Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Dual Core Processor


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 SysTech Guy

SysTech Guy

  • Members
  • 130 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:29 PM

Posted 31 May 2011 - 03:29 PM

I am not much of a hardware guy, so excuse my basic question.

I am trying to determine if an XP Pro machine meets certain specs, specifically if it has a dual core processor.

Machine number 1 is definitely dual core. When I open the computer properties, it says pentium dual Core CPU E5200 @ 2.50Ghz 2.49GHz. Also, when I open up the task manager, I see two windows for CPU utilization.

However, for Machine number 2, the CPU is a Intel Pentium 4 CPU 2.320GHz 2.19 Ghz. It also has two windows for Cpu utilization in the task manager. Even though it specifically does not say that it is dual core, can I assume that it is?

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Andrew

Andrew

    Bleepin' Night Watchman


  • Moderator
  • 8,260 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Right behind you
  • Local time:05:29 PM

Posted 31 May 2011 - 03:43 PM

There are a number of ways to find out the number of CPU cores on your system:

From a Command Prompt:
wmic cpu get NumberOfCores

From the Registry, look at:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\HARDWARE\DESCRIPTION\System\CentralProcessor
There will be a numbered subkey for each processor core (i.e. "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\HARDWARE\DESCRIPTION\System\CentralProcessor\0", "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\HARDWARE\DESCRIPTION\System\CentralProcessor\1")

Use a tool like CPU-Z:
Posted Image

#3 hamluis

hamluis

    Moderator


  • Moderator
  • 56,553 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Killeen, TX
  • Local time:07:29 PM

Posted 31 May 2011 - 03:51 PM

I would. If task manager reflects two cores, it has two cores.

Some Pentiums are actually dual-core, see Example .

Intel has gone to great pains...to muddy the water about its processor names, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pentium_Dual-Core , so you can't just go by the name of the processor.

More Info

Louis

#4 SysTech Guy

SysTech Guy
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 130 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:29 PM

Posted 01 June 2011 - 07:42 PM

On more than one machine, I run the command 'wmic cpu get numberofcores' I get a return of:
Number of Cores
1

However, when I go to the registry and look at the key:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\HARDWARE\DESCRIPTION\System\CentralProcessor

I see two keys: 0 and 1.

When I run the vbscript:
Set oShell = WScript.CreateObject("WScript.Shell")
Set oEnv = oShell.Environment("SYSTEM")
WScript.Echo oEnv("NUMBER_OF_PROCESSORS")

I get a return of '2'.

The processor is a Pentium 4 CPU 3.20 Ghz 3.19 Ghz
The fact that it has two processor speeds, does that mean dual core?

#5 Andrew

Andrew

    Bleepin' Night Watchman


  • Moderator
  • 8,260 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Right behind you
  • Local time:05:29 PM

Posted 01 June 2011 - 07:59 PM

No. The first speed listed is the processor's official stock speed as stated by Intel whereas the second is the reading of the actual current speed as measured by the system. The difference between the two is likely due to rounding.

Many higher-end Pentium4 processors had something called Hyper Threading. Hyper Threading is sort of a pseudo dual-core technology that makes a single core look like 2 (and perform like around 1.5) actual processors. To many (most) utilities like the Task Manager, it would appear as though you have 2 cores whereas in reality you have only one but with a little extra oomf. If your CPU is Hyper Threaded, it would explain why some tools say you have 1 core and others say you have 2. These 2 cores are called "Logical Processors" (as opposed to physical ones)

You can use WMIC again to see how many Logical Processors you have:

wmic cpu get NumberOfLogicalProcessors

Since the wmic cpu get NumberOfCores command says 1, then that's how many physical cores your processor has (so it's not a dual-core) If it has 2 Logical Processors (which is what wmic cpu get NumberOfLogicalProcessors tells you), then you may be able to squeak by with programs that require a dual-core or higher, but don't expect miracles.

Edited by Andrew, 01 June 2011 - 08:06 PM.


#6 SysTech Guy

SysTech Guy
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 130 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:29 PM

Posted 03 June 2011 - 07:57 AM

Excellent explanation.

Thank you




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users