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Unknown computers in my network place


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#1 pcrepairs

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Posted 15 June 2011 - 03:22 PM

I have never seen this before. On a clients computer connected to the internet with dsl she has other computers show up in her "my network places".These computers are on the telephone companies dsl but not hook to her. I check another persons computer and they had other people from around the area show up in thier "my network places".They all use static ips.have the same telephone dsl service. Is this normal for computers to show up in each others home network? I may just live in the dark ages and never paid attention but i never seen this before.Thanks for any info.

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#2 Orecomm

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 08:26 PM

No, that is not "normal". It sounds like your ISP's modems are set to bridge mode and you are not using a home router. This means your computer is getting a public (or at least public within the ISP) network address and is fully exposed to the Internet as well as your neighbors. Not a good idea. Get and use a cheap home router, or at least turn off file and print sharing and any other network service you can reach except Internet Protocol V4, set your network connection profile to "Public", and make sure your firewall is on (I'd reset it to defaults initially). Run a full battery of antivirus checks - if it's been exposed very long in that mode chances are it isn't your computer any more. You can also change your workgroup to something unique to at least hide things, but turning off file and print sharing is better.

#3 pcrepairs

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Posted 19 June 2011 - 04:59 PM

Thanks for the info.My biggest concern is that most customers that use this service have no idea that they are probably showing any shared files to everyone.I assumed until now that this dsl service that their modems were using some type of nat. Not giving it a second thought,but then I started to think they all use static ips,they are all on the same network.I don't know if they go to a server with a different ip to get to the net. But the ip addresses do not look as if they are internal. Evenso I wouldn't want a neighbor checking out my files. To me they are externel ips.I talked with the telephone companies tech and he acted like this was normal and there wasn't any problem. To me I thought it was irresponsible of them for not using routers to connect the customers to the net.I work as an independant tech,so I really have no say.I will start warning everyone I service in that area.

#4 Orecomm

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Posted 19 June 2011 - 05:50 PM

Your biggest concern appears well founded. It's certainly not best practice for an ISP to directly bridge clients together, although it often happened that way in the early days of Cable Modems. DSL has usually been 'smarter' than that. Your DSL provider may have an option in the DSLAM for subscriber isolation, which at least prevents them from directly contacting one another, but it sounds like they are not even using that. From the ISP's point of view bridging clients can be a disaster too. Just plug the DSL modem ethernet into one of the shared LAN ports on a home router and let it hand out DHCP addresses to all of their clients for a few hours and I bet you get their attention. I work with a couple of ISP's and we have a hard rule, either you have a router (which we will give a public IP to if needed) or we configure our unit as a NAT router for your (and our) protection. Under no circumstances may a client PC connect directly to the net. Certain addresses (RFC1918, loopbacks, directed broadcasts, etc.) and protocols (notably Netbios) are blocked at the edge as well, if the equipment is capable. These are basic protections for the ISP as well as the client.

#5 pcrepairs

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Posted 19 June 2011 - 07:09 PM

I will look at the modems and see what type they are using.I know the setup is static ip on the computer unless a router is in use.They use a crossover cable to connect modem to computer.I think something is just not right with this setup and will check it out farther.If anything contact some of my clients and let them pass the idea of everyone use a router.Its a small close nit community. News travels fast.Thanks for your response.




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