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New Hd Questions Re; Double Data?


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#1 kazily

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Posted 01 January 2006 - 02:49 PM

I'm glad I found this forum! I am a complete novice. I added a new HD to my Gateway PC. Old HD is a Maxtor 20 GB set to slave. New one is WD Caviar 80 GB set to Master. I used WD's copy utility CD to copy data to the new bootable drive since it is bigger storage & faster.

I partitioned the new HD with 2 partitons (20 GB fat-32 & 60 GB NTFS). Close to that anyway lol! The Western Digital Lifetools copied everything over.

I ASSume I now have 2 win XP's and 2 copies of everything else that is on the old drive? There was no information on the cd about what to do about this. I looked at WD website but couldn't find the info I need.

One oddity: the old drive has 13 GB used 5 GB free. After copying...the "new" C drive has 17 GB used space 1.7 free so is that because it copied the free space? Just a guess. I'm so out of my league lol!

I appreciate any suggestions for a novice on what to do with the old drive (now designated as letter F...this is so frustrating I can think of a word that would stand for :thumbsup: ) The 2nd partition is G I think...

I'm happy I was able to do the manual install but what to do now? Helpppppp! :flowers: I planned to keep the old drive on & extra one by the way.

edit---I thought I should add that I am pretty sure I have the winXP cd that came with my computer. Not sure it is a full XP cd though. If I reformat the old HD...I still would have XP on the new drive?

Edited by kazily, 01 January 2006 - 02:58 PM.


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#2 Rimmer

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Posted 01 January 2006 - 09:12 PM

:thumbsup: to BC kazily,

I'm not sure I understand your questions but I'll try to answer them, just post back if I don't cover what you wanted to know.

Firstly - do nothing to your original drive until everything is sorted out with the new drive. Do your drives have volume labels (names) so you can be very sure which drive you are looking at? (Not just the drive letter because that changes depending on how you boot the system.) E.g. you could label the two partitions on your new drive 80GIGA and 80GIGB or something else informative.

The two partitions are a good idea (recommended by many) but usually that is done in the case of a new installation where the first partition only contains essential Windows components and all user files, caches, temporary storage, etc is put on the second partition. At the moment you have your whole system on the first partition - you should think about relocating your user folders to the second partition to give Windows a bit more room. Why did you make the first partition FAT32 and the second NTFS by the way?

I ASSume I now have 2 win XP's and 2 copies of everything else that is on the old drive?

You would have a copy of everything on the new 20GB partition but whether you have a second copy on the 60GB partition depends on how you did things. When you boot windows that partition should be your D: drive, open up Windows Explorer (or use My Computer) and look at what's on that drive. If it's got files and folders there then you do have another copy of your system. I'd suggest there is very little benefit in having another copy [i]on the same drive[/b] copies are for disaster recovery e.g. after the drive fails. If your 80GB drive fails then you loose both copies of your system anyway. I'd suggest you use Windows to format it so you have a clean partition to use.

the old drive has 13 GB used 5 GB free. After copying...the "new" C drive has 17 GB used space 1.7 free so is that because it copied the free space?

I'm not familiar with the WD Lifetools you used but any free space you copied would still be free space on the new drive so that's not the answer. I'd like to know what functions you used in the Lifetools to know what's going on. Are you currently booting from the new 20GB partition? If you are not certain open your computer, remove the power cable from your old drive and reboot.

The 2nd partition is G I think...

What optical drives (CD/DVD) do you have? Look in windows Disk Manager for the facts about what partitions are where and what they are called. Go to Control Panel>'Administrative Tools'>'Computer Management'>'Disk Management'. If you can post a screenshot of that it will help myself and others to understand your situation better. See this tutorial - How to take a Screenshot

If I reformat the old HD...I still would have XP on the new drive?

Yes but don't reformat the old drive until you are certain everything is as you want it on the new drive. If the system were mine I'd be looking to use the old drive as a monthly or weekly backup of your data. Others may have better suggestions.

hth :flowers:

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#3 kazily

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Posted 01 January 2006 - 11:01 PM

Do your drives have volume labels (names) so you can be very sure which drive you are looking at?

Yes I think so.
In explorer --
C drive is DRV2_Vol1 now 14.5 GB used 4.29 GB free
G Drive is DRV2_Vol2 66.2 mb used 55.5 GB free
Local Disk (F) 12.2 GB used 6.8 GB free (this is appropriately what my old drive had before installing the new drive)
CDRW is E
DVD is D


At the moment you have your whole system on the first partition... Why did you make the first partition FAT32 and the second NTFS by the way?

Yikes! I didn't plan on that. Not sure how I did that. I knew the old drive took up at least 14-15 GB so I set the 1st partition to about 20GB & the fat-32 was automatic).

open up Windows Explorer (or use My Computer) and look at what's on that drive. If it's got files and folders there then you do have another copy of your system.

The large partition is free space other than that small 66 mb. Not sure what that is because the drive has no folder when I explore it. I was refferring to winXP being on the old drive & the new one, thus 2 copies of everything.

I'd like to know what functions you used in the Lifetools to know what's going on. Are you currently booting from the new 20GB partition? If you are not certain open your computer, remove the power cable from your old drive and reboot.

I set the new drive to be bootable & set jumper settings according to the diagram that came with the drive. I then used Lifetools, first setting partitions & then their copy utility to copy everything over to the new drive. I will pull the power as soon as I can & see if I am really booting from the new drive. I set it to master bootable but do not know if I really am booting from it.

Look in windows Disk Manager for the facts about what partitions are where and what they are called. If you can post a screenshot of that it will help myself and others to understand your situation better.

[b] I will do that now


don't reformat the old drive until you are certain everything is as you want it on the new drive. If the system were mine I'd be looking to use the old drive as a monthly or weekly backup of your data.

[b]Thanks, that's a wonderful idea

Edited by kazily, 01 January 2006 - 11:03 PM.


#4 kazily

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Posted 01 January 2006 - 11:07 PM

Here's my screenshot. I hope it helps. Photbucket hosting made it look aweful.

F listed first says healthy (active) C says healthy (system) & G says healthy.


http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y92/kazil.../screenshot.jpg

Edited by kazily, 01 January 2006 - 11:09 PM.


#5 Rimmer

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Posted 02 January 2006 - 12:38 AM

Well that looks like you did a good job of installing the new drive - it certainly looks like you are booting from DRV2-VOL1.

I thought perhaps your first partition was FAT32 because the original had used FAT32 but I see the original drive was NTFS. There are some advantages to using NTFS mostly relating to large disc sizes, encryption and access permissions. I'm not sure if it's worthwhile repeating the whole process to make your new system disk NTFS or not.....

I note your new C: drive (system disk) shows 4.2GB free space which is a lot better than 1.7GB. The change from NTFS to FAT32 probably explains the differing free space as well (since NTFS is supposed to be a more efficient file system than FAT32).

While you have a backup of your system handy (the original drive) try using this cleanup utility on the new C: drive - you may be surprised how much space it frees up. CCleaner
Do NOT use the 'Applications' or 'Issues' tabs, they are for expert users only.

When that's finished reboot in Safe Mode and do a defrag.
If you are not sure how to boot in Safe Mode there is a tutorial here: Safe Mode
Start > Programs > Accessories > System Tools > Disk Defragmenter

If you do not like the designations G: and F: for your hard drives you can change the assigned letter in Disk Management, you can change the designation for the CD/DVD drives as well but some software may complain.

hth :thumbsup:

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#6 kazily

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Posted 02 January 2006 - 01:51 AM

Thanks SO much for your advice Rimmer. I have CCleaner already & use it weekly. I also have TuneUp Utilities 2006 & use that weekly. A few anti-spyware programs, anti-virus etc.

I should leave my old drive as it is? Should I keep both copies of XP? For some reason...possibly a RAM issue (I have 384mb I think), the computer seems to be dragging just a little since the upgrade. Maybe that could be the fat-32 partition causing a slower computer? It isn't too bad but is noticeable.

Thanks again for your help. I will run my CCleaner & defrag.

Edited by kazily, 02 January 2006 - 01:52 AM.


#7 Rimmer

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Posted 02 January 2006 - 02:21 AM

I hope I have helped. I'm not a fan of Tune up Utilities but don't know that specific one.
Once your new drive is 'bedded in' there's no point in having another copy of XP. You can recover XP and applications from your CDs anytime, its your own data which needs to be backed up - emails, bookmarks (favourites), documents, photos, music, etc.etc.
Spend some time on this site looking at the Self-Help forum - http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/f/55/spyware-and-malware-removal-guides-and-reading-room/
and the Tutorials section, particularly this one http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/keep-your-computer-safe-online/ and you will learn a lot about keeping your PC safe and running properly.
:thumbsup:

Edited by Rimmer, 02 January 2006 - 02:25 AM.


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#8 linderman

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Posted 02 January 2006 - 10:12 AM

Why would you be so willing to delete your cloned or original drive ?????? I am a huge fan of cloning because there is no better means of back-up available then a bootable copy of your entire OS drive ?????

I see posts all the time "help me recover my data ????? what do I do ????" this is easily avoidable with cloning / every since I got into cloning I have never spent so much as even 5 minutes in the recovery console trying to fix a boogerd OS. I can remember though spending hours trying to fix corrupt partition tables, MBR's >>> fix ntldr missisng etc etc and after hours of hacking away maybe fix the OS or maybe just partial fix it an the OS ran like slooooow poop.

Now I never play with a jammed up OS >>> when it happens to me or my customers I just boot to the other clooned copy of the drive and away it goes >>>>> sero fill the boogered one and reclone from the working drive.

Hard drive nowdays are dirt cheap >>>> for the cost of one bout playing with recovery software you could have had another drive tucked away with a bootable copy of your OS.

you may want to think over >>> giving up and reformatting your back-up OS copy >>>> I reclone my major boot drive once per week if everything is running well. I am a back-up freaK i have learned the hard way >>>> I bought some used 80 gig WD hard drives off ebay for $25.00 each I have two cloned copies of my entire OS disk

goodluck & enjoy you have done very well so far

joe

#9 Rimmer

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Posted 02 January 2006 - 05:44 PM

linderman - that is a good strategy if you can clone the whole drive. But the question here is what's the best use of the 'old' 20GB drive. Kazily could use it as a clone of the 20GB system partition which would make it easy to recover from system problems but that leaves the 60GB partition without backup (except to CDRW etc and I'm not sure either drive is a burner anyway). Faced with a choice of either cloning Windows or backing up your data I'd suggest backing up the data is more important, but it is a personal choice which depends on use the system is put to. Someone who only surfs the internet and emails would want a different backup strategy to someone who was writing a novel or archiving family photos.

The key point is whatever backup strategy you choose make sure you use it! :thumbsup:

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#10 linderman

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Posted 02 January 2006 - 05:48 PM

Rimmer:

how true !!!


thanks for the clarification




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