Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Speakers crackling after installing new video card


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 emilysschw

emilysschw

  • Members
  • 28 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:20 AM

Posted 21 June 2011 - 02:45 AM

Hello, and thank you very much ahead of time for your help.

I am running a Dell XPS 400 machine, 5 years old, on Windows XP with SP3. I originally had an nVidia GeForce 7900 GS, but it went kaput a couple weeks ago (monitor would show crazy lines during bootup and then shut off) so I went to the store to get a new one. I went with an EVGA nVidia GeForce GT430 (1024MB DDR3) mainly because the required wattage, 300W, was within the capacity of my Dell's 375W power supply.

I installed the card in the same PCI Express slot as my previous card, which, by the way, had a direct line of power to the power supply via a 6-pin molex connector, whereas the new card does not (so I let the connector dangle inside the computer case). I booted up the computer and installed the drivers from the EVGA disc. The monitor seemed to work fine.

The problem occurred when I went to watch a video. Then I noticed that the audio of the video is mixed with crackling sounds coming from the speakers. The crackling gets worse when the image is larger, i.e., when I open to full-screen view. The issue has occurred when I'm watching Youtube, Netflix, Hulu. I can really get the crackling going when there's a video playing on a webpage and I scroll the webpage up and down real fast.

My sound card is a Creative Soundblaster x-Fi Platinum, model SB0460, also original with the computer. It is three slots away from the video card with no other cards between, so a total of about four centimeters of air apart.

Not sure it's relevant, but figured I'd mention: I first noticed the problem when I went to watch something in Netflix on a new browser (I've recently started using Chrome) and was prompted to install Silverlight into the browser. Then I opened Netflix and that's when I first noticed the problem. This was a couple days after installing the card, but I'm pretty sure it was the first time I watched video with the new card, so it stands to reason that it would have been the moment I noticed the problem. I only mention it in the off chance that Silverlight has anything to do with it.

Would be grateful for any insight into this issue. Steps I've taken so far, with no change:

1) Manually removed and re-installed both the video card and the Soundblaster card, in the same slots.

2) Downloaded and installed a new package of drivers for the Soundblaster X-Fi from the Creative website.

Thanks very much for your help.

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 MrBruce1959

MrBruce1959

    My cat Oreo


  • BC Advisor
  • 6,377 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Norwich, Connecticut. in the USA
  • Local time:12:20 PM

Posted 21 June 2011 - 08:30 AM

I know that Silverlight is just a browser enhancer for web sites that use HTML code that work well with the browser add-on, but I do not believe your issue is related to silverlight.

It is more like a grounding issue than anything else I can suspect as being your problem.

For one, your original card had an extra ground connection via that 4 pin power connection.

For another, you may have moved your audio cable for your CD/DVD drive closer to the video in the process of changing out one video card for the other.

Check the location of that wire and see it is relatively close to the video card. If it is try routing it away from it.

There is a possibility your video card is creating stray radiation, I am not referring to radio active radiation, I am referring to stray radio waves that can be picked up by the amplifiers in the audio circuits of your sound card.

Try adding a tin foil shield between the cards, making sure it does not short out to anything, and see if the interference goes away or is minimized somewhat.

If that shield helps, try to make it permanent and make absolutely sure it does not come loose and cause a motherboard short.

Please keep me posted and let me know if any suggestions I have made so far have helped.

Bruce.
Welcome to Bleeping Computer! :welcome:
New Members: Please click here for the Bleeping Computer Forum Board Rules
 
My Career Involves 37 Years as an Electronics Repair Technician, to Which I am Currently Retired From.

I Am Currently Using Windows 10 Home Edition.

As a Volunteer Staff Member of Bleeping Computer, the Help That I Proudly Provide Here To Our BC Forum Board Membership is Free of Charge. :wink:

#3 emilysschw

emilysschw
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 28 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:20 AM

Posted 24 June 2011 - 03:05 AM

Hi Bruce, thank you for your reply. I went back in the case and looked around for any relocated wires but couldn't find any; the wiring seems to be pretty much the same as it was in the previous arrangement, and the 6-pin connecting power cable that used to go to the video card is now stowed far from the card slots. That's the only wire I can think of that's in a different position.

I'm hesitant to try the aluminum foil solution, as appropriate as it sounds, because I don't want to create a worse problem by shorting something. And I know that however I rig the piece of foil, I would be constantly concerned of it falling off in there and short-circuiting something, so I don't think I'm ready to go that way as a permanent solution.

For what it's worth, I bought a second card, a PNY Verto GeForce 210, and tried installing it (first uninstalling the other), and was able to re-create the problem. This card also did not need the 6-pin connector from the power supply, so it didn't help to diagnose whether part of the problem is that lack-of-grounding issue you mentioned. I also heard some weird sizzling sounds coming from inside my computer while the new card was running, so I bailed on the new card and re-installed the EVGA.

Do you think it would be worthwhile to purchase a video card that uses the 6-pin connector and try that? To see if that makes the difference?

I'm surprised more people don't have this problem, since it's a 5-year-old Dell and I'm sure many people have had to replace their graphics card after this much time, with the same internal setup that I have. If you have any more suggestions as to an action plan -- whether that's talking to Dell, or one of the card companies, or a different technical idea -- I'm all ears.

Thank you!

#4 ReviverSoft

ReviverSoft

    Happy to help!


  • Members
  • 1,552 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Somewhere on this planet...
  • Local time:09:20 AM

Posted 24 June 2011 - 06:27 AM

Hi there,

I think you need to try running your system without the Creative Soundblaster card installed, merely on the motherboard's onboard audio chipset.

So remove the sound card, leave the new EVGA video card installed, enable the onboard audio through the BIOS, reboot and start up.

Please check to see if you still hear the crackling noise.


Secondly, since you mentioned the problem persists with the cards that don't require an external power connector, it might be worthwhile to get an equivalent card that requires the same.

The way I see it, both your video card and sound card are currently being powered through your motherboard, which due to insufficient amperage or other factors, is supposedly causing the crackling noise. However, as per your previous setup, if the new card was to be powered directly by the PSU, we would be able to confirm that the above assumption is true.

Hope this helps.
ReviverSoft - Happy to help!

#5 emilysschw

emilysschw
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 28 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:20 AM

Posted 24 June 2011 - 05:41 PM

Cool, let me give that a try! One thing: when you say enable onboard audio through BIOS, could you give me quick instructions?

#6 MrBruce1959

MrBruce1959

    My cat Oreo


  • BC Advisor
  • 6,377 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Norwich, Connecticut. in the USA
  • Local time:12:20 PM

Posted 24 June 2011 - 09:07 PM

Try adding a tin foil shield between the cards, making sure it does not short out to anything, and see if the interference goes away or is minimized somewhat.
Bruce.



I'm hesitant to try the aluminum foil solution,


The purpose of the tin foil shield was to see if the interference was minimized while it was placed in between the two expansion cards.
It was not meant to be a permanent solution.

I should have been a little bit clearer on that. :wink:


Bruce.
Welcome to Bleeping Computer! :welcome:
New Members: Please click here for the Bleeping Computer Forum Board Rules
 
My Career Involves 37 Years as an Electronics Repair Technician, to Which I am Currently Retired From.

I Am Currently Using Windows 10 Home Edition.

As a Volunteer Staff Member of Bleeping Computer, the Help That I Proudly Provide Here To Our BC Forum Board Membership is Free of Charge. :wink:

#7 emilysschw

emilysschw
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 28 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:20 AM

Posted 28 June 2011 - 02:19 AM

Hello, a quick update:

I went out and shopped for a graphics card that would use the same type of 6-pin connector that my old card used. I picked the EVGA GTS450 (mainly for price). I uninstalled the GT 430 (which used no 6-pin cable) and installed the GTS450. The problem went away. So it appears that the problem did have to do with both the video and sound card sucking power directly from the motherboard, whether that was because of insufficient power capacity from the motherboard or some sort of lack-of-grounding problem on the video card.

In any case, I'm psyched that the problem went away. I can now watch video on hulu, netflix, youtube, etc. without any crackle.

Of course, solve one problem, end up with a slightly different one. :-) When shopping for the card with the 6-pin connection, I discovered a complicating factor: it appears that manufacturers no longer make cards with a below-375W wattage rating (my machine's maximum) that require the 6-pin cable. It seems nowadays the cardmakers assume that a 300w or 350w card should be runnable on a motherboard alone. So the card I got is 400w, which I realize on my 375w system is somewhat of a risk.

- To what extent should I be worried about using a 400w card on a system with a 375w power supply? I've heard rumors around the web that these Dell XPS power supplies are under-rated and can handle slightly more than 400w but I don't know whether to believe that. For what it's worth, I don't use this computer for gaming or editing movies.

- Should I upgrade the power supply to something like 400w or 500w? And if so, I'm just wondering if that means I'll have to upgrade other things as well. I'm a little wary about the chain reaction of all this -- I thought this was gonna be a simple video card switch and now I'm looking at getting a new power supply. Will getting a new power supply potentially require me to get a new something else, or is the power supply more of an independent, stand-alone upgrade that doesn't affect anything else?

Appreciate any help -- thank you kindly.

#8 emilysschw

emilysschw
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 28 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:20 AM

Posted 11 July 2011 - 12:12 AM

Hi, it's been a couple weeks, but I would still really appreciate a reply to my most recent questions. Thanks for your attention!




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users