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Securing the US Passport? Or not?


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14 replies to this topic

#1 Grinler

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Posted 28 October 2004 - 01:17 PM

US Passports soon to have embedded chips in them that can broadcast the owners name, address, and digital photo to a electronic reader.I am all for trying to make this country as secure as possible, but does this strike anyone else as scary? With this type of technology and electronic readers spread throughout the country, a person can be tracked wherever they go.

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#2 cowsgonemadd3

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Posted 28 October 2004 - 03:30 PM

Grinler its the end times! This is not going to stop. Its part ot the mark of the beast. Soon they will go into all people(the tracking chips). In there hands or forehead(its in the Bible).
Its a shame the world has to get this way! All for the sake of safety and it will be new "safety technology" that will hurt us.
Oh well.

Edited by cowsgonemadd3, 28 October 2004 - 03:31 PM.


#3 tg1911

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Posted 28 October 2004 - 05:26 PM

"Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary
Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety."
~Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790), reply of the Pennsylvania Assembly to the
governor, November 11, 1755

" 'Necessity' is the plea for every infringement of human liberty; it is the
argument of tyrants; it is the creed of slaves."
~William Pitt

"Security is mostly a superstition. It does not exist in nature, nor do the
children of men as a whole experience it. . .Avoiding danger is no safer in
the long run than outright exposure. . . Life is either a daring adventure or
nothing."
~Helen Keller (1880 - 1968)

Edited by tg1911, 28 October 2004 - 05:35 PM.

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#4 KoanYorel

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Posted 28 October 2004 - 05:27 PM

AMEN!

THANK YOU "tg1911" FOR REMINDING US ALL FROM WHERE OUR BASIC FREEDOMS BEGIN!

Edited by KoanYorel, 28 October 2004 - 05:31 PM.

The only easy day was yesterday.

...some do, some don't; some will, some won't (WR)

#5 tg1911

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Posted 28 October 2004 - 05:41 PM

AMEN!

THANK YOU "tg1911" FOR REMINDING US ALL FROM WHERE OUR BASIC FREEDOMS BEGIN!

My pleasure!
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#6 Scarlett

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Posted 28 October 2004 - 05:48 PM

Unfortunatly the threat of terrorisim has opened the door for Big Brother to come stomping in. Passports aren't the only instance of this. The RFID Chips are a reality. The FDA approved the VeriChip ID implant for
medical use in humans (along with a whole class of similar implants). While VeriChip promoters discuss only the "benefits" of chip implantation, CASPIAN researchers have uncovered a host of serious
potential medical dangers associated with the VeriChip. The outlined details in the press release below and in a special web
report at:
VeriChipImplant

Here are some related links: SpyChips NoCards BoycottGillete

Edited by scarlett, 28 October 2004 - 05:57 PM.

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#7 Grinler

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Posted 28 October 2004 - 06:19 PM

:thumbsup: but I love your signature scarlett

#8 Scarlett

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Posted 28 October 2004 - 06:25 PM

OMG I'm so sorry. I thought that it was decidedly related. Oh, and Thanks! :thumbsup: Happy Halloween! :flowers: (p.s. Would u like for me to edit it?)

Edited by scarlett, 28 October 2004 - 06:29 PM.

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#9 KoanYorel

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Posted 28 October 2004 - 06:46 PM

NO need to edit Scarlett,

We respect your opinion as such.

Edited by KoanYorel, 28 October 2004 - 06:46 PM.

The only easy day was yesterday.

...some do, some don't; some will, some won't (WR)

#10 jgweed

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Posted 28 October 2004 - 06:49 PM

Just as scary is the push for a national driver's liscence or ID; before long there will be checkpoints with police demanding," papers!!"

No matter how plausible or rational some arguments for new security schemes may be, the price we will all pay is diminished liberty now, and tyranny in the future.

Regards to all,
John
Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one should be silent.

#11 cowsgonemadd3

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Posted 28 October 2004 - 10:22 PM

Very good info on the RFID chips it should be a whole topic! Needs to be spread I think I will go by a gilet razor and see for myself! Cool! ANd scary!

#12 Grinler

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Posted 28 October 2004 - 10:41 PM

OMG I'm so sorry. I thought that it was decidedly related. Oh, and Thanks! :thumbsup: Happy Halloween!  :flowers: (p.s. Would u like for me to edit it?)

Ack...i guess i should not have used that smiley :trumpet: I meant I was going off topic with the comment about your signature...sorry about the confusion.

#13 Scarlett

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Posted 28 October 2004 - 10:50 PM

OMG I'm so sorry. I thought that it was decidedly related. Oh, and Thanks! :inlove: Happy Halloween!  :trumpet: (p.s. Would u like for me to edit it?)

Ack...i guess i should not have used that smiley :flowers: I meant I was going off topic with the comment about your signature...sorry about the confusion.

Hey thats cool. :thumbsup: And once again, thanks! 'Tis the season. I thought I'd dress up the Sig and Av for the occasion. :cool:

Edited by scarlett, 28 October 2004 - 11:33 PM.

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#14 Ronbo

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Posted 28 October 2004 - 10:55 PM

I seem to recall they were contemplating doing something like this with money also. Soon not only will they be able to track where you are, but how much cash you have with you also. Being such a scary topic Posted Image, I guess Halloween is good time to discuss the issue.
There is no justice, there is just us.

#15 Scarlett

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Posted 02 November 2004 - 08:22 AM

Yet another interesting bit of info. It seems that we are damned if we do, and damned if we don't. :thumbsup:

Is Big Brother Listening to Your Chat Room Conversations?

The U.S. government recently funded a study through the National Science Foundation to come up with a way to monitor conversations in online chat forums for signs of terrorist communications:
http://www.winxpnews.com/rd/rd.cfm?id=041102ED-Study

The AP story on this by Michael Hill was picked up by just about every computer news outlet on the Web; if you do a Google search for "chat surveillance," you'll find dozens of hits quoting the article, along with various commentary.

Few would deny that the government should be doing whatever it can to detect and prevent future terrorist attacks, but such activities always raise a red flag for privacy advocates, who are concerned about the potential of a "slippery slope" that could lead to the use of tactics originally conceived as anti-terrorism tools to be expanded to be used against other criminals and, ultimately, the populace at large. Certainly, the idea of the FBI or CIA listening in on chat rooms could put a damper on discussions. Already, many folks are at the point where they're afraid to joke about certain subjects in e-mail for fear of misinterpretation if their messages should be intercepted.

Of course, chat room surveillance by law enforcement is nothing new. Police and federal agents have been using the practice for a long time to ferret out pedophiles and child pornographers. Often officers do much more than passively monitor the chats, setting up "stings" in which they pretend to be children or teenagers and attempt to lure the suspects into incriminating communications or in-person meetings. It's a widely accepted method of cracking down on this type of crime.

One can argue that you have no expectation of privacy in a public chat room that's open to everyone on the Internet. Others argue that if the government plans to monitor specific forums, that information should be made available to the users of those forums so that innocent parties could opt out. Of course, that would effectively negate the value of monitoring, since the not-so-innocent would be forewarned as well.

Back to the study: the research is geared toward constructing computer models that would analyze chat patterns and perhaps target key words to determine what conversations are likely to be terrorist communications, without having human beings actually listen/read the text of all the conversations. In theory, at least, this would tend to protect those engaged in innocent chatter and allow authorities to focus on only those exhibiting suspicious behavior.

The question comes down to this: how accurate will the software be? Computer programs are notoriously unable to distinguish such subtleties as sarcasm or humor. Will all chat participates need to start censoring themselves and avoiding any references or particular words that might be tagged by the system, in the same way one must refrain from saying "hi" to one's friend Jack in a busy airport? Is such self-censorship just the price we must pay for living in dangerous times, or is it an unacceptable infringement on free speech? Should be government stay out of our Internet communications - or should law enforcement agents work harder to mine all that data going over the public network to gather information to protect us from the bad guys?


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