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21" CRT Apple Studio Display Trouble


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#1 Hotter Than July

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 08:53 AM

Hello,

My sister and I ran across a couple of CRT Apple Studio Displays. One is 21", the other is 17.5", which is on my desk.
The 21" one did not work from the beginning. I hooked it up to my laptop, an Acer Aspire 3680, and tried to use it in Ubuntu 10.04.1 LTS and Mac OS X Tiger (10.4 as far as I know), and it would not display anything in either OS, but you could hear clicks coming from the inside, which my sister took as it trying to work.
The 17.5" one was a different story. It worked okay from the beginning; we had it hooked up to a blue and white PowerMac G3, and the screen would occasionally make a flickering noise, the screen would get dark, and it would zoom in some toward the center. Some times it would get into fits of doing this that would keep on until I turned it off and turned it back on. I hooked it up to my laptop a couple of times and it worked just fine, though I got aggravated with the screen resolution. Currently, it's doing the exact same thing as the 21" monitor.
My sister and I are not too keen on looking at the problem because it's a CRT monitor, but my laptop screen is almost compltely broken, and we can't buy another monitor.
What do you think is the problem, or how can we fix it?

Thanks in advance,

Hotter Than July
"Snake, you have to use the control panel."

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#2 dc3

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 11:01 AM

CRT monitors are expensive to have repaired, and because of the high voltage potentials inside you do not want to go poking around inside of it. CRTs are a dime a dozen, you should be able to pick one up for a small amount of money. If the person you are buying it from doesn't have the means of demonstrating that it is working make sure you can return it for you money before purchasing it.

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#3 lti

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 01:28 PM

Many repair shops won't even look at a CRT monitor these days. If you can't return the monitors, try to find a repair shop or someone that knows what they're doing and can repair them for a reasonable price.

If you can solder, have the proper testing equipment, and know what parts produce the high voltages mentioned above, you can repair it yourself for less than the price of a new monitor. I successfully repaired an old CRT TV after discovering that the cheapest new TV I could find cost almost 100 times the price of the part that failed in the old one.

#4 dc3

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 06:27 PM

Many repair shops won't even look at a CRT monitor these days. If you can't return the monitors, try to find a repair shop or someone that knows what they're doing and can repair them for a reasonable price.

If you can solder, have the proper testing equipment, and know what parts produce the high voltages mentioned above, you can repair it yourself for less than the price of a new monitor. I successfully repaired an old CRT TV after discovering that the cheapest new TV I could find cost almost 100 times the price of the part that failed in the old one.


Shop hours are about $60.00 per hour, it ain't worth it.

If you can solder, have the proper testing equipment, and know what parts produce the high voltages mentioned above, you can repair it yourself for less than the price of a new monitor.



And you can build a laser that can burn holes in plastic if you have the knowledge. But let's be real about this, you are suggesting a lengthy education to reach the point where an individual would be capable of trouble shooting a problem like this.

I know a fair amount about the flyback assembly of a CPR monitor/TV and wouldn't even begin to try to trouble shoot it. I can't emphasize enough the inherent dangers of the high voltage potentials that exist inside and will remain stored for months. We warn members about the dangers of the high voltage potentials stored in the capacitors of a PSU, that's nothing by comparison to what a CRT holds.

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#5 caperjac

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 08:08 PM

Hello,

.
What do you think is the problem, or how can we fix it?

Thanks in advance,

Hotter Than July

the problem is its broke,
how to fix ,there is not a person on this forum that can tell you how to fix it /maybe where to take it to get it checked out ,save you money for another monitor ,if you lived near me i would give you a working crt 17" i have out in the shead,i cant even get 20 dollars for it .good luck

Edited by caperjac, 24 April 2011 - 02:44 PM.

My answers are my opinion only,usually


#6 lti

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 12:43 PM

Shop hours are about $60.00 per hour, it ain't worth it.


And you can build a laser that can burn holes in plastic if you have the knowledge. But let's be real about this, you are suggesting a lengthy education to reach the point where an individual would be capable of trouble shooting a problem like this.

I know a fair amount about the flyback assembly of a CPR monitor/TV and wouldn't even begin to try to trouble shoot it. I can't emphasize enough the inherent dangers of the high voltage potentials that exist inside and will remain stored for months. We warn members about the dangers of the high voltage potentials stored in the capacitors of a PSU, that's nothing by comparison to what a CRT holds.


I think you misunderstood what I was saying. I wasn't suggesting that people with broken monitors should learn how to fix them. I was trying to say that people that already have this knowledge can fix things on their own without going to a repair shop.
When I was repairing that TV, I stayed away from the high voltage components.

I was also trying to say that it would not be worth taking these monitors to a repair shop due to the high labor costs you mentioned, provided that you can find one that will look at a CRT monitor.

#7 Hotter Than July

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Posted 27 April 2011 - 11:22 AM

I know that CRT monitors are very high voltage (12,000 volts right??) primarily in the flyback transformer, the anode, and the connecting cable and can carry that charge for years- honestly I'm not too eager about handling any of it because I'm not experienced with CRTs at all (and I'm not ready to find out the hard way). The most work I've done with CRTs is helping my sister while our dad helped us repair the power cable for an Apple II and Apple III monitor- aside from avoiding the high voltage parts when we opened a bunch of G3 iMacs.

The main reason I haven't taken it to anyone to get them fixed is because the larger monitor weighs upward of 70 pounds and we probably don't have enough money to get either of them fixed. The only reason I'm being so anal about getting it fixed is because my laptop's screen is pretty much on it's last life (I'd say about 2/3 is a rainbow of dead pixels) and I'd like to be able to see what I'm doing until I'm able to get a new laptop, which isn't looking like any time soon.

Also, apparently, my sister's been looking around, and on a different forum, someone said it was probably a faulty transistor or capacitor- does that sound like it could be the problem? Whenever we turn on either of the monitors, the sound it makes is a loud clicking or like the sound or putting a glass down on metal; it comes from a little bit off the center of the screen, from about where the electron gun would be.
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