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Trouble and error messages after windows loads


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#1 RB_Kandy

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 01:18 AM

I am running Windows XP professional, 32 bit, Service Pack 3

I have this problem, half the time I restart my computer I get error messages once windows has loaded. All of these errors involve Generic Host Process For Win32 and svhost.exe
The effect it has on my computer is half the time things aren't working. Every once in a while it's my sound card. Other times programs won't load, things like Internet Explorer, Task Manager, and even pressing the power button won't shut down my computer.

This began happening right after I made a lot of changes to my computer, including installing and uninstalling old software, and using a registry cleaner, all in an effort to get my new modem, new Ethernet adapter, and new router to work. So lots of changes were made.

I've tried scanning for viruses and stuff using Comodo, Spybot S&D, and Malwarebytes, but nothing ever shows up as infected. I tried check disk, it reports no errors.

And now for the error messages I get
Because I get different errors and combinations of them, I will list the three types I get, then duplicates containing different error signatures.

1. Svhost.exe application error
The instruction at 0x7c9100e8 referenced memory at 0x00000010 the memory could not be read. Click OK to Terminate.

2. Generic Host Process For Win32 Services
Has encountered a problem and needs to close.
Error Signature:
szAppName: svhost.exe szAppVer: 5.1.2600.5512 szModName: ntdll.dll szModVer: 5.1.2600.5755 offset: 000100e8

3. Data Execution Prevention: Generic Host Process For Win32 Services (then rambles on about the function of data execution prevention).

Here are some variants of these messages.

Generic Host Process -
EventType: BEX P1: svhost.exe P2: 0.0.0.0 P3:00000000 P4: unknown P5: 0.0.0.0 P6: 00000000 P7: 00000000 P8: c0000005 P9: 00000008

Generic Host Process -
szAppName: svhost.exe szAppVer: 0.0.0.0 szModName: unknown szModVer: 0.0.0.0 offset: 00000000

I have attached a txt of the dump file. I can't make heads or tails out of that stuff maybe you guys can. It's the text file called "appcompat.txt" created on error, I'm guessing that's a txt version of the dmp file.

Attached Files



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#2 eliedrian1996

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 01:31 AM

svhost.exe looks wrong... Isn't it supposed to be svchost.exe? What you have there might be malware

#3 RB_Kandy

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 02:16 AM

I've double checked the error messages, it is svchost, and not svhost. It was an error on my part, I was copying the error down by hand, I seen svchost, and just kept writing svhost.

#4 hamluis

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 06:49 AM

Let's try this.

Download/install BlueScreenView, http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/blue_screen_view.html.

Double-click BlueScreenView.exe file.

When scanning is done, select Edit/Select All...then File/Save Selected Items.

Save the report as BSOD.txt.


Open BSOD.txt in Notepad, copy all content and paste it into your next reply.

Louis

#5 Allan

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 07:00 AM

This began happening right after I made a lot of changes to my computer, including installing and uninstalling old software, and using a registry cleaner, all in an effort to get my new modem, new Ethernet adapter, and new router to work. So lots of changes were made.


There's your problem. Registry cleaners CAUSE problems, they do not fix them. See if you can use system restore to go back to a point before you messed up the system. If not, you can try a repair install.

#6 hamluis

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 10:01 AM

Bleeping Computer DOES NOT recommend the use of registry cleaners/optimizers for several reasons:
  • Registry cleaners are extremely powerful applications that can damage the registry by using aggressive cleaning routines and cause your computer to become unbootable.

    The Windows registry is a central repository (database) for storing configuration data, user settings and machine-dependent settings, and options for the operating system. It contains information and settings for all hardware, software, users, and preferences. Whenever a user makes changes to settings, file associations, system policies, or installed software, the changes are reflected and stored in this repository. The registry is a crucial component because it is where Windows "remembers" all this information, how it works together, how Windows boots the system and what files it uses when it does. The registry is also a vulnerable subsystem, in that relatively small changes done incorrectly can render the system inoperable. For a more detailed explanation, read Understanding The Registry.
  • Not all registry cleaners are created equal. There are a number of them available but they do not all work entirely the same way. Each vendor uses different criteria as to what constitutes a "bad entry". One cleaner may find entries on your system that will not cause problems when removed, another may not find the same entries, and still another may want to remove entries required for a program to work.
  • Not all registry cleaners create a backup of the registry before making changes. If the changes prevent the system from booting up, then there is no backup available to restore it in order to regain functionality. A backup of the registry is essential BEFORE making any changes to the registry.
  • Improperly removing registry entries can hamper malware disinfection and make the removal process more difficult if your computer becomes infected. For example, removing malware related registry entries before the infection is properly identified can contribute to system instability and even make the malware undetectable to removal tools.
  • The usefulness of cleaning the registry is highly overrated and can be dangerous. In most cases, using a cleaner to remove obsolete, invalid, and erroneous entries does not affect system performance but it can result in "unpredictable results".

Unless you have a particular problem that requires a registry edit to correct it, I would suggest you leave the registry alone. Using registry cleaning tools unnecessarily or incorrectly could lead to disastrous effects on your operating system such as preventing it from ever starting again. For routine use, the benefits to your computer are negligible while the potential risks are great.
Louis

#7 RB_Kandy

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 05:16 PM

About the registry editer: I've been aware, to some degree, that these things aren't safe, I normally only use it after uninstalling something, and one of the components linger and cause problems. Now that I think about it, I may have actually used it last a month ago, when these error messages first began popping up, as a possible remedy. It's been so long I don't remember what my motive was for using it. But I think from now on I will leave registry editers alone, even when I am experiencing some sort of dll conflict or whatever.

To hamluis,
I downloaded and installed that piece of software, unfortunately it only collects Blue Screen Of Death errors. I don't have any, I'm not getting a BSOD; only applications errors telling me the app must be terminated.

To Allan,
About system restore, well if no one has any answers for me, I may have to try doing just that. However, I am a bit afraid to do that. A really long time ago, back when I used windows millennium, an attempt to restore my computer to an earlier date failed and rendered my computer unable to boot. But that was a different computer and a different OS. Anyhow, when I do a system restore, at any point will I have to insert my winxp CD?
The reason I ask is because my winxp disk can't be read completely (CD scratches on certain tracks). If my winxp disk worked, I'd partition this drive, backup all my media files onto the partition, reformat primary partition, and reinstall winxp.

Anyhow, if no one has any solutions, I better get to work dusting off the old 2 gig backup drive just in case a system restore fails. I keep a copy of Winxp on it just in case I mess my computer up that bad LOL. But I was really hoping to be able to fix this by isolating which app was crashing generic host process and svchost, or possibly reinstalling svchost or something.

#8 Allan

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 05:22 PM

Just to clarify, we're discussing registry "cleaners", not editors - but I assume that's just a typo on your part. As for waiting for some other answer, I'm afraid there isn't one. Unless you've been diligent enough to use disk imaging software (as, in my opinion, EVERY user should), your best option is system restore. Backup critical data (as you should anyway) and then use system restore to go back to before the problems appeared.

A repair install is also an option, but system restore is more likely to do the job.

#9 hamluis

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 06:01 PM

Well...I agree with Allan about what's going on, especially in light of the fact that these are all Event Viewer errors.

If it were me, I'd do a repair install of Windows, if possible...although that doesn't always solve the problem.

Louis




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