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Beeps and Reports wrong CPU Temp


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#1 st9988

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Posted 08 May 2011 - 10:34 AM

Hi. I have a HP Pavilion a1540n which has a A8m2n-la motherboard. I am running Windows XP. I have been having problems for almost a month now. It started when my computer refused to start up and instead kept beeping. I read somewhere it could mean a memory problem, so I removed and reseated the 2 memory sticks I have. The problem seemingly went away, but a week later when booting up, the computer gave an error message "CPU FAN FAILED". I purchased a replacement fan and installed it over the CPU. The computer seemed fine for a few days and then the "CPU FAN FAILED" message appeared again. This message would appear 50% of the time and I would not be able to start up the computer. Other times the computer would make it to the black XP logo with the blue bar scrolling, but then get stuck there. About 1 out of 5 times, the computer would actually fully start up into XP. I also began getting the beeps every so often again.

I checked the bios and realized the memory stick in slot 1 was not showing up. In the BIOS, I also noticed my CPU Fan and System FAN both had 0 rpm even though they were spinning. The CPU temperature reported 239 C/209 F, which doesn't make sense. I removed the memory stick in slot 1 and the computer seemed fine for about a day. The BIOS was reporting the correct CPU temperature and CPU and System Fan RPM during that time. The problem came back, however, and now beeps every other time I try to start up. Other times the computer doesn't get past the black XP logo. In the BIOS it usually reports a CPU and System Fan RPM and correct CPU temperature for about 10 seconds. After 10 seconds the CPU and system fan RPM become 0 and the CPU temperature just reads 239 C/209 F.

I have no idea what is wrong and any help would be appreciated.

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#2 MrBruce1959

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Posted 08 May 2011 - 02:34 PM

Hello and welcome to Bleepingcomputer.

There are a number of things that can cause problems with a computer booting up properly.

The list can be rather long one as to what is actually causing these problems with your system.

What are the beep codes that you are hearing when the system fails to boot up?

Here is what I would do, I would completely dismantle this system, if you are not fully knowledgeable with building a computer, I would seriously take notes and make diagrams of how everything was before you start taking the system apart, this way you have an idea how things were before hand.

Warning: Before proceding with any attempts to repair or modify the inside of any computer, be sure to ground yourself to the computer's metal case before and at all times while you are performing this task.
The human body is capable of storing lethal amounts of static electricity, which is capable of destroying the sensitive electronic components which are located inside a computer.


If it is helpful take pictures, those will be very helpful as well in case you run into problems.

Now back to the dismantling part, I would remove the CPU from its slot, make sure the contacts look okay in the CPU slot, make sure the CPU looks okay.

If there is any old thermal grease on both the CPU header and heat sink, carefully remove that, I suggest using a quick drying cleaning solution such as using a house-hold alcohol such as isopropyl alcohol 70% and a clean rag.

Try not to bend any pins on the CPU or its slot!!

When you put the CPU back into its slot and it is locked down properly, make sure you add a bead of thermal grease to the CPU header, do not add much, too much is as bad as not having any at all!

The CPU header would be the highest part of the CPU that mates with the heat sink when it is installed.

Re-install the heat sink and make sure it is level, sometimes it happens that it looks level, but isn't, so please be very observant to this, double check it.

Make sure the CPU cooling fan is fully operational, spins a few cycles after spinning it with your finger, place it on the heat sink and make sure when you connect the CPU cooling fan's power plug to the motherboard you connect it to the one marked CPU_FAN, this is very important that is on the correct power port on the motherboard, there are sensors on the motherboard that are specific to the CPU fan speed pick up sensor built into this cooling fan.

Slots through out a computer can suffer from oxidation, they are made of metal and metal corrodes and oxidizes over time, this causes problems with electrical connections, it acts as a barrier, one moment the circuit works, the next moment it doesn't, over time it becomes persistent, the connection does not happen at all, the circuits involved then fail.

By dissembling the system, you are disturbing all possibilities of corrosion and oxidation build up, you are also eliminating the possibility of a loose connection.

While you are examining the motherboard, you need to observe the condition of the electrolytic capacitors, those are those large round cylinders that are located around the motherboard, if those have failed, or they are leaking, they loose their value and purpose and cause the circuit they are a part of to act erratically and eventual failure of the circuit.

These two links will provide you with enough information on what you should be looking for.


http://www.capacitorlab.com/visible-failures/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capacitor_plague


There is a process we use in trouble shooting computers by which we remove the motherboard from the tower, this eliminates the possibility of the motherboard shorting out to the metal frame of the tower.

The motherboard is removed from the tower and put on a table where it has no contact with metal objects.

During this process, everything from the system is disconnected with the exception of the critical components to get the motherboard to fire up.

That would mean the motherboard would have the following necessities hooked up to it in order for it to boot up.

PSU

Video card

Keyboard

Mouse


A system board can still boot without a hard drive attached to it, it will send a system error if you do not stop it from looking for a boot device, but if you enter the BIOS setup utility at POST, there won't be any POST errors at this point unless something is wrong with the motherboard.

This is how you determine a motherboard problem. Yet I want to mention, we have 3 things in this scenario that can cause a problem, the mouse, the keyboard or the video card can still cause issues at this point, the key is if you are getting errors here, usually the system will alert you that there is a keyboard, video card or possible mouse error.

If the system seems normal at this point, you shut the system down and add another piece of hardware, ONLY ADD ONE AT A TIME!

In this case we now want to add ONE stick of RAM to slot number one, if fail, try slot number two, if fail, try slot number 3.
If that stick fails in all of the slots, it is the RAM stick that is bad. Get rid of it!

If it works and no problems, DO NOT add more RAM yet, try adding the hard drive and set it up so you can boot to it, see how the system acts.

It might be slow due to the fact you are low on RAM, but at least you can test the system.

If all goes well, shut down and add stick number two, make sure you follow motherboard manual instructions, sometimes the RAM has to be installed in the correct slots or system errors can result!

Try adding more hardware until you either find a problem, to which you now found the culprit that was causing you the problems, or you may actually have your system completely re-assembled and find the problem has gone away completely and does not come back again.

That would mean you either had a corroded connection that is now corrected, or you had a loose connection that has been found and corrected.

Hope this helps.

Any questions or concerns...please feel free to ask.

Now it's time to send this up and look for the typos, I am sure I typed plenty of those as this is a long post! :wink:

Bruce.

Edited by MrBruce1959, 10 May 2011 - 01:19 AM.

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#3 st9988

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Posted 09 May 2011 - 08:34 PM

Thanks for responding. The most frustrating thing is sometimes the computer starts up just fine, other times it beeps without booting up, and other times it just gets stuck at the black xp screen. Every time I go to turn on the computer, I have no idea which one it will do.

I will try dismantling the motherboard per your instructions when I get a chance. When removing the CPU, am I just making sure everything looks ok and then putting it back? Is it ok if I post back after a couple of weeks? That's probably when I will get around to following all of your instructions.

#4 dc3

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Posted 09 May 2011 - 10:04 PM

When you replaced the CPU fan did you remove the heat sink from the CPU?

Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#5 dc3

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Posted 09 May 2011 - 10:04 PM

When you replaced the CPU fan did you remove the heat sink from the CPU?

Can you post the pattern of the beeps? These are usually long or short beeps in a specific pattern which indicate a specific problem.

Edited by dc3, 09 May 2011 - 10:09 PM.

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#6 st9988

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Posted 26 May 2011 - 10:20 AM

Sorry, for the late reply. I just got back. Yes, I replaced both the heat sink and the CPU FAN. I haven't taken apart the motherboard yet. As of right now the computer seems to be working just fine. It has been booting up properly since yesterday, when I got back. Whenever it used to beep, however, it was one long beep and one short beep. When the beeps first happened, I read it might be a memory stick issue. I moved the memory around, trying different slots and sometimes removed a stick. I still never got consistent results when booting up though.

#7 killerx525

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Posted 26 May 2011 - 05:03 PM

Have a look at this beep table and hopefully it should pin point the problem.

Edited by killerx525, 26 May 2011 - 05:03 PM.

>Michael 
System1: CPU- Intel Core i7-5820K @ 4.4GHz, CPU Cooler- Noctua NH-D14, RAM- G.Skill Ripjaws 16GB Kit(4Gx4) DDR3 2133MHz, SSD/HDD- Samsung 850 EVO 250GB/Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB/Seagate Barracuada 3TB, GPU- 2x EVGA GTX980 Superclocked @1360/MHz1900MHz, Motherboard- Asus X99 Deluxe, Case- Custom Mac G5, PSU- EVGA P2-1000W, Soundcard- Realtek High Definition Audio, OS- Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit
Games: APB: Reloaded, Hours played: 3100+  System2: Late 2011 Macbook Pro 15inch   OFw63FY.png


#8 st9988

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Posted 27 May 2011 - 11:50 AM

Last night the problems came back again. First it wouldn't load past the black XP boot screen. This morning it won't turn on at all and beeps again. It is a short beep, then long beep, then pause, then it repeats again. I will try to take apart the motherboard according to MRBRUCE's instructions.

#9 st9988

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Posted 27 May 2011 - 02:18 PM

So, I removed the motherboard. I didn't see any capacitors that looked bad.

I removed and reinstalled the CPU and CPU fan/heatsink. I connected the CPU fan to the motherboard. I connected the power supply, mouse, keyboard, and monitor back to the motherboard. Nothing else is connected and there is no memory stick in the motherboard.

I powered on the computer and it gives me the beeps again. Nothing shows up on the monitor, I just hear the beeps. What should I do now?

#10 MrBruce1959

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Posted 27 May 2011 - 07:21 PM

I just checked back through this thread and realized the support pages to your computer have not been posted yet, so here the link.

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/product?cc=us&dlc=en&product=3184140&lc=en&jumpid=reg_R1002_USEN

Motherboard Specifications, A8M2N-LA (NodusM)

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c00714578&tmp_task=prodinfoCategory&lc=en&dlc=en&cc=us&product=3184140

Monitor or TV is Blank after Starting the Computer

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=bph04760&tmp_task=solveCategory&lc=en&dlc=en&cc=us&product=3184140

Resolving Startup Problems in Windows XP, Me, and 98


http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=bph07173&tmp_task=solveCategory&lc=en&dlc=en&cc=us&product=3184140


BIOS Beep Codes

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=bph07107&lc=en&dlc=en&cc=us&product=3184140

1 short beep and 1 long beep = Memory problem


You have an Award BIOS utility, by tapping the F1 key at POST screen, can you enter the BIOS setup utility?

Bruce.
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#11 killerx525

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Posted 27 May 2011 - 11:07 PM

There's a good lead about the BIOS beeps. Replacement ram?

>Michael 
System1: CPU- Intel Core i7-5820K @ 4.4GHz, CPU Cooler- Noctua NH-D14, RAM- G.Skill Ripjaws 16GB Kit(4Gx4) DDR3 2133MHz, SSD/HDD- Samsung 850 EVO 250GB/Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB/Seagate Barracuada 3TB, GPU- 2x EVGA GTX980 Superclocked @1360/MHz1900MHz, Motherboard- Asus X99 Deluxe, Case- Custom Mac G5, PSU- EVGA P2-1000W, Soundcard- Realtek High Definition Audio, OS- Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit
Games: APB: Reloaded, Hours played: 3100+  System2: Late 2011 Macbook Pro 15inch   OFw63FY.png


#12 st9988

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Posted 28 May 2011 - 07:59 AM

I wasn't able to get into the BIOS since the computer just kept beeping and never sent a signal to the monitor.

I then inserted a memory stick into slot 1. The computer didn't beep, and I was able to press F1 to get into the BIOS. What should I try now?

@killerx525 I suspected a memory problem at first, but is it possible that both of my sticks failed at the same time? I originally tried removing 1 stick of ram and reseating the other stick of ram, but still getting inconsistent results. Sometimes the computer would boot up fine, other times it would beep, and sometimes not boot up past the black XP logo. The CPU Fan and System fan were also not being detected sometimes, so I thought maybe the problem was somewhere else.

#13 killerx525

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Posted 28 May 2011 - 08:51 AM

I would try Memtest86+ when you can get the computer to boot.

>Michael 
System1: CPU- Intel Core i7-5820K @ 4.4GHz, CPU Cooler- Noctua NH-D14, RAM- G.Skill Ripjaws 16GB Kit(4Gx4) DDR3 2133MHz, SSD/HDD- Samsung 850 EVO 250GB/Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB/Seagate Barracuada 3TB, GPU- 2x EVGA GTX980 Superclocked @1360/MHz1900MHz, Motherboard- Asus X99 Deluxe, Case- Custom Mac G5, PSU- EVGA P2-1000W, Soundcard- Realtek High Definition Audio, OS- Windows 10 Pro 64-Bit
Games: APB: Reloaded, Hours played: 3100+  System2: Late 2011 Macbook Pro 15inch   OFw63FY.png


#14 st9988

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Posted 28 May 2011 - 09:56 AM

The computer has been starting up fine into the BIOS consistently about 5 times already. If the memory stick is removed and there is no stick installed, the computer will only beep and not start up.

Should I try connecting other parts to the motherboard, ie. hard drive, etc?

@killerx I will look into memtest86+. I've never used it before. Will it tell me if my memory is indeed bad?

#15 MrBruce1959

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Posted 28 May 2011 - 06:01 PM

Just to add some clarification here, so you have a better understanding as to why you are getting a beep error when no RAM is installed on the motherboard.

The motherboard has a limited amount of memory built into the system BIOS ROM chip, it is just enough to execute the system check portion of the code. It detects a system error and executes an output in the way of a beep tone to the system speaker, thus the beep tone you are hearing when starting the system.

Since there is not enough Random Access Memory available, do to the lack of any RAM being installed, the system boot up process will halt at that point, with just that error being output to alert you of such error.

What I am saying to you is your system will not boot up properly if you do not have an adequate amount of memory installed to store the required operating system files, in order to make any parts of the operating system usable, it has to first be called into memory, where the system board can store and execute such files.

Hopefully you now have an understanding as to why you are getting system errors from the system BIOS in the way of a beep code.

Being that you have installed just one memory module into the RAM slot of the motherboard and the system has successfully booted into the BIOS setup utility is an indication that the system has detected a storage medium called Random Access Memory. It now has a place to temporarily store the executables required to load an operating system.

My explanation above is to explain to you why your system does not boot up properly when you do not have any RAM installed and to explain to you that the error you are getting is normal in a case such as this.

Getting back to your current status, you installed from what I have read, one RAM stick and now your system is booting into the BIOS setup utility, you are successfully getting there, because the system now recognizes the presence of RAM to which the boot strap can now store and execute the boot code from the operating system.

You can safely try adding one piece of hardware back into service and try booting the system up to see how far it will go without any system errors or system freeze ups.

Since loading the operating system is your primary goal, I would try connecting the hard drive which stores the operating system first and see if you can load the operating system.

Depending on your situation, if it fails, then you have a hard drive related issue, which we will discuss if we need to.
If the system boots to the hard drive successfully, it might appear slow due to the lack of adequate RAM since you are currently only using one RAM stick at this point.

You can run memtest86 if you feel you want to test just this stick alone, it is better to run it from DOS, in other words run it from a boot disk, not from with-in the windows operating system.

Add the rest of your hardware, once piece at a time and try booting the system each time to see the results until all your hardware is once again installed and functioning.

Finally, try adding that second RAM stick to your system and try booting it up again, if your system starts acting strangely or fails to boot once a piece of hardware or that second RAM stick has been added, you have now found the culprit that is causing the error or the system to hang.

If it is RAM related, this would indicate one of two things:

Number one, you have mis-matched RAM sticks that are not compatible with each other, or that are not compatible with your motherboard.

Number two, you could have a defective RAM module.

Check to make sure the RAM is compatible with your system board, check to make sure each stick is compatible with the other stick.

Also make sure you read through your motherboard owners manual in relation to installing the RAM modules into the proper slots. Some systems are fussy about which slots are used when more than one module is installed. In fact some RAM slots are color coded reflecting which slots are designed to work together.
If the wrong sequence is used, the system may not recognize the second stick that is installed.
Your motherboard owners manual should clearly make note of such a requirement that the modules be installed according to their recommendations.

This link below contains information regarding adding memory to your system.

Upgrading Memory (RAM)

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=bph03886&lc=en&dlc=en&cc=us&product=3184140

This is the information I found regarding your computers RAM specifications:

Memory
Component Attributes
Memory Installed 2 GB
Maximum allowed 4 GB* (4 x 1 GB)

*Actual available memory may be less
Speed supported PC2-4200 MB/sec
Type 240 pin, DDR2 SDRAM



Please try what I suggested above and let me know how things have turned out.

Bruce.
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