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Trojan:DOS/Alureon.A


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#1 MTHT

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Posted 15 June 2011 - 08:10 AM

I have been asked to look into problems on a PC for a family member as it is Blue screening and not completed a MS Windows Update since 19/12/2010. I'm no computer expert, but agreeded to look into the problem. Norton 360 is installed and also MS Security essentials - Norton was not having any problems, MS Security essentialy kept crashing out. I thought initally it was a HDD space problem as has only 8% free of 138GB. Uninstalled an selection of programs that they have the disks for, backed up photos, docs, etc. to a flash drive and cleared space. This has not released more than a 2% space and now I'm really confused.

I have found that the MS security essentials is now completing a scan and confirming it has found the above trojan, but it cannot fix the problem, it has quarantined the file. I have currently got a full system scan running through MS Security essentials to check for further problems. Could the trojan be the problem of such a large amount of disk space being used as well?? I cannot find anything obvious to account for it on the c: drive, although there are lots of folders labeled with stragne names that I do not have access to open or delete, such as:

78b1625444133e7700
8a85ca20ec54e59da8b7ae

and another 9 folders with the same weird names, with modification dates ranging from 21/09/2010 13:08 to 17/05/2011 22:03

I appreciate all your help as I know you are busy. I'll check back in a few days!!

Regards Teresa

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#2 quietman7

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Posted 15 June 2011 - 08:38 PM

Please follow these instructions: How to remove Google Redirects or the TDSS, TDL3, Alureon rootkit using TDSSKiller
  • Double-click on TDSSKiller.exe to run the tool for known TDSS variants.
    Vista/Windows 7 users right-click and select Run As Administrator.
  • When the program opens, click the Start Scan button.
  • Any objects found, will show in the Scan results - Select action for found objects and offer three options.
  • If an infected file is detected, the default action will be Cure...do not change it.

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  • Click Continue > Reboot now to finish the cleaning process.<- Important!!

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  • If 'Suspicious' objects are detected, you will be given the option to Skip or Quarantine. Skip will be the default selection. Leave it as such for now.
  • A log file named TDSSKiller_version_date_time_log.txt will be created and saved to the root directory (usually Local Disk C:).
  • Copy and paste the contents of that file in your next reply.
-- If TDSSKiller does not run, try renaming it. To do this, right-click on TDSSKiller.exe, select Rename and give it a random name with the .com file extension (i.e. 123abc.com). If you do not see the file extensio, please refer to these instructions. In some cases it may be necessary to redownload TDSSKiller and randomly rename it before downloading and saving to the computer or to perform the scan in "safe mode".

-- For any files detected as 'Suspicious' (except those identified as Forged to be cured after reboot) get a second opinion by submitting to Jotti's virusscan or VirusTotal. In the "File to upload & scan" box, browse to the location of the suspicious file and submit (upload) it for scanning/analysis.

Step 7 instructs you to scan your computer using Malwarebytes Anti-Malware. Don't forget to check for database definition updates through the program's interface (preferable method) before scanning.

Malwarebytes may "make changes to your registry" as part of its disinfection routine. If using other security programs that detect registry changes (ie Spybot's Teatimer), they may interfere or alert you. Temporarily disable such programs or permit them to allow the changes.
  • After completing the scan, a log report will open in Notepad.
  • The log is automatically saved and can be viewed by clicking the Logs tab .
  • Copy and paste the contents of that report in your next reply. Be sure to post the complete log to include the top portion which shows the database version and your operating system.
  • Exit Malwarebytes when done.
Note: If Malwarebytes encounters a file that is difficult to remove, you will be asked to reboot your computer so it can proceed with the disinfection process. If asked to restart the computer, please do so immediately. Failure to reboot normally will prevent Malwarebytes from removing all the malware.

-- Some types of malware will target Malwarebytes Anti-Malware and other security tools to keep them from running properly. If that's the case, please refer to the suggestions provided in For those having trouble running Malwarebytes Anti-Malware as you may need to rename it or use RKill by Grinler.


Norton 360 is installed and also MS Security essentials

IMPORTANT NOTE: Using more than one anti-virus program is not advisable. Why? The primary concern with doing so is due to conflicts that can arise when they are running in real-time mode simultaneously and issues with Windows resource management. Even if one of them is disabled for use as a stand-alone scanner, it can affect the other and cause conflicts. Anti-virus software components insert themselves into the operating systems core and using more than one can cause instability, crash your computer, slow performance and waste system resources. When actively running in the background while connected to the Internet, they both may try to update their definition databases at the same time. As the programs compete for resources required to download the necessary files this often can result in sluggish system performance or unresponsive behavior.

Each anti-virus may interpret the activity of the other as suspicious behavior and there is a greater chance of them alerting you to a "False Positive". If one finds a virus or a suspicious file and then the other also finds the same, both programs will be competing over exclusive rights on dealing with that virus or suspicious file. Each anti-virus may attempt to remove the offending file and quarantine it at the same time resulting in a resource management issue as to which program gets permission to act first. If one anit-virus finds and quarantines the file before the other one does, then you encounter the problem of both wanting to scan each other's zipped or archived files and each reporting the other's quarantined contents. This can lead to a repetitive cycle of endless alerts that continually warn you that a threat has been found when that is not the case.

Anti-virus scanners use virus definitions to check for malware and these can include a fragment of the virus code which may be recognized by other anti-virus programs as the virus itself. Because of this, many anti-virus vendors encrypt their definitions so that they do not trigger a false alarm when scanned by other security programs. Other vendors do not encrypt their definitions and they can trigger false alarms when detected by the resident anti-virus. Further, dual installation is not always possible because most of the newer anti-virus programs will detect the presence of others and may insist they be removed prior to download and installation of another. If the installation does complete with another anti-virus already installed, you may encounter issues like system freezing, unresponsiveness or similar symptoms while trying to use it.

To avoid these problems, use only one anti-virus solution. Deciding which one to remove is your choice. Be aware that you may lose your subscription to that anti-virus program's virus definitions once you uninstall that software.

Anti-virus vendors recommend that you install and run only one anti-virus program at a timeYou can always supplement your anti-virus by performing an Online Virus Scan.
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