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What can a Radeon HD 6670 play?


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#1 dtewi

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 03:04 PM

I don't want a video card that will last 10 years and can play Crysis 2 on max, but I would like something that can play the occasional game or two, like Portal 2.

It's just a 1GB Radeon HD 6670.

Other specs to the PC are:

AMD Phenom II X6 1065T @ 2.9GHz

6GB DDR3-1333MHz SDRAM

So what should this PC be able to play?

And do you guys think I should shell out an extra $130 to replace that with a 6850, or just wait until it becomes cheaper?

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#2 Ryan 3000

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 03:08 PM

It benchmarks slightly better than a 9800GTX+, which a couple years ago was the premier video card. The answer: it will play any game except for Crysis 2 on max. I have a 9800GTX+ and I can play Crysis on Very High with my resolution turned down, and I play Company of Heroes on ultra-max and it never stutters unless there are 10 simultaneous artillery strikes at once, which is incredibly rare.

It's good enough that you rarely worry about how well it will perform.

I'm sorry, I keep editing this sucker, but I think you'll find this useful as well. Once you have a video card, and you've played on it, and know how well it performs, you can easily compare it to a new card by comparing their benchmarks. Benchmarks are basically scores based on performance, and one of the most common is the 3DMark06 benchmark. My 9800GTX+ scores around 11,000 points on 3DMark06, and your card is looking at about 12,000 points, which means you can probably expect almost 10% better framerates than my video card. The 3DMark06 standard is now being phased out by 3DMark11, but for now, almost every card has a 3DMark06 score for easy comparison.

Edited by Ryan 3000, 23 July 2011 - 03:23 PM.

No pessimist ever discovered the secrets of the stars, or sailed to an uncharted land.

#3 dtewi

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 03:22 PM

It benchmarks slightly better than a 9800GTX+, which a couple years ago was the premier video card. The answer: it will play any game except for Crysis 2 on max. I have a 9800GTX+ and I can play Crysis on Very High with my resolution turned down, and I play Company of Heroes on ultra-max and it never stutters unless there are 10 simultaneous artillery strikes at once, which is incredibly rare.

It's good enough that you rarely worry about how well it will perform.


Seems like I found a new PC.

OK thank you. :)

Edit: Thanks again :P

Edited by dtewi, 23 July 2011 - 03:24 PM.


#4 dtewi

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 03:36 PM

Oh, would you happen to know what the power demands might be for the CPU and GPU?

#5 Ryan 3000

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 03:47 PM

Oh, would you happen to know what the power demands might be for the CPU and GPU?

A 500-watt power supply is pretty standard nowadays and ought to serve you fine. You can do a lot of math to add up these things but at the end of the day, few computers go over 500w and you'll find that 500w power supplies are among the most common.
No pessimist ever discovered the secrets of the stars, or sailed to an uncharted land.

#6 dtewi

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 03:57 PM


Oh, would you happen to know what the power demands might be for the CPU and GPU?

A 500-watt power supply is pretty standard nowadays and ought to serve you fine. You can do a lot of math to add up these things but at the end of the day, few computers go over 500w and you'll find that 500w power supplies are among the most common.


HP isn't listing the power supply. Is it safe to just assume?

#7 Ryan 3000

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 04:01 PM

HP isn't listing the power supply. Is it safe to just assume?

If you're ordering a pre-assembled computer from HP, it darn-well better come with the proper power supply :P
So if it's a computer you're customizing on their website, yes.
If you're building it yourself, um, ... get the specs.
No pessimist ever discovered the secrets of the stars, or sailed to an uncharted land.

#8 dtewi

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 04:07 PM

If you're ordering a pre-assembled computer from HP, it darn-well better come with the proper power supply :P
So if it's a computer you're customizing on their website, yes.
If you're building it yourself, um, ... get the specs.


Yeah, it's a customized HP

Some of my chat buddies on another site say HP isn't the greatest though. They say it has too much bloatware and isn't too reliable. Any feedback on that?

Sorry for the off-topic stuff BTW.

Edited by dtewi, 23 July 2011 - 04:09 PM.


#9 Ryan 3000

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 04:16 PM

Hey, whatever's related to solving your problem, I would consider on-topic.

HP is a mainstream brand and as such, their quality control is pretty good but they slip up every now and then. A 1-year replacement warranty is a good investment because if there are any problems with connections, hardware, or the overall design of the computer, they'll become evident pretty quickly. That's all I can say. Some people will have hardware problems and others won't.
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#10 dtewi

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 04:24 PM

Hey, whatever's related to solving your problem, I would consider on-topic.

HP is a mainstream brand and as such, their quality control is pretty good but they slip up every now and then. A 1-year replacement warranty is a good investment because if there are any problems with connections, hardware, or the overall design of the computer, they'll become evident pretty quickly. That's all I can say. Some people will have hardware problems and others won't.


Good thing it comes with a 2-year warranty then.

Thanks for your help. :)




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