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Recovering Windows 7 system on another smaller hard drive


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11 replies to this topic

#1 TheyCallMeMrGlass

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Posted 15 August 2011 - 06:41 AM

I have a duplicate image of my windows 7 system. I want to move my windows 7 system off from my 2TB drive on to a smaller 500GB drive instead. I used an imaging program to duplicate the drive contents onto the 500GB drive. My question now is, is it safe to switch to my 500GB as my primary drive and boot up from it without affecting my Windows 7 activation status, or do I need to de-activate it first on the 2TB drive then re-activate on the 500GB drive?

Thanks
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#2 Allan

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Posted 15 August 2011 - 06:50 AM

That should not be an issue at all.

#3 strolln

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Posted 15 August 2011 - 06:56 AM

The activation is pretty much tied to the motherboard so as long as you stick with the same motherboard you will be OK.
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#4 TheyCallMeMrGlass

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Posted 15 August 2011 - 07:04 AM

Thank you guys for your quick and re-assuring answers :)
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#5 Allan

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Posted 15 August 2011 - 07:05 AM

The activation is pretty much tied to the motherboard so as long as you stick with the same motherboard you will be OK.

That's not true, but for the purposes of this thread it doesn't really matter.

#6 TheyCallMeMrGlass

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Posted 15 August 2011 - 07:37 AM


The activation is pretty much tied to the motherboard so as long as you stick with the same motherboard you will be OK.

That's not true, but for the purposes of this thread it doesn't really matter.


Well for knowledge sake, what is the activation tied up to? I'm guessing its a MAC address, I thought it might be the Hard Drive's hence this thread but perhaps its the BIOS then?
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#7 Allan

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Posted 15 August 2011 - 07:47 AM

When you install Windows one of the files it creates contains a list of all of the hardware on the system. If you make what Microsoft considers "major hardware changes" (change 2 or 3 pieces of hardware at the same time), then Windows will request reactivation. The primary purpose of this is to prevent you from taking the hd from one system and using it in another.

#8 TheyCallMeMrGlass

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Posted 15 August 2011 - 08:24 AM

Ah that sounds very fair. Thank you for that answer.
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#9 Allan

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Posted 15 August 2011 - 08:32 AM

You're welcome

#10 strolln

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Posted 15 August 2011 - 10:19 AM

When you install Windows one of the files it creates contains a list of all of the hardware on the system. If you make what Microsoft considers "major hardware changes" (change 2 or 3 pieces of hardware at the same time), then Windows will request reactivation. The primary purpose of this is to prevent you from taking the hd from one system and using it in another.

If you change the motherboard it WILL trigger re-activation. It does not require changing 2 or 3 pieces of hardware although that would do it.
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#11 Allan

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Posted 15 August 2011 - 10:25 AM


When you install Windows one of the files it creates contains a list of all of the hardware on the system. If you make what Microsoft considers "major hardware changes" (change 2 or 3 pieces of hardware at the same time), then Windows will request reactivation. The primary purpose of this is to prevent you from taking the hd from one system and using it in another.

If you change the motherboard it WILL trigger re-activation. It does not require changing 2 or 3 pieces of hardware although that would do it.


In many (but not ALL) cases that is true - but that does not mean the OS is "tied to the motherboard". It simply means you have made a significant hardware change. PLEASE stop being so argumentative. Thank you.

#12 TheyCallMeMrGlass

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Posted 15 August 2011 - 10:39 AM


When you install Windows one of the files it creates contains a list of all of the hardware on the system. If you make what Microsoft considers "major hardware changes" (change 2 or 3 pieces of hardware at the same time), then Windows will request reactivation. The primary purpose of this is to prevent you from taking the hd from one system and using it in another.

If you change the motherboard it WILL trigger re-activation. It does not require changing 2 or 3 pieces of hardware although that would do it.


I think you're both right and the reason is I am guessing, the motherboard is a combination of several hardware devices (ie controllers, USB hub, CPU channels etc)

Thanks guys :)

Edited by TheyCallMeMrGlass, 15 August 2011 - 10:41 AM.

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