Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

My Computer Won't Start Up


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 TwinsenDude

TwinsenDude

  • Members
  • 5 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:34 AM

Posted 30 December 2005 - 09:51 PM

Okay, so I went into my BIOS and went through a bunch of my settings, and did some stuff like overclocking the CPU (stupidly, I didn't go in small intervals or anything, I changed the bus speed (I think it was the bus speed) from 200Mhz to 300Mhz. I'm pretty sure I changed some other settings too, but I can't remember and I'm not sure.

Now, when I start up, nothing shows up on the monitor. At all. In fact, I get a "no input" message on the monitor.

I'm using a socket 754 PC I built myself, with a mach speed motherboard, AMD Athlon 64 Processor, and the graphics card is an nVidia 6200 (of sorts).

I tried pressing delete when the computer starts up and using the arrow keys to go to the reset to default settings button based on where the manual says it is, but it doesn't work, leading me to believe that either A: It's not even getting to the BIOS or the startup at all B: Default settings don't fix it and either I need some other settings or I fried some of my hardware ( :thumbsup: ) C: Something I didn't think of happened.

Can someone please help me? I need that PC to finish my college applications.... :-(

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


m

#2 phawgg

phawgg

    Learning Daily


  • Members
  • 4,543 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Location:Washington State, USA
  • Local time:06:34 AM

Posted 30 December 2005 - 10:23 PM

OUCH, das ist nicht gutt ...

hmmm, if you could try the restore defaults at all, you were in the BIOS screen.

(the dos type b&w console) where up/down arrows work with the enter key ...

So, restart do the delete key thing (btw, exact mobo/cpu etc. specs will help)
and read all you can ...

I think we need more info to restore your data. all is not lost, I think, tho.
patiently patrolling, plenty of persisant pests n' problems ...

#3 chefkrh

chefkrh

  • Members
  • 7 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:10:34 AM

Posted 30 December 2005 - 10:46 PM

i did the same thing. i fixed it by going to the motherboard manufacturers website and downloading a bios update flash program onto a floppy. when i inserted it and then started up my system, i held down ctrl+home and it forced a bios flash that restored my defaults and i was able to get back in.

#4 TwinsenDude

TwinsenDude
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 5 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:34 AM

Posted 30 December 2005 - 11:32 PM

i did the same thing. i fixed it by going to the motherboard manufacturers website and downloading a bios update flash program onto a floppy. when i inserted it and then started up my system, i held down ctrl+home and it forced a bios flash that restored my defaults and i was able to get back in.


crap, I don't have a floppy drive :-(

And to the other guy, I couldn't see the bios screen, I meant that I did it without being able to see, in case it worked. Like nothing was on the screen, I was just hoping that it was on the computer and not the screen and pushing the buttons would help.

So if you can do that with a floppy, can you do it with a cd?

#5 phawgg

phawgg

    Learning Daily


  • Members
  • 4,543 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Location:Washington State, USA
  • Local time:06:34 AM

Posted 31 December 2005 - 02:31 AM

So if you can do that with a floppy, can you do it with a cd?

Yes. It is good advice. :thumbsup:
patiently patrolling, plenty of persisant pests n' problems ...

#6 mjc

mjc

  • Members
  • 14 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:06:34 AM

Posted 31 December 2005 - 03:12 AM

:thumbsup: If you can't access BIOS use the clear CMOS jumper on motherboard. :flowers:

#7 TwinsenDude

TwinsenDude
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 5 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:34 AM

Posted 31 December 2005 - 11:33 AM

So if you can do that with a floppy, can you do it with a cd?

Yes. It is good advice. :thumbsup:


Okay, but how do I make a boot disc out of a CD? Don't I need some boot.ini or something?

:flowers: If you can't access BIOS use the clear CMOS jumper on motherboard. :trumpet:


1: What is that?
2: Where is that?
3: How do I do that?
4: What will that do? It won't erase all my hd data will it?
5: Thanks, hope I don't sound like an a-hole, I just really can't have my hd data erased.

Edited by TwinsenDude, 31 December 2005 - 11:34 AM.


#8 phawgg

phawgg

    Learning Daily


  • Members
  • 4,543 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Location:Washington State, USA
  • Local time:06:34 AM

Posted 31 December 2005 - 12:52 PM

A boot disk on CD requires an app to accomplish it. if you download an .iso image say, from online.
You can also get the boot CD prepared to work immediately. Difference being, the .iso must be "converted" to it's actual files ... .exe & others, to work. Those boot CDs arrange files to some extent, to allow for the sequential action(s) of the boot (or starting) process. The .iso image files are like that in that they will be "arranged" exactly right when burned to CD. Floppy boot disk(s) often contain less files, and simpler arrangement of them, since 1.44mb is the max size allowed.

I use Nero 6, to convert .iso images to actual files.
Honestly, i don't know which other application to recommend.
There are free ones, I think. I hope someone will help out ...

CMOS is:
1. a battery-powered tiny "operating system" within the mobo's BIOS. It stores data like date/time to assist the BIOS in it's task(s) prior to booting windows, and can also exclude boot sequence if a password was set and forgotten, for instance.
2. your mobo manufacturer's manual will indicate where on the board this typically 3 pin connect is. Check website for such info if you lack the manual.
3. It may vary depending on mobo types, I use MSI, procedure is "with power off, pull jumper and restore it to original position".
4. It erases only a kb or so of total data, only specific as mentioned. Restoration of default settings is your goal with this.

Typically a msg stating something like "You are not allowed in BIOS" will appear if the password problem involving CMOS is the case, but it is possible another variable exists in this case which simply is preventing the proper boot into BIOS and then into the winOS.

Keep in mind part of the BIOS load (the first part) is called POST.

POST means PowerOnSelfTest. This is where & when the mobo determines if all connections needed are not improper. A disconnected power wire could easily prevent BIOS load based on an unsuccessful POST. Your (of sorts) vid card could be a bad match for some reason and making POST fail, resulting in no input, but if the BIOS screen appears, you are in BIOS. Documentation of problem(s) might appear to you there, and then, depending on your particular BIOS, but a POST failure might also simply prevent BIOS appearing, too.

These reasons are why it is necessary to understand the individual manufacturer's specs and recommendations exactly.

Edited by phawgg, 31 December 2005 - 12:58 PM.

patiently patrolling, plenty of persisant pests n' problems ...

#9 TwinsenDude

TwinsenDude
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 5 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:34 AM

Posted 31 December 2005 - 04:12 PM

Thanks a lot for the detailed response, I'll try that jumper. I don't think the graphx card is a bad match, because the computer has been working fine for about two weeks with it.

#10 TwinsenDude

TwinsenDude
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 5 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:09:34 AM

Posted 31 December 2005 - 04:37 PM

Thanks a million! I cleared the CMOS and now my computer is running beautifully again! I'll be more careful if I ever try overclocking again.

Thanks guys!




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users