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How To Change System Parttion


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8 replies to this topic

#1 adh_amit

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Posted 14 January 2006 - 10:16 AM

Hi,
Can anybody help me how to change the system partition in Win XP?
Please note that my computer is not infected with worms which change the drive letters and I do not want to restore it back.
I have C: as system drive and D: as boot drive.I want to make D: as both system and boot drive so that I can then go on and repartition C:.
Currently windows does not allow any format or repartition of c: because it is a system drive.

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#2 franktiii

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Posted 14 January 2006 - 01:50 PM

We probably need some more information to answer your question. When you say that your c drive is the system drive do you mean that windows is installed there? If so how do you boot from the d drive? Is windows installed on both drives?

There are 3rd party programs that can create, resize and otherwise change your partitions, such as Partition Magic, this might allow you to do what you are asking about.

The other option would be to backup files and drivers, reinstall windows, reformat drive and setup partitions.

In setting up your partitions, there are 3 basic scenarios (leaving aside where your cd/drive(s) might be)

c drive Windows and programs and d drive files

or c drive, Windows only, d drive programs and e drive files

You may also create additional partitions for different types of files, pictures mp3 etc.

But optimally, I would recommend the c drive having windows and programs and d drive having files. That makes it a little easier t0 do a regular backup and if your system gets hosed you can more easily get up and running.

#3 adh_amit

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Posted 15 January 2006 - 05:10 AM

ok,let me expain it better.
I have c,d and e parttions on my hard disk.C: has 10 gb of space.I have

often seen that whenever a worm or something comes up, I need to format

c: and lose any data if I store it there.So I wanted to repartition c

as c1 and c2 so that i can use c1 to host OS only(which can be

formatted if needed)and c2 to suffice my additional data requirement.

To do this,I uninstalled windows on c and installed it on d.But now

windows disk management tells me that c is system drive and d is boot

drive.And format or repartition of c is not being allowed even from

recovery console.

C is not having windows but it is carrying files such as

boot,ntdetect,bootbak,cofig,msdos etc.

I know mere deleting of these files or moving to d: will be

dangerous.So I want to know a good way to change the system drive.

Thanks for your concern.

#4 franktiii

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Posted 15 January 2006 - 02:40 PM

I would still recommend backing up files if possible and reinstalling windows. You can partition hard drive with c, d, and e drives (again leaving out your cd/dvd drives) and set things up as you describe.

Moving windows os files is liable to create more problems than it solves.

#5 adh_amit

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Posted 16 January 2006 - 10:04 AM

ok,i got your point.
Can you tell me how this backup can be done?
I have around 27 GB data and don't have another HDD.Can I back up to CDs?
Also I saw many posts recommending Digital dolly for backups, but that 42 MB of download is too much for my dial up speed.
Any less heavy alternative available?

Forgive me for all my ignorance

#6 usasma

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Posted 16 January 2006 - 10:32 AM

You can use the Backup function in XP to do this (but I don't have any experience with it).

Since you've got 27 gB of data and no backup - let me tell you a story about my problems. I was replacing my primary hard drive (had just got a new Raptor SATA drive). Didn't need to backup my secondary drive with 3 years worth of data (an 80 gB drive that was nearly full).

So, I installed the new drive, booted up, and the secondary drive was gone! 3 years worth of work had vanished. I tried all the recovery options and nothing worked. I could spend $600 to $1800 to pay a recovery service to recover it - if I was wealthy! So, now it's a paperweight on my desk!

Oh, and another story: I was repartitioning my new secondary drive in preparation for putting my swap file on it (I'd replaced the old secondary drive with another Raptor). The program froze in the middle of repartitioning the drive.

Once again, everything was lost! I was able to use a free recovery utility to recover the info - but it was too darned confusing for me to work it effectively. So, I spent the money on GetDataBack in order to recover it ($80 for the NTFS recover tool; $120 for the NTFS and FAT32 bundle).

The point of all this being that a few bucks for another drive or a utility to do this for you will beat the cost of recovering it once you've lost it (and there's no assurance that you'll even be able to recover it)!

It's your data - and your choice!
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#7 franktiii

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Posted 16 January 2006 - 10:43 AM

No, it's an important question. and something to think about for everyone because hard drives can, er do, die.

27 gigabytes equals aprox. 27000 megabytes. A cd-rom holds aprox. 650 megabytes. So we are talking around 42 cd-roms without compression. That is not impossible, but will take some time.

One option would be to buy a dvd burner. You can buy a nice internal dvd burner for $60-$100 dollars. External drives are a little more. They generally come with a limited edition of Nero or Roxio software for dvd authoring and backup.

With a dvd burner, a standard dvd holds 4.7 gigabytes aprox or 6 dvds for your backup, again without any compression.

Dual layer dvds hold 8.5 gigabytes aprox or 4 disks, though dual layer disks are about 4 to 5 times more expensive than standard dvds.

The other option is an external hard drive, which are available in sizes from 40 to 300 gigabytes and generally include software for doing backups. These are a little more expensive, but the advantage is you start the process and let it run overnight and in the morning it is done.

#8 adh_amit

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 11:55 PM

hey, thanks for our replies again...
And good to know I am not the only victim of PCs :thumbsup:
I think I am on to buy a DVD RW next month...

#9 Enthusiast

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Posted 18 January 2006 - 12:14 AM

For backing up as much data as you have and to keep backups current you would be better off buying an external hard drive rather than trying to do it with cds or dvds.

For example, from Circuit City:

Seagate External Hard Drive (ST3160026A-RK)
SGE ST3160026ARK
• 160GB capacity, 7200RPM
• USB 2.0 connection
• 8MB data buffer

• Hot-swappable
• Stackable
• For Mac® and PC
Price was:
$179.99
You save:
-$10.00
You pay:
$169.99
Mail-in rebate(s):
-$80.00

Price after
rebate:
$89.99

Most of these come with software which automates backups.




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