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Trojan.ByteVerify detected by virus scanner


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#1 arc14716

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Posted 02 May 2011 - 04:07 PM

Early this morning (May 2nd, around 2:56am), Norton Internet Security detected and quarantined something called Trojan.ByteVerify on my computer. Later, I ran a full system scan and it didn't pick up the trojan virus or anything else. To play it safe, I also ran a scan using Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware, which didn't pick up anything. So far, there have been no problems with my computer since Norton picked up the virus.

I have a PC running Windows XP. I need to know what else I can do to make sure I don't have anything else lurking on my computer.

Thank you for your time.

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#2 quietman7

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Posted 03 May 2011 - 06:13 AM

Your scan results indicate a threat(s) was found in the Java cache.

When a browser runs an applet, the Java Runtime Environment (JRE) stores the downloaded files into its cache folder for quick execution later and better performance. Both legitimate and malicious applets, malicious Java class files are stored in the Java cache directory and your anti-virus may detect them as threats. The detection can indicate the presence of malicious code which could attempt to exploit a vulnerability in the JRE. For more specific information about Java exploits, please refer to Virus found in the Java cache directory.

Notification of these files as a threat does not always mean that a machine has been infected; it indicates that a program included the viral class file but this does not mean that it used the malicious functionality. As a precaution, I recommend clearing the entire cache manually to ensure everything is cleaned out:Alternatively, you can download and use TFC (Temp File Cleaner) by Old Timer, ATF Cleaner by Atribune for Windows 2000/XP/Vista or Browser-Cleaner.

Also be aware that older versions of Java have vulnerabilities that malicious sites can use to exploit and infect your system. That's why it is important to always use the most current Java Version and remove outdated Java components.Even Java advises users to always have the latest version of the Java since it contains security updates and improvements to previous versions.

The latest Java version contains important enhancements to improve performance, stability and security of the Java applications that run on your machine. Installing this free update will ensure that your Java applications continue to run safely and efficiently.

Why should I upgrade to the latest Java version?
Why should I upgrade to Java 6?

You can verify (test) your JAVA Software Installation & Version here.
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#3 arc14716

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Posted 03 May 2011 - 06:44 AM

Thanks. I'll be giving this a try as time permits for me. I've updated to the latest version of Java. How do I make sure that the older versions of Java have been deleted? Are they deleted automatically when I install the latest version of Java?

#4 quietman7

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Posted 03 May 2011 - 06:54 AM

Starting with Java 6 update 10, the uninstaller incorporated in each new release uses Enhanced Auto update to automatically remove the previous version when updating to a later update release. It will not remove older versions installed before update 10, so they will need to be removed manually.

To remove older versions, go to Posted Image > Control Panel, double-click on Add/Remove Programs or Programs and Features in Vista/Windows 7 and remove all older versions of Java.
  • Check (highlight) any item with Java Runtime Environment (JRE or J2SE) in the name.
    Note: If you already installed the latest update, ignore that entry and do not remove it.
  • Click the Remove or Change/Remove button and follow the onscreen instructions for the Java uninstaller.

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