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Avast scan detected Java:Agent


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#1 HeeHaw5130

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Posted 04 July 2011 - 08:01 AM

Hello. I recently did a manual full scan using Avast 6 and it picked up two infected files, one named "Java:Agent-LB [Expl]" and "Java:Agent-LC [Expl]" (note the LB and LC). I've since quarantined them to the virus chest so I can try and figure out what kind of payload this infection does and see what else it may have done since, but I just haven't been able to find out anything other than it's some sort of trojan or exploit. The information out there is too general or vague as to what it does.

I'm not sure if my system is completely clean or not, as the simple action of removing infected files just isn't enough anymore these days. Avast did not detect anything else after another full scan and neither did ESET's online scanner. Spybot S&D didn't pick up anything either even with the latest updates and the Java cache has been flushed since. No pop-ups, redirects, blue-screens, restarts, absolutely nothing even remotely unusual has happened so far (making me a little more nervous as usual), but I just want to make sure nothing was overlooked.

Thanks.

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#2 boopme

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Posted 04 July 2011 - 08:47 AM

Hello, it appears you have stooped the infection.. An Exploit is a program or technique that takes advantage of a vulnerability to remotely access or attack a program, computer or server.

What version of JAVA,if any, is running? XP
Go into Control Panel>Add Remove Programs. Be sure the 'Show Updates' box is checked. Go down the list and tell me what Java applications are installed and their version. (Highlight the program to see this).


VISTA
What version of JAVA is running?
Go into Control Panel> Programs > Uninstall a Program.
Go down the list and tell me what Java applications are installed and their version.
Same with Adobe.
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#3 HeeHaw5130

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Posted 04 July 2011 - 10:40 AM

Ah, I forgot to mention I'm running Win XP. My current version of Sun Java is version 6, update 24. I've simply forgotten to update it, probably one of the ways the infection got to my computer in the first place.

Anything else?

#4 boopme

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Posted 04 July 2011 - 08:20 PM

Important Note: Your version of Java is out of date. Older versions have vulnerabilities that malicious sites can use to exploit and infect your system.Please follow these steps to remove older version Java components and update:
  • Download the latest version of Java Runtime Environment (JRE) Version 6 and save it to your desktop.
  • Look for "Java Platform, Standard Edition".
  • Click the "Download JRE" button to the right.
  • Read the License Agreement, and then check the box that says: "Accept License Agreement".
  • From the list, select your OS and Platform (32-bit or 64-bit).
  • If a download for an Offline Installation is available, it is recommended to choose that and save the file to your desktop.
  • Close any programs you may have running - especially your web browser.
Go to Posted Image > Control Panel, double-click on Add/Remove Programs or Programs and Features in Vista/Windows 7 and remove all older versions of Java.
  • Check (highlight) any item with Java Runtime Environment (JRE or J2SE) in the name.
  • Click the Remove or Change/Remove button and follow the onscreen instructions for the Java uninstaller.
  • Repeat as many times as necessary to remove each Java versions.
  • Reboot your computer once all Java components are removed.
  • Then from your desktop double-click on jre-6u26-windows-i586.exe to install the newest version.
  • If using Windows 7 or Vista and the installer refuses to launch due to insufficient user permissions, then Run As Administrator.
  • When the Java Setup - Welcome window opens, click the Install > button.
  • If offered to install a Toolbar, just uncheck the box before continuing unless you want it.
  • The McAfee Security Scan Plus tool is installed by default unless you uncheck the McAfee installation box when updating Java.
-- Starting with Java 6u10, the uninstaller incorporated in each new release uses Enhanced Auto update to automatically remove the previous version when updating to a later update release. It will not remove older versions, so they will need to be removed manually.
-- Java is updated frequently. If you want to be automatically notified of future updates, just turn on the Java Automatic Update feature and you will not have to remember to update when Java releases a new version.


Note: The Java Quick Starter (JQS.exe) adds a service to improve the initial startup time of Java applets and applications but it's not necessary.
To disable the JQS service if you don't want to use it:
  • Go to Start > Control Panel > Java > Advanced > Miscellaneous and uncheck the box for Java Quick Starter.
  • Click Ok and reboot your computer.

How do I get help? Who is helping me?For the time will come when men will not put up with sound doctrine. Instead, to suit their own desires, they will gather around them a great number of teachers to say what their itching ears want to hear....Become a BleepingComputer fan: Facebook

#5 HeeHaw5130

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Posted 07 July 2011 - 04:22 AM

Java has been updated.

#6 boopme

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Posted 07 July 2011 - 01:45 PM

run Avast again as we look good now.
How do I get help? Who is helping me?For the time will come when men will not put up with sound doctrine. Instead, to suit their own desires, they will gather around them a great number of teachers to say what their itching ears want to hear....Become a BleepingComputer fan: Facebook

#7 HeeHaw5130

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Posted 07 July 2011 - 05:39 PM

Nothing came up. Looks all clear.

#8 boopme

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Posted 07 July 2011 - 07:29 PM

It does to me.
If there are no more problems or signs of infection, you should Create a New Restore Point to prevent possible reinfection from an old one. Some of the malware you picked up could have been saved in System Restore. Since this is a protected directory your tools cannot access to delete these files, they sometimes can reinfect your system if you accidentally use an old restore point. Setting a new restore point AFTER cleaning your system will help prevent this and enable your computer to "roll-back" to a clean working state.

The easiest and safest way to do this is:
  • Go to Start > Programs > Accessories > System Tools and click "System Restore".
  • Choose the radio button marked "Create a Restore Point" on the first screen then click "Next". Give the R.P. a name, then click "Create". The new point will be stamped with the current date and time. Keep a log of this so you can find it easily should you need to use System Restore.
  • Then use Disk Cleanup to remove all but the most recently created Restore Point.
  • Go to Start > Run and type: Cleanmgr
  • Click "Ok". Disk Cleanup will scan your files for several minutes, then open.
  • Click the "More Options" tab, then click the "Clean up" button under System Restore.
  • Click Ok. You will be prompted with "Are you sure you want to delete all but the most recent restore point?"
  • Click Yes, then click Ok.
  • Click Yes again when prompted with "Are you sure you want to perform these actions?"
  • Disk Cleanup will remove the files and close automatically.
Vista Users can refer to these links: Create a New Restore Point and Disk Cleanup.

Tips to protect yourself against malware and reduce the potential for re-infection:Avoid gaming sites, pirated software, cracking tools, keygens, and peer-to-peer (P2P) file sharing programs. They are a security risk which can make your computer susceptible to a smörgåsbord of malware infections, remote attacks, exposure of personal information, and identity theft. Many malicious worms and Trojans spread across P2P file sharing networks, gaming and underground sites. Users visiting such pages may see innocuous-looking banner ads containing code which can trigger pop-up ads and malicious Flash ads that install viruses, Trojans and spyware. Ads are a target for hackers because they offer a stealthy way to distribute malware to a wide range of Internet users. The best way to reduce the risk of infection is to avoid these types of web sites and not use any P2P applications. Read P2P Software User Advisories and Risks of File-Sharing Technology.

Keeping Autorun enabled on USB and other removable drives has become a significant security risk due to the increasing number of malware variants that can infect them and transfer the infection to your computer. To learn more about this risk, please read:
How do I get help? Who is helping me?For the time will come when men will not put up with sound doctrine. Instead, to suit their own desires, they will gather around them a great number of teachers to say what their itching ears want to hear....Become a BleepingComputer fan: Facebook




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