Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Can't remove trojan.gen-injector


  • Please log in to reply
1 reply to this topic

#1 SOLOWPOET

SOLOWPOET

  • Members
  • 2 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:01:48 PM

Posted 18 May 2011 - 01:55 AM

Ok Guy's got this thing threw email..
I think the Virus Name is: Gen:Variant.Bredo.21 (Results from Virustotal scan of the zip)
System is emachines T3124 Running win XP W/ SP2.
Superantispyware deleted it but was right back on re-start and re-scan.

Here's a sreenshot of SuperAntispyware log .

First time it was in Docs And Settings..

Thanks...Any help will be appreciated

Posted Image

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 quietman7

quietman7

    Bleepin' Janitor


  • Global Moderator
  • 51,128 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Virginia, USA
  • Local time:02:48 PM

Posted 19 May 2011 - 10:21 PM

The detected _restore{GUID}\RP***\A00*****.xxx file(s) identified by your scan are in the System Volume Information Folder (SVI) which is a part of System Restore. The *** after 'RP' represents a sequential number automatically assigned by the operating system. The ***** after 'A00' also represents a sequential number where the original file was backed up and renamed except for its extension. To learn more about this, refer to:System Restore is the feature that protects your computer by monitoring a core set of system and application files and by creating backups (snapshots saved as restore points) of vital system configurations and files before changes are made. These restore points can be used to "roll back" your computer to a clean working state in the event of a problem. This makes it possible to undo harmful changes to your system configurations including registry modifications made by software or malware by reverting the operating systems configuration to an earlier date. See What's Restored when using System Restore and What's Not.

The SVI folder is protected by permissions that only allow the system to have access and is hidden by default on the root of every drive, partition or volume including most external drives, and some USB flash drives. For more detailed information, read System Restore Overview and How it works and How antivirus software and System Restore work together.

System Restore is enabled by default and will back up the good as well as malevolent files, so when malware is present on the system it gets included in restore points as an A00***** file. If you only get a detection on a file in the SVI folder, that means the original file was on your system in another location at some point and probably has been removed. However, when you scan your system with anti-virus or anti-malware tools, you may receive an alert that a malicious file was detected in the SVI folder (in System Restore points) but the anti-virus software was unable to remove it. Since the SVI folder is a protected directory, most anti-virus and scanning tools cannot access it to disinfect or delete these files. If not removed, they sometimes can reinfect your system if you accidentally use an old restore point.

If your anti-virus or anti-malware tool cannot move the files to quarantine, they sometimes can reinfect your system if you accidentally use an old restore point. In order to avoid reinfection and remove these file(s) if your security tools cannot remove them, the easiest thing to do after disinfection is Create a New Restore Point to enable your computer to "roll-back" to a clean working state and use Disk Cleanup to remove all but the most recent restore point. Vista and Windows 7 users can refer to these links: Create a New Restore Point in Vista or Windows 7 and Disk Cleanup in Vista.
.
.
Windows Insider MVP 2017-2018
Microsoft MVP Reconnect 2016
Microsoft MVP Consumer Security 2007-2015 kO7xOZh.gif
Member of UNITE, Unified Network of Instructors and Trusted Eliminators

If I have been helpful & you'd like to consider a donation, click 38WxTfO.gif




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users