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cpu test?


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#1 joggiwagga

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 10:49 AM

Is there a way to check if the CPU is good?

I posted a while back about if the problem with this computer could be a busted mobo. New mobo came in today, I take out old, and in the process realize that the heat sink I just removed to swap over to the other mobo SHOULD have been glued to the CPU nestled underneath it.

There IS a chance the heat sink was properly glued down to the CPU until after it stopped working (but unstuck during the attempts to replace the PSU as the heat sink has a huge effing fan that gets in the way of everything). If that was the case when we got the new PSU hooked up there was no booting action once things were hooked up (the problem that caused the computer to be pulled from use in the first place).

So I'm hoping that the computer died while everything was properly hooked up and that I didn't just order a new mobo when the issue was the CPU, but I have no clue how to check this. Fortunately the place I purchased it from has a decent return policy if its needed, and I have to dig up thermal paste regardless if the CPU is fine so this is something I need to finish today.

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#2 Sneakycyber

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 06:53 PM

The CPU shouldn't have been glued to the heat sink. It may have been stuck with thermal compound. I would remove everything from the motherboard (including the CPU) and see if you can get any post beeps. You should get something with everything removed (unless the bad CPU fried the new mobo). The only way to test a CPU without expensive equipment is to try it in a known good board like you did or use a known good processor in the problem computer. Also don't power the pc up without thermal compound and the heat sink installed you can flash the CPU (overheat and POOF)
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#3 joggiwagga

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 08:38 AM

I know it shouldn't be bonded with glue. I was using glue as a general adhesive bonding term. My apologies.

I know that the original motherboard I have stopped working before I started my job and there are no post beeps or anything when the mobo is powered up. We assumed the mobo was fried and got a new one, in the installation process I realized that at some point the CPU was detached from its heatsink/fan set up, which may have been when the power supply was being played with. Both before and after that point there were no post beeps.

Sounds like I'll need to pull the other computer that's the same as this one and see how the components work. I'm trying to see if we have any thermal paste (not likely but I need to check with maintenance before I order any) so I can reattach the heatsink/fan to the CPU to test.

#4 joggiwagga

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 10:23 AM

so I actually looked at the set up of a functioning computer of the same build, and realized probably why I didn't think to test the cpu in a different mobo The heat sink overlaps the cpu socket in such a way that you actually cannot remove it w/out separating the heat sink in the first place. The anchoring mechanism does not have the freedom of movement to fully release the chip. Fun times ahead.

#5 Sneakycyber

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Posted 27 April 2011 - 09:20 AM

That's generally the case. You remove the heat sink and fan then remove the processor, however allot of the time the processor is pulled from its socket when removing the heat sink. This isn't generally a problem as long as you didn't bend any pins in the process. You can use a thin piece of metal such as feeler gauge to gently insert between the heat sink and processor to make heat sink removal without the processor easier. Be care full not to short any circuits with the piece of metal (the computer should be off but still contains a small amount of voltage)
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#6 joggiwagga

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Posted 27 April 2011 - 01:54 PM

Got the computer back up and running with the new mobo. CPU was thankfully fine (and the heat sink had already been removed which had been the source of my concern).

#7 Sneakycyber

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Posted 28 April 2011 - 08:02 PM

Thanks for posting your solution glad you got it working :busy:
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