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how do I extract data from a dead laptops hard drive


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#1 alow1332

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Posted 18 April 2011 - 08:22 PM

I am using Windows XP and the battery is dead and will not powernon/charge with/without the battery. I am needing information off of the hard drive. How can I get it. I have a netbook I can use but that is the only other computer. Its basically music and picture files. Any suggestions helps......

The ac power jack has been replaced and the power cord has been replaced in the other dead laptop....

Edit: Moved topic from Tutorials to the more appropriate forum. ~ Animal

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#2 Broni

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Posted 18 April 2011 - 09:39 PM

Buy so called USB hard drive enclosure.
You put laptop's hard drive inside and connect it through USB cable to your netbook.
~$20.

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#3 ThunderZ

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Posted 18 April 2011 - 09:46 PM

More specifically a 2.5" enclosure or a drive caddie\dock is another option. EXAMPLES ONLY

#4 alow1332

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Posted 18 April 2011 - 09:51 PM

Thanks.....

#5 strolln

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Posted 18 April 2011 - 09:52 PM

Another alternative: USB SATA/IDE Adapter. Shipping may be prohibitive so you'd be better off finding something like this locally.
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#6 ViroDox

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Posted 23 April 2011 - 09:11 PM

You could put the hard drive in your other laptop. If it doesn't fit, and your a techie, take off the case of the old hard drive. Take off the case of the new one. Put the internal into the newer laptops case, and put it in your PC. Don't forget the screws. This might arise a few problems if you do it incorrectly, and it may be troublesome. But it's the cheapest way.

#7 JEBwebs

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 03:16 PM

Tech Essentials - Reading HDDs

The ability to pull data from any source currently in use, is a skill needed by all techs.

Two types recommended. Both types connect the HDD to the reading system through USB v2.0.

1. SATA/PATA(IDE) HDD connector:

A simple enough setup to throw in the bag and carry when needed. In simple terms this is a digital junction box able access, read and write SATA or PATA (IDE) drives. Attractive features on this model include the inline Power Switch between the AC Adapter block and the 4 pin Molex connector adding power to the device, to bad it isn't light with a dummy light. Having a 4-5 inch IDE 40pin ribbon cable makes it easier to connect to and access the larger drives but is not needed for the smaller laptop drives. Also, not having to carry a socket to AC Adpater power cord is a plus as most offices and homes have extras.


There are a good number of models of this on the market. Find one that'll work best for you but be advised don't make a snap buy on this one or you may find yourself buying it more than once.

Plan to spend USD$20-30 on this item.

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2. SATA HDD Docking Station:

A deskspace occupier able to read both 2.5" & 3.5" form factor SATA HDD's. In simple terms this is a digital junction box able access read and write to any SATA drive plugged into it. I use a Thermaltake BlacX picked up for about USD$20 but I see the price has more than doubled with the newer models able to read up to 3TB drives. If in a med-lrg business environment it's nearly a forced purchase but small and non-business users may be able to avoid the additional cost for a year or two. In that time the prices may drop.


Not shown is the AC power Adapter powering the device and the oval button on the lower right corner is not the power switch, the power switch is on the back panel (also not shown (I use google, you can too)).


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