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Computer suddenly stops working(Video Card)


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#1 superfanty

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Posted 06 August 2011 - 11:22 PM

Hi. So, about 3 days ago, before I left on a small vacation, my computer was working fine as usual. After 3 days, my computer has completely stopped working. When I turned my computer on, I heard a loud fan noise, which was an unfamiliar sound, because my computer is very silent. My monitor was also not working for some reason. I opened the computer up and took a look at the video card. I noticed that the fan on the video card was running at an extremely high speed. So, I pulled it out and noticed that it was very hot. So, I tried using the video plugin on the motherboard for the time being, but it did not work. (This was also the first time I ever tried using the motherboard's video card, so I'm not sure if the motherboard problem or not). I also tried using my brother's monitor, but it did not work. So, I replaced the current video card with an older video card I had in storage. However, this video card also started running extremely fast. It had never made that sound before on my previous computer. What is wrong with my computer? The GPU was a MSI R5770 Hawk Radeon HD 5770 1GB. My motherboard brand is an ASUS M5A88-V EVO AM3+.

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#2 HiroPro

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Posted 07 August 2011 - 03:27 AM

If you receive/hear no beep codes then it's "no video" and probably as in likely 70% dead RAM, 20% dead motherboard and 10% dead CPU. In other words it's your RAM that has failed. Understand that if you have TOTAL RAM FAILURE as in not just some of the BGAs but the first few in address space that the BIOS code can't load and even do beep codes. This results in a machine that will power on but nothing happens and no video signal is sent and no BIOS can even load to run diagnostics. This is why it's called "no video" as this is what end users report. Try with different memory modules making sure they are the same type, timings and spec as you had initially. You might also have to do a BIOS reset after installing new ram if you had custom timing in BIOS etc.

Edited by HiroPro, 07 August 2011 - 03:31 AM.


#3 superfanty

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Posted 07 August 2011 - 11:47 AM

If you receive/hear no beep codes then it's "no video" and probably as in likely 70% dead RAM, 20% dead motherboard and 10% dead CPU. In other words it's your RAM that has failed. Understand that if you have TOTAL RAM FAILURE as in not just some of the BGAs but the first few in address space that the BIOS code can't load and even do beep codes. This results in a machine that will power on but nothing happens and no video signal is sent and no BIOS can even load to run diagnostics. This is why it's called "no video" as this is what end users report. Try with different memory modules making sure they are the same type, timings and spec as you had initially. You might also have to do a BIOS reset after installing new ram if you had custom timing in BIOS etc.

Hello, and thank you for your response. When I do boot-up the computer, I did not hear any beeps sounds. Also, my video card was running at and extremely high speed. When I did turn on the computer, the monitor was blinking "No Signal". So, I changed to the onboard video, but I still got "No Signal" on my monitor. My RAM is not too old, but not too new, as it is only 5 month old. My computer was very quiet, but since the video card was running at super high speed, it was extremely loud.

#4 HiroPro

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Posted 07 August 2011 - 02:41 PM

The reason the video card fan is spinning so fast is due to video card firmware/microcode. Understand that when it powers on it communicates with the motherboard BIOS. When it does this on certain video cards for that instant the video card fan cranks it's self. After it's POSTed with the motherboard the firmware/microcode in the video card then throttles down the fan. If it hangs at that moment as it's doing now with your toast memory then it will stay stuck with the fan cranked.

PS brother you're talking with a PC builder with 30+ years of experience. I built my first PC in the mid to late 80s at the age of 13... it's probably your RAM.

Edited by HiroPro, 07 August 2011 - 09:57 PM.


#5 superfanty

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Posted 07 August 2011 - 05:40 PM

The reason the video card fan is spinning so fast is due to video card firmware/microcode. Understand that when it powers on it communicates with the motherboard BIOS. When it does this on certain video cards for that instant the video card fan cranks it's self. After it's POSTed with the motherboard the firmware/microcode in the video card then throttles down the fan. If it hangs at that moment as it's doing now with your toast memory then it will stay stuck with the fan cranked.... GET IT !?!

PS brother you're talking with a PC builder with 30+ years of experience. I built my first PC in the mid to late 80s at the age of 13... it's probably your RAM.

Thank you once again for your help. Since, I believe you are an experienced PC mechanic, I shall go buy myself a new RAM. Hopefully it'll fix the problem. Thank you. I'll report back if there is any change.

#6 superfanty

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Posted 07 August 2011 - 07:19 PM

I bought a new RAM and installed it, but it still does not work.

#7 HiroPro

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Posted 07 August 2011 - 09:39 PM

Sorry to hear that. Before you give up on it being the RAM make sure you reset the BIOS by removing the coin battery and also jumping the clear CMOS header (never power on with clear CMOS header jumped as this is how people damage EEPROMS!). If it's still screwy then it could be one of three more things. CPU, motherboard component failure or corrupt/failed BIOS EEPROM. I have also seen failed harddrives cause that "no video" hang though this is very rare.

Remove all expansion cards and SATA connections reset BIOS and use one memory stick see if it POSTs. Then swap each memory module to see if it behaves the same. If it still does then I'd put my money on it being a dead BIOS EEPROM. If it's socketed you can order one with BIOS flashed into it from the motherboard manufacturer.

CPUs can also fail but this is usual due to the user not inserting CPU into socket properly, crazy amount of TIM, mounting the heatsink improperly and/or cranking the voltage to high on the processor for an overclock.

Sometimes CPU's PCB package and pin grid isn't totally flat. What happens then is as the ZIF lever crunches down on the pins some of the pins are poking up farther than the rest (were talking a mm or less here usually but I have seen homebuild attempts were buddy had the pins 2mm higher at one end of the grid and had crunched down the ZIP lever!!!) and thus the CPU package is raised unevenly.

What happens next is when you attach the heatsink it's putting many pounds of pressure down on the pin grid. If you look at a ZIF socket you will notice raised bumps between the pin holes that touch the pin grid array CPU package/PCB. This helps to support the CPU package from heatsink pressure and prevent any pressure being placed on the CPU pins. What I always do is place a finger or thumb down on the top cpu slug and press with light to moderate pressure before and as I lock the lever down. Good tips to prevent CPU failure IMHO if this is your case and it's also one of the reasons Intel moved to LGA sockets. At this point though it's probably BIOS EEPROM failure.

Some help from the Asus site.
Asus Support


I would also check the ATX PSU connector by removing it and reattaching it. This will reset it's pins etc if it's continuity. The same symptoms can also occure if the ATX_12V 4/6 pin connector isn't attached or has continuity issues where it attached to the mother board. Pull it off and reseat it as well.

It's also worth noting that a short via a stay or stray screw under the motherboard can also cause similar issues. I've seen this in the shop on more than one occasion on a home/novice build attempt. And these guys computers worked for months until he moved it and the screw fell down to short.

It could also be the PSU so if you have access to another one for testing I'd do that as well.

Edited by HiroPro, 07 August 2011 - 10:52 PM.


#8 superfanty

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Posted 07 August 2011 - 10:00 PM

Sorry to hear that. Before you give up on it being the RAM make sure you reset the BIOS by removing the coin battery and also jumping the clear CMOS header. If it's still screwy then it could be one of three more things. CPU, motherboard component failure or corrupt/failed BIOS EEPROM. I have also seen failed harddrives cause that "no video" hang though this is very rare.

Remove all expansion cards and SATA connections reset BIOS and use one memory stick see if it POSTs. Then swap each memory module to see if it behaves the same. If it still does then I'd put my money on it being a dead BIOS EEPROM. If it's socketed you can order one with BIOS flashed into it from the motherboard manufacturer.

CPUs can also fail but this is usual due to the user not mounting the heatsink properly and/or cranking the voltage to high on the processor for an overclock. Sometimes CPU's PCB package and pin grid isn't totally flat. What happens then is as the ZIF lever crunches down on the pins some of the pins are poking out farther than the rest (were talking a mm or less here) and thus the CPU package is raised. What happens next is when you attach the heatsink it's putting many pounds of pressure down on the pin grid. If you look at a ZIP socket you will notice raised bumps between the pins that touch the pin grid array package/PCB. This helps to support the CPU package from heatsink pressure. What I always do is place a finger or thumb down on the top cpu slug and press with light to moderate pressure before and as I lock the lever down. Good tips to prevent CPU failure IMHO if this is your case. At this point though it's probably BIOS EEPROM failure.

I have reset the CMOS using both methods, but the computer still doesn't not work. Should I replace the motherboard completely?

#9 HiroPro

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Posted 07 August 2011 - 10:32 PM

Well that looks like the case if it's not the CPU or PSU. Looking at that board it looks like there is an 8pin DIP package near the coin cell. I wonder if that's a BIOS EEPROM. Probably not as a lot of boards simply have the EEPROM soldered right to the board to save ten cents on a socket. Asus will simply replace that EEPROM if it's not board component failure.

With the ROHS lead free BGAs failing everywhere these days it could very well be motherboard component/IC failure as in chipset BGA separation etc. I have a hot air station that could actually reflow that for ya and I could also flash that EEPROM with my Willem programer including with it right on the PCB still soldered but you have to be living in my area.

Gigabyte uses "dual BIOS" with two EEPROMs soldered to the motherboard. If one fails it falls back on the other. SMART EHH!!! Also on the AMD platform Gigabyte seems to put more effort into midpriced AMD boards. With Asus forget it man... they will abandon a fantastic hardware AMD design if it means putting any BIOS thunkers into writing code. The only reliable AMD platform boards from Asus I've seen in the last three of so years is the top end flagship models.

You're better off if getting a newer motherboard to look to another vendor. Or jump ship from AMD like I have after a decade of AMD loyalty (I purchased a whitebox AMD Athlon motherboard back in the day when Intel was threatening Asus with BX chipset shortages. Asus didn't brand the board in any way being scared of Intel. This was 1999 and was the birth of the Athlon product line) because the unlocked Sandy Bridge pasture is just to temping at 4.6Ghz stock V on air!!! Not to mention it simply blows the doors off of anything from AMD at the $225 price point.

i5-2500K is the 21st century equivalent of the 20th century Celeron 366a!!! It really is that fast and over clocks that much. Mines at over 4Ghz stock voltage on air. It will become a legend...

Edited by HiroPro, 08 August 2011 - 03:19 PM.





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