Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Basics Of A Server and Networking


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 fEaR iTsElF510

fEaR iTsElF510

  • Members
  • 41 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:08:17 AM

Posted 11 May 2011 - 11:42 PM

Hello, im starting to get into the Networking and Server aspect of the computer world. Im good with computers i understand much of the world of computers. But when it comes to Networking id love to learn more. Next year i plan on Joining Cisco Networking Academy which i will spend 2 hours a day at. They will start with network basics but i want a headstart. My first question is in any term describe what a server is. Why is it needed....why do people go out and buy servers that seem to have lower specs than that of a PC i could build. On big servers i notice several server blades....what is a server blase and if there are several how are they connected and how would they communicate? All the thanks in the world go's out to anyone who can help me understand and learn the world of networking.

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Baltboy

Baltboy

    Bleepin' Flame Head


  • Members
  • 1,432 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Pennsylvania
  • Local time:12:17 PM

Posted 20 May 2011 - 04:06 PM

First things first is to answer what is a server. The definition of a server is any computer that has a server OS installed on it. So the only real thing seperating a desktop from a server is the OS itself. Hardware means nothing as long as it can support the needs of the OS. Servers can provide many services that desktops cannot. Domain creation is a large one since it can then apply multitudes of settings, security, and tracking to the networked computers that are part of the domain. Of course they can supply other services like, dhcp, dns, file hosting, proxy server, email hosting, and a multitude of other services. While desktops can supply some of these services servers are better able to host larger numbers of clients by design and their ability to address more resourses. Keep in mind when looking at a server they mostly just shuffle data so their need for graphics, sound, and other multi media type equipment is almost non-existant. They only need a decent processor, lots of system memory, and a large fast storage sub system. Required system specs are determined by the needs of the OS plus the number of clients that will be accessing the system.

Blades are a way to consolidate large numbers of servers into a smaller space. They are smaller usually 1 to 4 processor based servers that are diskless. The large rack you see is the blade "center" that houses the blade interface, power supplies, IO blades, and possibly the disk sub system. The OS and other data are stored on SAN type storage which can be on the blade center or anywhere else since they are network based.
Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please.
Mark Twain

#3 Sneakycyber

Sneakycyber

    Network Engineer


  • BC Advisor
  • 6,130 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ohio
  • Local time:12:17 PM

Posted 20 May 2011 - 05:21 PM

I am currently in the Cisco academy classes. I will give you some pointers and answer any questions you have. I'm on mobile right now so I will be brief and answer your above questions when I get home.
Chad Mockensturm 
Network Engineer
Certified CompTia Network +, A +

#4 Sneakycyber

Sneakycyber

    Network Engineer


  • BC Advisor
  • 6,130 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ohio
  • Local time:12:17 PM

Posted 20 May 2011 - 11:38 PM

Well Baltboy answered the server question as well as I could have. I have taken so far Networking For Small Home or Business and Working for a Small-To-Medium Business or ISP (these are the names provided by Cisco not my College which are EET-281 and EET-282) I will take the next 2 modules this fall (there only half a semester or 9 weeks long). I am currently studying for the CCENT certification Exam (Exam 1 of the 2 part CCNA Exam Series).

At My college there is always a Hands on Skills exam you are required to perform for the instructor and you MUST pass this in order to pass the class (along with the rest of the curriculum) The fist course will introduce you to the Computer and its components, Introduce you to dotted decimal to binary conversion (If you are taking the CCNA exam pay Attention here), to Subnetting and Network Addressing (If you Are taking the CCNA exam pay ATTENTION HERE, Give a brief overview of the OSI and TCP/IP networking models (If you are taking the CCNA exam pay ATTENTION HERE) Introduce you to an ISR (Integrated Service Router AKA: Personal or Home Routers), Teach you how to set-up Cisco home routers and DMZ ( this was part of our skills exam), Give you an Overview of the Internet and How a Consumer connects to the ISP and how the ISP is connected to the Internet, and introduce you to Packet Tracer a program Provided by Cisco that allows you to Set-up and program a network in a virtual workspace.

A note on Packet Tracer allot of your labs can be done on your home network and on the packet tracer Virtual network, however if you have a Skills exam you will need to know how to connect to and perform the required tasks on the Classroom equipment. You don't want to wait until your last lab to finally work on the equipment (a point your instructor will make in class). Work Ahead in the labs and don't let them pile up you will be thank full when you get to a chapter with allot of labs (There are allot of labs in the Second class and they are VERY long) Read the chapter before the lecture so you can follow along. If you are already experienced in computer hardware as I was this class will be a refresher on the PC portion don't be quick to assume you know everything however, you will be surprised on how much you will learn.

In the second class you will focus primarily on Subnetting and Programing Cisco Enterprise Service Routers and switches. You will be using the Cisco 1841, 2620 and 2621 routers and 2960 switches in Packet tracer. What you have in your classroom may be different however the Cisco IOS will be the same. I performed 90% of my programming in packet tracer and its the exact same on the routers themselves. I practiced most of my bigger labs on both packet tracer and the physical classroom equipment.

Lastly you may be tempted during your subnetting labs to use an internet subnetting calculator and to use a Binary to Dotted decimal conversion program. I strongly advise against this since you can only use a pencil and a piece of notebook paper on your Final and on the CCNA exams. If you use the Calculator and other programs you will be totally lost and you won't pass your class or any of the exams. I used them during my first several labs and I had to learn later how to do the calculations and how to sub net. Its best to use them to check your work and do the math on paper. In the second class you will also focus on Trouble shooting a network and using the OSI model as a basis for troubleshooting.

Here is a picture of Lab 9.4.2 Router Rip Trouble shooting. It is near the end of your Second class that is a challenge lab you will need to trouble shoot the programming of All three routers and determine why you are unable to communicate across the entire network. It took me 2 days to figure out.
Posted Image




Edited by Sneakycyber, 20 May 2011 - 11:46 PM.

Chad Mockensturm 
Network Engineer
Certified CompTia Network +, A +




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users