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My bleeping video card....


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#1 SgtNoobert

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Posted 18 July 2011 - 03:05 PM

So I'm almost positive my PCI-E slot is broken but it may be bad RAM...just need help confirming. My computer was working 2 days ago perfectly fine then...beep errors. I have already unhooked everything and booted up, just one stick of RAM in and CPU, I get one long beep and three short beeps. My setup is as follows: Rosewill 550W PSU, ASUS a8n SLI premium mobo, Opteron 165 proc, 4gigs of corsair XMS3200 (2 diff types, 4 sticks), and a 550GTX video card. I just recently got this new video card b/c i thought my old one was fried b/c of the beep code error but surprise surprise, still one beep and 3 short ones. All fans light up and spin, I hear harddrives going and everything else so I don't believe its my PSU (its fairly new).

Could anyone please offer me some advice??? because I am lost...no clue what to do next....

Thanks in advance!

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#2 computerxpds

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Posted 18 July 2011 - 03:18 PM

Did you make sure to put the one stick of ram in the first slot? Also try the other stick just in case. Be sure the GPU is seated properly and is plugged into AUX power from the PSU (If Applies). :)

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#3 SgtNoobert

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Posted 18 July 2011 - 03:33 PM

6 pin connecter is attached, tried other one on PSU as well in case it was dead...still same problem, one stick of RAM and vid card in...still same beep code, one long....3 short

#4 SgtNoobert

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Posted 18 July 2011 - 03:45 PM

put in black stick of XMS (versus silver) got one long beep 2 short....put silver stick back in DIMM 1 and then one long beep...3 short

#5 abauw

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Posted 18 July 2011 - 05:55 PM

do you another VGA to test?
if yes please remove your VGA and replace with another VGA and see what happen.

and could you tell what brand and type of your VGA?

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#6 SgtNoobert

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 09:25 PM

Put my old 7900GT in and same beep code...one long 3 short

#7 MrBruce1959

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 01:36 AM

1 Long and 3 Short beeps are an indication of a GPU error.

Here is what I suggest you try, boot the system up and press the keyboard key mentioned on screen for SETUP, this is most likely the DEL or DELETE key.

Once you are in your BIOS screen, look for any mention in the BIOS menus for loading fail safe defaults or system defaults, there should be a keyboard shortcut key mentioned here, choose that option and save the changes.

This should cause the BIOS setup utility to load the hardware configuration settings that works the best for a successful boot up.

If this attempt fails, try moving the video card to the other slot, this board has two slots for video cards because it has SLI technology, perhaps the system will now boot if the card is in the other slot.
Please let me know if this trick worked or not, I am not out of ideas at this point, but I do not want to put too much on the plate in one post.

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#8 SgtNoobert

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 11:18 AM

There is no video on POST attempt, just the beep code, monitor screen remains black. Also, swapping PCI-e slots isn't an option, my vid card is huge and the case is in the way on the lower slot.

Edited by SgtNoobert, 20 July 2011 - 11:19 AM.


#9 MrBruce1959

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 01:25 PM

What I am trying to have you check is if your PCI-E slot is bad or if your motherboard is shorting out to the computer case where it is not supposed to be shorted out.
I suggest for the purpose of this test that you attempt to rebuild your computer system outside of the computer case.

This means gutting the computer tower so everything is hooked up minus the computer tower.
You can leave the PSU in the tower if the cables are long enough to reach the motherboard.

Make sure you ground your self first to discharge any static electricity your body may have stored up, before touching anything inside the computer case, touching a cold water pipe that is grounded to Earth ground should be good enough to discharge static electricity. Try to avoid working in a carpeted floor area, because this increases the risk of static electricity build up.

The motherboard should be placed on a table top where it does not have any contact with any METAL objects that might short out the motherboard.

The video card won't be totally secure without the mounting bracket in the computer case slot so be careful that it is secure in the first slot securely.

In case you are asking what is the point of this procedure, it is being suggested to see if your motherboard was somehow shorting out to the computer case somewhere where it shouldn't be.

All your hardware will work just fine minus the computer case. :wink:

Connect everything just as it was inside the computer case, if any hardware besides the motherboard can be connected to the motherboard without removing it from the case, feel free to leave it in the case and connect the data cables and power harnesses for the hard drive and optical drives.

You might have a slight problem with the motherboard to case wires that go to the power switch, HDD LED and power LED, if this is the case, carefully try removing the towers front panel circuit board which these wires run to, so they can reach the motherboard.

Try booting up the system up once you have everything connected up correctly and have rechecked everything to be sure everything is correctly connected where it should be.

Please let me know if the computer boots up like it is supposed to.

If it does, you now know your motherboard was shorted out to the computer case where it was not supposed to be.

If this fails, I am not out of ideas yet, so please hang in there.

Bruce.

Edited by MrBruce1959, 20 July 2011 - 01:38 PM.

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#10 SgtNoobert

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 03:10 PM

I haven't had an opportunity to break my computer all the way down yet but wanted to ask a question before I started. My computer was running perfectly fine just a couple days ago and when I shut down one evening, it just wouldn't reboot. I didn't drop the computer or shift anything in any way so how could it be shorting out all of a sudden? Will make computer breadboxed shortly....thanks for all your help so far!!

#11 MrBruce1959

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 03:39 PM

You're most welcomed, that's what we are here for. :thumbup2:

As for the reasons for doing this procedure, it helps eliminate possibilities by using a process of elimination.

Seriously though, doing this may cause a disruption of oxidation on electrical connections, this can happen without warning or reason.

Computers are basically an array of hardware that is interconnected through physical mechanical connections. In other words, the electrical connections are simply one metal alloy being forced against another metal alloy to create a physical connection.

Because of atmospheric conditions such as moisture (h2o) in the air we breath and corrosive compounds in the air from pollution, metals can oxidize and corrode and develop what is called a white power effect on the connections, this can cause resistance in the associated connectors and the eventual failure of the circuit in question.

To eliminate oxidation is to simply disconnect any problematic connectors and reconnect them, this will disturb the layer that is causing the circuit to fail.

Mind you, you may not notice anything unusual under close observation with the connectors, but just doing the un-connect and re-connect process can often resolve many hidden issues with ZIF connectors found in all electronic devices.

So go ahead and do what you mentioned above and please keep us posted on the results.

Bruce.
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