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Just deleted a virus I got from a torrent site. What else should I do to ensure the safety of my computer?


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4 replies to this topic

#1 jiggaplease

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Posted 04 August 2011 - 09:43 AM

Last night I got a virus from a torrent site (Demonoid.me) that is usually trusted. I ran Microsoft Security Essentials and it found nothing. I ran Malware Bytes and it found the 2 infected items. They were quarantined I deleted them both. How do I get my laptop back up to speed and how do I get rid of my laptop's slow start up? Also, what should I do to restore my laptop to it's optimal health and prevent any further intrusions?

Spec: HP Pavilion Laptop, Windows Vista

Edited by hamluis, 04 August 2011 - 10:19 AM.
Moved from Vista to Am I Infected.


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#2 shreyas1995

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Posted 04 August 2011 - 09:52 AM

Welcome aboardPosted Image

i think there is more malware here than meets the eye.


:step1: Download and scan with SUPERAntiSpyware Free for Home Users
  • Double-click SUPERAntiSpyware.exe and use the default settings for installation.
  • An icon will be created on your desktop. Double-click that icon to launch the program.
  • If asked to update the program definitions, click "Yes". If not, update the definitions before scanning by selecting "Check for Updates". (If you encounter any problems while downloading the updates, manually download them from here. Double-click on the hyperlink for Download Installer and save SASDEFINITIONS.EXE to your desktop. Then double-click on SASDEFINITIONS.EXE to install the definitions.)
  • In the Main Menu, click the Preferences... button.
  • Click the Scanning Control tab.
  • Under Scanner Options make sure the following are checked (leave all others unchecked):
    • Close browsers before scanning.
    • Scan for tracking cookies.
    • Terminate memory threats before quarantining.
  • Click the "Close" button to leave the control center screen.
  • Back on the main screen, under "Scan for Harmful Software" click Scan your computer.
  • On the left, make sure you check C:\Fixed Drive.
  • On the right, under "Complete Scan", choose Perform Complete Scan.
  • Click "Next" to start the scan. Please be patient while it scans your computer.
  • After the scan is complete, a Scan Summary box will appear with potentially harmful items that were detected. Click "OK".
  • Make sure everything has a checkmark next to it and click "Next".
  • A notification will appear that "Quarantine and Removal is Complete". Click "OK" and then click the "Finish" button to return to the main menu.
  • If asked if you want to reboot, click "Yes".
  • To retrieve the removal information after reboot, launch SUPERAntispyware again.
    • Click Preferences, then click the Statistics/Logs tab.
    • Under Scanner Logs, double-click SUPERAntiSpyware Scan Log.
    • If there are several logs, click the current dated log and press View log. A text file will open in your default text editor.
    • Please copy and paste the Scan Log results in your next reply.
  • Click Close to exit the program.
If you have a problem downloading, installing or getting SAS to run, try downloading and using the SUPERAntiSpyware Portable Scanner instead. Save the randomly named file (i.e. SAS_1710895.COM) to a usb drive or CD and transfer to the infected computer. Then double-click on it to launch and scan. The file is randomly named to help keep malware from blocking the scanner.



:step2: I'd like us to scan your machine with ESET OnlineScan
  • Hold down Control and click on the following link to open ESET OnlineScan in a new window.
    ESET OnlineScan
  • Click the Posted Image button.
  • For alternate browsers only: (Microsoft Internet Explorer users can skip these steps)
    • Click on Posted Image to download the ESET Smart Installer. Save it to your desktop.
    • Double click on the Posted Image icon on your desktop.
  • Check Posted Image
  • Click the Posted Image button.
  • Accept any security warnings from your browser.
  • Under scan settings, check Posted Image and check Remove found threats
  • Click Advanced settings and select the following:
    • Scan potentially unwanted applications
    • Scan for potentially unsafe applications
    • Enable Anti-Stealth technology
  • ESET will then download updates for itself, install itself, and begin scanning your computer. Please be patient as this can take some time.
  • When the scan completes, push Posted Image
  • Push Posted Image, and save the file to your desktop using a unique name, such as ESETScan. Include the contents of this report in your next reply.
  • Push the Posted Image button.
  • Push Posted Image


NOTE: In some instances if no malware is found there will be no log produced.

Edited by shreyas1995, 04 August 2011 - 09:54 AM.


#3 quietman7

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Posted 04 August 2011 - 01:47 PM

Important Note: Using any torrent, peer-to-peer (P2P) file sharing program (i.e. Limewire, eMule, Kontiki, BitTorrent, BitComet, uTorrent, BitLord, BearShare, Azureus/Vuze) or visiting such sites is a security risk which can make your system susceptible to a smörgåsbord of malware infections, remote attacks, and exposure of personal information. File sharing networks are thoroughly infected and infested with malware according to Senior Virus Analyst, Norman ASA.

The reason for this is that file sharing relies on its members giving and gaining unfettered access to computers across the P2P network. This practice can make you vulnerable to data and identity theft, system infection and remote access exploit by attackers who can take control of your computer without your knowledge. Even if you change the risky default settings to a safer configuration, downloading files from an anonymous source increases your exposure to infection because the files you are downloading may actually contain a disguised threat. Users visiting such pages may see innocuous-looking banner ads containing code which can trigger pop-up ads and malicious Flash ads that install malware. Many malicious worms and Trojans, such as the Storm Worm, target and spread across P2P files sharing networks because of their known vulnerabilities. In some instances the infection may cause so much damage to your system that recovery is not possible and a Repair Install will NOT help!. In those cases, the only option is to wipe your drive, reformat and reinstall the OS.

Even the safest P2P file sharing programs that do not contain bundled spyware, still expose you to risks because of the very nature of the P2P file sharing process. By default, most P2P file sharing programs are configured to automatically launch at startup. They are also configured to allow other P2P users on the same network open access to a shared directory on your computer. The best way to eliminate these risks is to avoid using P2P applications and torrent web sites.
Using such programs or browsing torrent sites is almost a guaranteed way to get yourself infected!!
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#4 jitterjava

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Posted 04 August 2011 - 08:27 PM

OMG! That is what happened to me from the same website...I thought if you have a firewall that is supposed to protect you...

#5 quietman7

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Posted 04 August 2011 - 09:14 PM

A firewall controls network traffic and serves two basics purposes:
  • Prevent incoming communications that you did not request from entering your computer;
  • Monitor what programs on your computer are allowed to communicate out.
The firewall does this by enforcing an access control policy to permit or block (allow or deny) inbound and outbound traffice. Thus, the firewall acts as a central gateway for such traffic by denying illegitimate transfers and facilitatint access which is deemed legitimate. The goal of the firewall is to prevent remote computers from accessing yours and provide notification of any unrequested traffic that was blocked along with the IP address. keep in mind however, that a firewall is not a panacea to solve all of your security problems. If you will open ports through your firewall to allow access to an infected machine, then the firewall is no longer relevant.

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