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Disk Defragmenting


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#1 Xantalen

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Posted 02 January 2006 - 10:51 AM

Okay I've been noticing that whenever I defrag my com, it seems like there is a lot more fragmented files each time. What exactly is a fragmented file. If it's bad what do I do about it?

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#2 jgweed

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Posted 02 January 2006 - 11:14 AM

Fragmented files are a way of life with Windows. Every time you delete or add a file, you can increase the fragmentation on your hard drive because of the way Windows dumps data willy-nilly into the first open space it finds, thus physically separating files that should be together for speed and ease of reading them. The more of this you do, the greater the chances of fragmentation.
Defragging is thus like sorting the cards in your bridge hand by suit and value rather than keeping them in the order you pick them up. A fragmented hard drive will cause the reading arm to jump all around the disk rather than finding all the related files (sayfor an application) more or less all bunched together; this slighly increases the time it takes to launch a program or find files within a folder.

I hope this helps explain defragging.
Regards,
John
Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one should be silent.

#3 Xantalen

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Posted 02 January 2006 - 01:49 PM

Okay thanks :thumbsup:

#4 turnip

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Posted 03 January 2006 - 07:37 AM

My two cents :thumbsup:
Continuous adding, removing and editing cause files to get divided into fragments and get scattered across the HD. Defragmenting is the process where scattered file clusters are consolidated into a contiguous arrangement thus making the task of accessing them easier and faster. This happens because the file data gets arranged in clusters that lie sequentially rather than in a non-contiguous fashion helping the natural way the hard discs read data. The optimal speed of the HD will in turn help its other performance partners such as the CPU/RAM/MOBO/video card work faster as well. Faster file access time for your HD would mean a better speed of actions such as loading of your Operating System, file transfers particularly for large files, searching of files, file saving and reading in general.Its good to defrag whenever a lot of files are added/deleted or once in a week, although sometimes, systems warrant daily defrag.

Okay I've been noticing that whenever I defrag my com, it seems like there is a lot more fragmented files each time. What exactly is a fragmented file. If it's bad what do I do about it?

You should run a disk cleanup, chkdsk and then defrag (if ur using the XP defragger, best done is safe mode)cos if some program interrupts while the defragger is running, files will not be defragmented. If ur doing it for the first time, it may take long. Or you can use third party tools that are faster and have advanced features. Here's a nice utility which is free.
http://www.majorgeeks.com/download.php?det=1207




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