal tools for the same reason. Those issues plus the cost factor are the primary reason many folks look for a free alternative.
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#5 lti

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Posted 24 August 2011 - 08:47 PM

They have had those problems with Norton in the past. The only other problem they have had was that Norton Internet Security 2009 had a detection rate that was almost zero. The reviews on that version of Norton left out the actual tests. They just talked about all of its features and gave it their highest rating. I wonder if Symantec asked the reviewers to leave the detection tests out of the review.

There was also another time when no antivirus software could be installed because a registry key was damaged. The most likely cause was the registry cleaner that came with that version (Norton Systemworks 2003).

#6 quietman7

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Posted 25 August 2011 - 07:37 AM

Yes Norton can be a pain removing. I have purchased two computers with it preinstalled and the first thing I did was to remove it completely before installing my replacement AV.
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